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Some of the windows services will start only after restarting the pc where as some start as soon as software is installed.

For example sql server(instance name) will start as soon as it is installed. Some other service requires restart.After restarting that computer it will start appearing in services.msc. Does it done by using registry? I got a link related to registry of services .But i am not able to track which one does it? Is it registry or something else? (Setting service to manual or automatic is different,my question is about service added during the install of software for the first time)

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Does the service fail to start or does it fail to appear in the list of services? –  Christopher Painter Aug 27 '13 at 12:58

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You shouldn't be directly manipulating the registry to create a service. You should be using the service control manager API's to create and if desired start the service. The registry values are documented but they are still private to the API and only take effect upon reboot. Using the API will take affect immediately and the registry changes are done by the API.

If you are using Windows Installer you can let the installer handle all of this for you by using the Windows Installer's ServiceInstall and ServiceControl tables.

Some services have dependencies on resources that aren't available until after a reboot. One example might be a locked file that will be overwritten during startup via the Pending Files Rename Operations pattern. Another gotcha is if the service has a dependency on a system environment variable. After updating the registry to set the environment you are supposed to send a message to the broadcast address informing all processes on a settings change. Unfortunately the service control manager ignores these messages so it takes a reboot to catch up.

Other examples would be on a case by case basis.

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