18

Is there a really large variable type I can use in Java to store huge numbers (up to around forty digits)?

long's maximum value is 9223372036854775807, which is 19 digits -- not nearly large enough.

I'm trying to create a calculator that can handle large numbers, because most nowadays can only hold an insufficient 10 digits or so, and I want want accurate calculations with numbers of a much larger magnitude

EDIT

Thanks for the answers. I can use BigInteger for big integers, the only limit being the computer's memory (should be sufficient). For decimals, I'll use float ^e, as @WebDaldo suggested, or BigDecimal (similar to BigInteger), as @kocko suggested.

28

You can use BigInteger class.

BigInteger bi1 = new BigInteger("637824629384623845238423545642384"); 
BigInteger bi2 = new BigInteger("3039768898793547264523745379249934"); 

BigInteger bigSum = bi1.add(bi2);

BigInteger bigProduct = bi1.multiply(bi2);

System.out.println("Sum : " + bigSum);
System.out.println("Product : " + bigProduct);

Output:

Sum : 3677593528178171109762168924892318

Product : 1938839471287900434078965247064711159607977007048190357000119602656

I should mention BigDecimal, which is excellent for amount calculations compare to double.

BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal("123234545.4767");
BigDecimal displayVal = bd.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN);

NumberFormat usdFormat = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(Locale.US);        
System.out.println(usdFormat.format(displayVal.doubleValue()));

Output:

$123,234,545.48

  • 1
    do you know what the largest value of BigInteger is? – Jonathan Lam Aug 26 '13 at 12:48
  • @Jon: Probably somewhere above 2^1000000. Depends on how much memory you have, really. – cHao Aug 26 '13 at 12:51
  • 3
    @Jon It's (2^32)^(2^31-1). – arshajii Aug 26 '13 at 12:52
  • can i use; BigInteger testData = Math.random() * LIMIT + 1; ?? – roottraveller Apr 21 '17 at 4:33
  • @rootTraveller You must understand the differences among different types, primitives vs objects, etc. If you want to randomize, look at these answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/8244691/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/2290057/… – Sajal Dutta Apr 21 '17 at 4:51
12

You can try using the BigInteger class for operations with really huge integer numbers.

For operations with floating numbers, Java provides the BigDecimal class, which can be useful, as well.

4

For calculations with exponents, like you would use in a calculator, you should use BigDecimal. The problem with BigInteger is that it only handles integers (no fractional numbers) and that for really big numbers like 10^100 it stores all the zeros, using a lot of memory, instead of using a format based on scientific notation.

You could alternatively use the floating point number type double, which gives you a large range of values, low memory usage and fast operations. But because of rounding issues and limited precision (around 16 decimal digits), I wouldn't recommend using it unless you really know what you're doing.

2

You can use float ^e

so you could have

0.55342663552772737682136182736127836782163 * 10^e

Calculators are mostly use that, too.

  • 1
    A java float isn't arbitrary precision... – Anders R. Bystrup Aug 26 '13 at 12:51
  • 1
    A float has only about 8 decimal digits of precision. You probably should avoid using it. – Joni Aug 26 '13 at 12:55
  • 1
    (docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-4.html#jls-4.2.3) The floating-point types are float and double, which are conceptually associated with the single-precision 32-bit and double-precision 64-bit format IEEE 754 values and operations as specified in IEEE Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic, ANSI/IEEE Standard 754-1985 (IEEE, New York). – JavaDM Aug 26 '13 at 12:58
  • 1
    You do know that 32 bits means that only 23 are used for the mantissa? And that with 23 bits you can only represent numbers with 7-8 digits, right? – Joni Aug 26 '13 at 13:28
1

This is for all bigger numbers above 15 since using int blows it. You may want to find the factorial of 50 or 100 0r 500.

// Recursive version of the Fat factorial for bigger numbers ex: Factorial of 500     
BigInteger fatFactorial(int b) {
    if (BigInteger.ONE.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(b))
        || BigInteger.ZERO.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(b))) {
            return BigInteger.ONE;
    } else {
        return BigInteger.valueOf(b).multiply(fatFactorial(b - 1));
        }
    }
  • 4
    Although the code is appreciated, it should always have an accompanying explanation. This doesn't have to be long but it is expected. – peterh says reinstate Monica May 17 '15 at 6:40
  • This is for all bigger numbers above 15 since using int blows it. You may want to find the factorial of 50 or 100 0r 500. This works. – kamals1986 May 17 '15 at 8:36
  • public class Factorial { BigInteger fatFactorial(int b) { if (BigInteger.ONE.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(b)) || BigInteger.ZERO.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(b))) { return BigInteger.ONE; } else { return BigInteger.valueOf(b).multiply(fatFactorial(b - 1)); } } public static void main(String[] args) { Factorial fac = new Factorial(); System.out.println("Fat Numbers Fact of " + 500 + " = " + fac.fatFactorial(500)); } } – kamals1986 May 17 '15 at 8:38
  • 1
    No, no! Edit it into your answer. The explanation is not for me, it is for the googlers of the future (and for the java beginners). – peterh says reinstate Monica May 17 '15 at 8:41
  • No, you don't need to include the whole class, it doesn't make things more clear. Your original code snippet is enough, but give an explanation with that. – peterh says reinstate Monica May 17 '15 at 8:42

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