9

If I have a script like this:

import sys

def square(x):
    return x*x

def cube(x):
    return x**3

How can I return a list of all the functions defined locally in the program ['square', 'cube'], and not the ones imported.

They are included when I try dir() but so are all the variables and other imported modules. I don't know what to put into dir to refer to the locally executing file.

  • try locals(), but I'm not sure how helpful that would be – inspectorG4dget Aug 26 '13 at 19:26
15
l = []
for key, value in locals().items():
    if callable(value) and value.__module__ == __name__:
        l.append(key)
print l

So a file with the content:

from os.path import join

def square(x):
    return x*x

def cube(x):
    return x**3

l = []
for key, value in locals().items():
    if callable(value) and value.__module__ == __name__:
        l.append(key)
print l

Prints:

['square', 'cube']

Local scopes also work:

def square(x):
    return x*x

def encapsulated():
    from os.path import join

    def cube(x):
        return x**3

    l = []
    for key, value in locals().items():
        if callable(value) and value.__module__ == __name__:
            l.append(key)
    print l

encapsulated()

Prints out only:

['cube']
  • 7
    Even as a one_liner: functions = [name for (name, thing) in locals().items() if callable(thing]) – 9000 Aug 26 '13 at 19:31
  • @user2357112 Updated the answer. – Viktor Kerkez Aug 26 '13 at 19:33
  • I like this solution because it doesn't rely on importing other modules, but when I try this in my actual script, it includes 'value' as an entry in l for some reason that I can't figure out... "Value" doesn't appear elsewhere in the script. – beroe Aug 26 '13 at 20:41
  • @beroe are you doing it twice maybe? – Viktor Kerkez Aug 26 '13 at 20:43
  • 1. If I have the answer of alecxe in the program along with this one, and it prints "value" from his assignment, so I guess it is working but affected by other calls to inspect()? 2 The one-liner by @9000 shows my imported functions too, perhaps because it omits val.__module__ == __name__ (There is also a typo with your closing brackets). This works: functions = [name for (name, thing) in locals().items() if (callable(thing) and thing.__module__ == __name__)] – beroe Aug 26 '13 at 21:15
8

Use inspect module:

def is_function_local(object):
    return isinstance(object, types.FunctionType) and object.__module__ == __name__

import sys
print inspect.getmembers(sys.modules[__name__], predicate=is_function_local)

Example:

import inspect
import types
from os.path import join

def square(x):
    return x*x

def cube(x):
    return x**3

def is_local(object):
    return isinstance(object, types.FunctionType) and object.__module__ == __name__

import sys
print [name for name, value in inspect.getmembers(sys.modules[__name__], predicate=is_local)]

prints:

['cube', 'is_local', 'square']

See: no join function imported from os.path.

is_local is here, since it's a function is the current module. You can move it to another module or exclude it manually, or define a lambda instead (as @BartoszKP suggested).

  • Gives [('cube', <function cube at 0x0294AC70>), ('join', <function join at 0x025A58B0>), ('square', <function square at 0x028BBAB0>)] when from os.path import join added – BartoszKP Aug 26 '13 at 19:40
  • @Marcin: That example only appears to exclude imported functions because built-in functions don't count for inspect.isfunction. The new version works, though. – user2357112 supports Monica Aug 26 '13 at 19:49
  • 1
    I modified is_local to exclude itself, and this works. Thanks. return isinstance(object, types.FunctionType) and object.__module__ == __name__ and object.__name__ !='is_local' – beroe Aug 26 '13 at 20:45
3
import sys
import inspect
from os.path import join

def square(x):
    return x*x

def cube(x):
    return x**3

print inspect.getmembers(sys.modules[__name__], \
      predicate = lambda f: inspect.isfunction(f) and f.__module__ == __name__)

Prints:

[('cube', <function cube at 0x027BAC70>), ('square', <function square at 0x0272BAB0>)]

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