This question already has an answer here:

What is the best way to deal with an inheritance structure like this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print('A')

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, foo):
        super(B, self).__init__()
        self.foo = foo
        print('B')

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, bar):
        super(C, self).__init__()
        self.bar = bar
        print('C')

class D(B, C):
    def __init__(self, foo, bar):
        super(D, self).__init__(foo, bar)

Essentially, I want to be able to call:

>>> d = D('bar', 'ram ewe')
>>> d.foo
'bar'
>>> d.bar
'ram ewe'

Currently, the super(D, self).__init__(foo, bar) raises TypeError: __init__() takes exactly 2 arguments (3 given)

EDIT

Working answer, thanks to Daniel Roseman.

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print('A')

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, foo, *args, **kwargs):
        super(B, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.foo = foo
        print('B')

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, bar, *args, **kwargs):
        super(C, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.bar = bar
        print('C')

class D(B, C):
    def __init__(self, foo, bar, *args, **kwargs):
        super(D, self).__init__(foo, bar, *args, **kwargs)

marked as duplicate by Some programmer dude, falsetru, Antti Haapala, Adam Arold, jle Aug 27 '13 at 11:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The best way is to always ensure the methods are both defined and called using the *args, **kwargs syntax. That means they will get the parameters they need and ignore the rest.

  • Thanks :) Worked like a charm! – Josha Inglis Aug 27 '13 at 6:19

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