24

This question already has an answer here:

In NumPy, x*x*x is an order of magnitude faster than x**3 or even np.power(x, 3).

x = np.random.rand(1e6)
%timeit x**3
100 loops, best of 3: 7.07 ms per loop

%timeit x*x*x
10000 loops, best of 3: 163 µs per loop

%timeit np.power(x, 3)
100 loops, best of 3: 7.15 ms per loop

Any ideas as to why this behavior happens? As far as I can tell all three yield the same output (checked with np.allclose).

marked as duplicate by Rohit Jain, Viktor Kerkez, Simon O'Hanlon, talonmies, codeling Aug 27 '13 at 6:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Integer vs. float calculations perhaps? – Martijn Pieters Aug 26 '13 at 22:03
  • 1
    @RohitJain I don't think that's a particular useful link. The accepted answer to that question is "use numpy" and the question is about pure Python code, not NumPy. – user395760 Aug 26 '13 at 22:09
  • 1
    @delnam forget the accepted answer look at the top voted answer. – cmd Aug 26 '13 at 22:12
  • @cmd The top rated answer is basically wrong. Taking the power is roughly O(1) since x**y is rewritten as 2**(y*log x). Both 2**a and log a are single floating-point instructions on modern processors. – Jeffrey Sax Aug 26 '13 at 22:29
29

As per this answer, it's because the implementation of exponentiation has some overhead that multiplication does not. However, naive multiplication will get slower and slower as the exponent increases. An empirical demonstration:

 In [3]: x = np.random.rand(1e6)

 In [15]: %timeit x**2
 100 loops, best of 3: 11.9 ms per loop

 In [16]: %timeit x*x
 100 loops, best of 3: 12.7 ms per loop

 In [17]: %timeit x**3
 10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

 In [18]: %timeit x*x*x
 10 loops, best of 3: 27.2 ms per loop

 In [19]: %timeit x**4
 10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

 In [20]: %timeit x*x*x*x
 10 loops, best of 3: 42.4 ms per loop

 In [21]: %timeit x**10
 10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

 In [22]: %timeit x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x
 10 loops, best of 3: 137 ms per loop

 In [24]: %timeit x**15
 10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

 In [25]: %timeit x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x
 1 loops, best of 3: 212 ms per loop

Note the exponentiation time stays more or less constant, except for the x**2 case which I suspect is special-cased, while multiplication gets slower and slower. It seems you could exploit this to get faster integer exponentiation... for example:

In [26]: %timeit x**16
10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

In [27]: %timeit x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x
1 loops, best of 3: 225 ms per loop

In [28]: def tosixteenth(x):
   ....:     x2 = x*x
   ....:     x4 = x2*x2
   ....:     x8 = x4*x4
   ....:     x16 = x8*x8
   ....:     return x16
   ....:

In [29]: %timeit tosixteenth(x)
10 loops, best of 3: 49.5 ms per loop

It seems you could apply this technique generically by splitting any integer into a sum of the powers of two, computing each power of two as above, and summing:

In [93]: %paste
def smartintexp(x, exp):
    result = np.ones(len(x))
    curexp = np.array(x)
    while True:
        if exp%2 == 1:
            result *= curexp
        exp >>= 1
        if not exp: break
        curexp *= curexp
    return result
## -- End pasted text --

In [94]: x
Out[94]:
array([ 0.0163407 ,  0.57694587,  0.47336487, ...,  0.70255032,
        0.62043303,  0.0796748 ])

In [99]: x**21
Out[99]:
array([  3.01080670e-38,   9.63466181e-06,   1.51048544e-07, ...,
         6.02873388e-04,   4.43193256e-05,   8.46721060e-24])

In [100]: smartintexp(x, 21)
Out[100]:
array([  3.01080670e-38,   9.63466181e-06,   1.51048544e-07, ...,
         6.02873388e-04,   4.43193256e-05,   8.46721060e-24])

In [101]: %timeit x**21
10 loops, best of 3: 132 ms per loop

In [102]: %timeit smartintexp(x, 21)
10 loops, best of 3: 70.7 ms per loop

It's fast for small even powers of two:

In [106]: %timeit x**32
10 loops, best of 3: 131 ms per loop

In [107]: %timeit smartintexp(x, 32)
10 loops, best of 3: 57.4 ms per loop

But gets slower as the exponent gets larger:

