116

This question already has an answer here:

I have a basic number for loop which increments the variable num by 1 over each iteration...

for (( num=1; num<=5; num++ ))
do
 echo $num
done

Which outputs:

1
2
3
4
5

I'm trying to make it produce the output (add leading zero before $num):

01
02
03
04
05

Without doing:

echo 0$num

marked as duplicate by kenorb, tripleee bash Apr 7 '16 at 5:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Use printf with an appropriate format. – Barmar Aug 27 '13 at 8:04
  • 2
    printf from bash has many bad effect, i prefer use awk as following: "num=$(echo $num | awk '{printf("%02d", $1)}'" – Xavier S. Aug 27 '13 at 8:41
  • @binogure Just a heads up: Awk has different behavior on different systems. There's mawk, gawk, awk, nawk, etc. I try not to recommend it because it seems like I can only test it on the computer I'm writing it on. Perl/Ruby are more compatible. – piojo Aug 27 '13 at 9:43
  • 4
    printf '%s\n' {01..05}. – gniourf_gniourf Feb 5 '15 at 18:18
  • stackoverflow.com/a/18469460/188159 should be set as the answer. – qubodup Apr 20 '15 at 3:49
187

Use the following syntax:

$ for i in {01..05}; do echo "$i"; done
01
02
03
04
05

If you want to use printf, nothing prevents you from putting its result in a variable for further use:

$ foo=$(printf "%02d" 5)
$ echo "${foo}"
05

Disclaimer: This only works in >=bash-4.

  • 2
    Best answer, and it avoids using clumsy external commands (like 'seq', not necessary in proper Bash). Helped me. – Crossfit_and_Beer Jan 28 '15 at 20:31
  • 6
    Unfortunately the {01..05} doesn't work for older versions of bash. I'm on a server with bash 3.2.51 and that will print the numbers without leading zeroes. On my desktop with 4.2.37 it does work well though. – thomanski Feb 13 '15 at 16:04
  • @thomanski Fair point, the Changelog states that this feature got introduced with bash-4.0-alpha: Brace expansion now allows zero-padding of expanded numeric values and will add the proper number of zeroes to make sure all values contain he same number of digits.). – Adrian Frühwirth Feb 13 '15 at 18:56
  • doesn't work for e.g. {01..10} though – Matt Dec 21 '18 at 13:05
  • @Matt What exactly does not work? As long as you have a recent enough version of bash this works fine. – Adrian Frühwirth Jan 10 at 8:34
43

seq -w will detect width and normalize it.

for num in $(seq -w 01 05); do
    ...
done

Apparently this doesn't work on the newest versions of iOS, so you can either install macports and use its version of seq, or you can set the format explicitly:

seq -f '%02g' 1 3
    01
    02
    03

But given the ugliness of format specifications for such a simple problem, I prefer the solution Henk and Adrian gave, which just uses Bash. Apple can't screw this up since there's no generic "unix" version of Bash:

echo {01..05}

Or:

for number in {01..05}; do ...; done
  • 3
    Just fyi seq is not present on OSX – anubhava Aug 27 '13 at 9:29
  • 2
    It's on my machine (OS X 10.7.5). The man page only dates to 2010, so it looks to be a (relatively) recent addition. – chepner Aug 27 '13 at 13:00
  • 1
    doesnt work on mac os sierra for 01 to 05. but works for 01 to 10. – at0mzk Oct 6 '16 at 2:34
  • 2
    Try giving seq a format string. seq -f '%02g' 1 5 – blarf Oct 6 '16 at 20:40
  • @blarf I mentioned that in the middle of my answer, but I'm generally opposed to format strings for very simple formats like this. – piojo Oct 12 '16 at 13:32
28

Use printf command to have 0 padding:

printf "%02d\n" $num

Your for loop will be like this:

for (( num=1; num<=5; num++ )); do printf "%02d\n" $num; done
01
02
03
04
05
  • I'm not interested in outputting it to the screen (that's what printf is mainly used for, right?) The variable $num is going to be used as a parameter for another program but let me see what I can do with this. – Bruce Blacklaws Aug 27 '13 at 8:13
  • Please explain clearly what you are trying to do than I can suggest a better suited answer. – anubhava Aug 27 '13 at 8:36
  • 2
    @BruceBlacklaws printf in the shell is used for creating strings from a list of arguments. Output to screen is just the default. In fact, shell pipelines are the ultimate example of functional programming -- just input, output, no side-effects. ;-) – Henk Langeveld Aug 27 '13 at 19:54
15

I'm not interested in outputting it to the screen (that's what printf is mainly used for, right?) The variable $num is going to be used as a parameter for another program but let me see what I can do with this.

You can still use printf:

for num in {1..5}
do
   value=$(printf "%02d" $num)
   ... Use $value for your purposes
done
  • 3
    This works but spawning subshell is expensive. For big sequences it may take very long time. – rr- Apr 4 '15 at 21:16
8

From bash 4.0 onward, you can use Brace Expansion with fixed length strings. See below for the original announcement.

It will do just what you need, and does not require anything external to the shell.

$ echo {01..05}
01 02 03 04 05

for num in {01..05}
do
  echo $num
done
01
02
03
04
05

CHANGES, release bash-4.0, section 3

This is a terse description of the new features added to bash-4.0 since the release of bash-3.2.

. . .

z. Brace expansion now allows zero-padding of expanded numeric values and will add the proper number of zeroes to make sure all values contain the same number of digits.

  • I know I did not specify which version of BASH and what platform it's running on but this flat fails on GNU bash, version 3.2.57(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin16) – Bruce Blacklaws Mar 15 '17 at 13:09
  • @BruceBlacklaws Correct. The fixed length numbers were added in 4.0. Included the restriction. – Henk Langeveld Mar 16 '17 at 23:18
6

why not printf '%02d' $num? See help printf for this internal bash command.

  • This solution is much better (more straightforward)! This should be accepted answer! – neverMind9 Dec 4 '18 at 4:12
1

Just a note: I have experienced different behaviours on different versions of bash:

  • version 3.1.17(1)-release-(x86_64-suse-linux) and
  • Version 4.1.17(9)-release (x86_64-unknown-cygwin))

for the former (3.1) for nn in (00..99) ; do ... works but for nn in (000..999) ; do ... does not work both will work on version 4.1 ; haven't tested printf behaviour (bash --version gave the version info)

Cheers, Jan

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