15
csvfile_ = open(finishedFileName+num+".csv","w",newline='')
writ = csv.writer(csvfile_, dialect='excel')
firstline = unicode(str(firstline))
try:
    writ.writerow(firstline)
except TypeError:
    print firstline
    print type(firstline)
    raise

I get a TypeError: must be unicode, not str with this code. When printing the type of firstline, I see <type 'unicode'>. When I print firstline, I see ['project_number', 'project_location'](The list is longer than that, but it continues in that style.)

This program was working fine in python 3.3. I ported it over with 3to2, switching from unix to windows as I did so.

How do I make this program write smoothly?

Note: This version of the csv module doesn’t support Unicode input according to the official documentation, but it told me to give it Unicode input anyway.

Full exception

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 382, in <module>
    process(marketingLogExportFileName)
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 123, in process
    writing(csvfile,modified,firstline)
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 114, in writing
    writ.writerow(firstline)
TypeError: must be unicode, not str

If I take out the code to make firstline unicode, I instead get

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 382, in <module>
    process(marketingLogExportFileName)
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 123, in process
    writing(csvfile_,modified,firstline)
  File "C:\Users\urightswt\Downloads\LogModToConvert.py", line 114, in writing
    writ.writerow(firstline)
TypeError: must be unicode, not str
9
  • You are looking at only the exception; remove the TypeError and look at the full traceback.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 26, 2013 at 17:03
  • 1
    The csv module in Python 2.7 is documented as not supporting unicode.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 26, 2013 at 17:04
  • What is csvfile_? Is it an open file object opened with the io or codecs module, that auto-encodes Unicode? If so, then it is that file object that expects Unicode, not the CSV module. Please show us the code that opens the file object.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 26, 2013 at 17:05
  • and open is imported from where? The built-in open() function does not accept a newline parameter on Python 2.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 26, 2013 at 17:07
  • 1
    Try unicodecsv. It wraps CSV with unicode.
    – DivinusVox
    Commented Aug 26, 2013 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

18

Unfortunately, 3to2 used the io.open() call instead of the built-in Python 2 open() function. This opened the file in text mode, which like on Python 3 expects Unicode input.

However, the csv module does not support Unicode data; it certainly does not produce Unicode.

You'll either have to open the file in binary mode on Python 2:

mode = 'w'
if sys.version_info.major < 3:
    mode += 'b'
csvfile_ = open(finishedFileName + num + ".csv", mode, newline='')

or use the built-in open() call instead:

csvfile_ = open(finishedFileName + num + ".csv", 'wb')

where you have to use 'wb' as the mode anyway.

If you are trying to write out unicode data, you'll have to encode that data before passing it to the csv.writer() object. The csv module examples section includes code to make encoding from Unicode before writing a little easier.

4
  • I was trying to write a CSV processing program which should run with either Python 2 or Python 3 and I found this answer (found via search engine) to be helpful. I'm surprised to be the first user to upvote it. Commented May 7, 2014 at 9:32
  • Could it be that you missed from future.builtins import open in the first snippet? I think newline is not in Python 2 open. Commented Dec 6, 2014 at 6:17
  • @moose: that's the whole point of the answer; see also the comments on the question. The import is from io import open; future_builtins doesn't include open. I offered options to make the code 3to2 compatible.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Dec 6, 2014 at 9:11
  • @moose: so in other words: in Python 3 you'd not have an import statement for the open() call; it is the 3to2 tool that would add that in.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Dec 6, 2014 at 9:14
2

Martijn Pieters' solution using 'w' or 'wb' does not seem to work because of the newline argument. I personally get a ValueError.

ValueError: binary mode doesn't take a newline argument

Which I don't really understand, I would expect io to ignore it rather than raise an Exception. The only solution that works for me both on python 2 and 3 is:

if sys.version_info.major < 3:
    open(my_csv_file, 'rb')
else:
    open(my_csv_file, 'r', newline='')

Solution that can become very heavy when you open a lot of files. Martijn solution was cleaner in that regard, if only it could work!

EDIT: I think the cleanest working solution when developing a package that needs to read/write files often is to create a small utility function that can be called everywhere in the package:

import sys
import io

def open_csv_rb(my_file):
    if sys.version_info[0] < 3:
        return io.open(my_file, 'rb')
    else:
        return io.open(my_file, 'r', encoding='utf8')

def open_csv_wb(my_file):
    if sys.version_info[0] < 3:
        return io.open(my_file, 'wb')
    else:
        return io.open(my_file, 'w', newline='', encoding='utf8')
-1

I had the same problem with open() and csv. A friend gave me the solution, which is to use open_output() instead of open(). open_output() defaults to "wb" instead of text.

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