In [97]: %timeit x**63
10 loops, best of 3: 133 ms per loop

In [98]: %timeit smartintexp(x, 63)
10 loops, best of 3: 110 ms per loop

And not faster for large worst-cases:

In [115]: %timeit x**511
10 loops, best of 3: 135 ms per loop

In [114]: %timeit smartintexp(x, 511)
10 loops, best of 3: 192 ms per loop
  • 8
    You have just discovered exponentiation by squaring... – Jaime Aug 26 '13 at 22:30
  • 1
    @Jaime: indeed (I knew this existed already), and I wonder why numpy doesn't do it that way for integer exponents up to a certain size.. it seems a really easy speed gain – Claudiu Aug 26 '13 at 22:32
  • 1
    @Claudiu One possible reason is that virtually any kind of re-ordering or re-association of float arithmetic can change the results in subtle ways, and for quite a few use cases that is not acceptable. See stackoverflow.com/q/6430448/395760 – user395760 Aug 26 '13 at 22:38
  • 1
    @delnan: ah perhaps. maybe there's standard expectations of pow, and if you want to do it another way (like exponentiation by squaring) you can implement it yourself (as I did here) – Claudiu Aug 26 '13 at 22:40
  • Python 2.7.5 evens out at power 5.; 5 (int) is marginally slower than 5. (float) due to type coercion. – Dima Tisnek Nov 29 '13 at 14:06
7

As a note if you are calculating powers and are worried about speed:

x = np.random.rand(5e7)

%timeit x*x*x
1 loops, best of 3: 522 ms per loop

%timeit np.einsum('i,i,i->i',x,x,x)
1 loops, best of 3: 288 ms per loop

Why einsum is faster is still an open question of mine. Although its like due to einsum able to use SSE2 while numpy's ufuncs will not until 1.8.

In place is even faster:

def calc_power(arr):
    for x in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        arr[x]=arr[x]*arr[x]*arr[x]
numba_power = autojit(calc_power)

%timeit numba_power(x)
10 loops, best of 3: 51.5 ms per loop

%timeit np.einsum('i,i,i->i',x,x,x,out=x)
10 loops, best of 3: 111 ms per loop

%timeit np.power(x,3,out=x)
1 loops, best of 3: 609 ms per loop
  • This is very helpful, thanks! – uhoh Sep 11 '15 at 12:11
3

I expect it is because x**y must handle the generic case where both x and y are floats. Mathematically we can write x**y = exp(y*log(x)). Following your example I find

x = np.random.rand(1e6)
%timeit x**3
10 loops, best of 3: 178 ms per loop

%timeit np.exp(3*np.log(x))
10 loops, best of 3: 176 ms per loop

I have not checked the actual numpy code but it must be doing something like this internally.

1

This is because powers in python are performed as a float operation (this is true for numpy as well, because it uses C).

In C, the pow function provides 3 methods:

double pow (double x, double y)

long powl (long double x, long double y)

float powf (float x, float y)

Each of these are floating point operations.

  • this happens if x is floating, which would be a floating point operation in both cases. Could explain your answer more. – cmd Aug 26 '13 at 22:14
0

According to the spec:

The two-argument form pow(x, y) is equivalent to using the power operator: x**y.

The arguments must have numeric types. With mixed operand types, the coercion rules for binary arithmetic operators apply.

In other words: since x is a float, the exponent is converted from an int to a float, and the generic floating-point power operation is performed. Internally, this is usually rewritten as:

x**y = 2**(y*lg(x))

2**a and lg a (base 2 logarithm of a) are single instructions on modern processors, but it is still takes much longer than a couple of multiplications.

-1
timeit np.multiply(np.multiply(x,x),x)

times the same as x*x*x. My guess is that np.multiply is using fast Fortran linear algebra package like BLAS. I know from another issue that numpy.dot uses BLAS for certain cases.


I have to take that back. np.dot(x,x) is 3x faster than np.sum(x*x). So the speed advantage to np.multiply is not consistent with using BLAS.


With my numpy (times will vary with machine and available libraries)

np.power(x,3.1)
np.exp(3.1*np.log(x))

take about the same time, but

np.power(x,3)

is 2x as fast. Not as fast as x*x*x, but still faster than the general power. So it is taking some advantage of the integer power.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.