22

Consider the following ASP.NET Web API Delegating Handler:

public class MyHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, System.Threading.CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var guid = Guid.NewGuid();
        HttpContext.Current.Items["foo"] = guid;

        // An Async operation
        var result = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);

        //All code from this point is not gauranteed to run on the same thread that started the handler

        var restoredGuid = (Guid)HttpContext.Current.Items["foo"];

        //Is this gauranteed to be true
        var areTheSame = guid == restoredGuid;

        return result;
    }
}

The above example is in a delegating handler, the same problem I am trying to fix applies in Controllers, Business Objects, etc.

I am ultimately trying to provide some simple in-memory shared state between various objects per HTTP Request

As I understand it during Async operations the ASP.NET thread originally running the operation is returned to the thread pool and a different thread may be used to finish the request after the Async operation has completed.

Does this affect the HttpContext.Current.Items collection? Is an item that was in the Items collection guaranteed to be there when the Request resumes?

  1. I'm aware that using HttpContext.Current is often frowned upon by the wider community these days for reasons I completely agree with... I'm just helping someone out of a jam.

  2. Storing this data in the Request.Items collection is not suitable to solve this problem as my colleague requires a static due to some poor design decisions.

Many Thanks

5
27

As I understand it during Async operations the ASP.NET thread originally running the operation is returned to the thread pool and a different thread may be used to finish the request after the Async operation has completed.

That is correct. But let's talk about async on ASP.NET for just a minute.

async requires .NET 4.5. Furthermore, ASP.NET 4.5 introduces a "quirks mode" on the server side, and you have to turn the SynchronizationContext quirk off. You can do this by either setting httpRuntime.targetFramework to 4.5 or using an appSettings with aspnet:UseTaskFriendlySynchronizationContext value of true.

If your web.config does not have one of those entries, then the behavior of async is undefined. See this post for more details. I recommend using the targetFramework setting and fixing any problems that come up.

Does this affect the HttpContext.Current.Items collection? Is an item that was in the Items collection guaranteed to be there when the Request resumes?

The AspNetSynchronizationContext preserves the current request context across await points. This includes HttpContext.Current (which includes Items, User, etc).

Another possibility is CallContext.Logical[Get|Set]Data, which also flows across await points. This is useful if you don't want a code dependency on HttpContext, but has slightly more overhead.

I gave a talk at ThatConference a couple weeks ago on async on the server side; you may find the slides helpful, particularly the ones dealing with Context and Thread-Local State.

1
  • Thanks Stephen, great response. – Gavin Osborn Aug 29 '13 at 0:43
6

Cutting a long story short, it normally should. Unless you are using ConfigureAwait(false) which can have a side effect with continuation not flowing the context.

Alternatively try adding this setting in your app.

<appSettings>
    <add key="aspnet:UseTaskFriendlySynchronizationContext" value="true" />
</appSettings>

UPDATE

NOTE!! Initially I put false. But it must be true so that context flows.

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