41

(edit: Perhaps I am wrong in what this error means. Is this indicating that the connection pool at my CLIENT is full? or a connection pool at the SERVER is full and this is the error my client is being given?)

I am attempting to make a large number of http requests concurrently using the python threading and requests module. I am seeing this error in logs:

WARNING:requests.packages.urllib3.connectionpool:HttpConnectionPool is full, discarding connection:

What can I do to increase the size of the connection pool for requests?

82

This should do the trick:

import requests
sess = requests.Session()
adapter = requests.adapters.HTTPAdapter(pool_connections=100, pool_maxsize=100)
sess.mount('http://', adapter)
resp = sess.get("/mypage")
  • 5
    This works for me. It should be marked as the correct answer. – reish Jan 21 '14 at 15:25
  • That worked after replacing http with https. Also I think pool_connections is unnecessary. – lfk Apr 5 '18 at 0:31
  • Does each session have its own connection pool or do multiple sessions share a connection pool? – lfk Apr 5 '18 at 0:32
19

Note: Use this solution only if you cannot control the construction of the connection pool (as described in @Jahaja's answer).

The problem is that the urllib3 creates the pools on demand. It calls the constructor of the urllib3.connectionpool.HTTPConnectionPool class without parameters. The classes are registered in urllib3 .poolmanager.pool_classes_by_scheme. The trick is to replace the classes with your classes that have different default parameters:

def patch_http_connection_pool(**constructor_kwargs):
    """
    This allows to override the default parameters of the 
    HTTPConnectionPool constructor.
    For example, to increase the poolsize to fix problems 
    with "HttpConnectionPool is full, discarding connection"
    call this function with maxsize=16 (or whatever size 
    you want to give to the connection pool)
    """
    from urllib3 import connectionpool, poolmanager

    class MyHTTPConnectionPool(connectionpool.HTTPConnectionPool):
        def __init__(self, *args,**kwargs):
            kwargs.update(constructor_kwargs)
            super(MyHTTPConnectionPool, self).__init__(*args,**kwargs)
    poolmanager.pool_classes_by_scheme['http'] = MyHTTPConnectionPool

Then you can call to set new default parameters. Make sure this is called before any connection is made.

patch_http_connection_pool(maxsize=16)

If you use https connections you can create a similar function:

def patch_https_connection_pool(**constructor_kwargs):
    """
    This allows to override the default parameters of the
    HTTPConnectionPool constructor.
    For example, to increase the poolsize to fix problems
    with "HttpSConnectionPool is full, discarding connection"
    call this function with maxsize=16 (or whatever size
    you want to give to the connection pool)
    """
    from urllib3 import connectionpool, poolmanager

    class MyHTTPSConnectionPool(connectionpool.HTTPSConnectionPool):
        def __init__(self, *args,**kwargs):
            kwargs.update(constructor_kwargs)
            super(MyHTTPSConnectionPool, self).__init__(*args,**kwargs)
    poolmanager.pool_classes_by_scheme['https'] = MyHTTPSConnectionPool
  • 1
    Requests has a built-in API for supplying ConnectionPool constructor params, patching the constructor is unnecessary. (See @Jahaja's answer.) – shazow May 11 '14 at 18:18
  • 5
    It depends on the context. If you have control over creating the HTTPAdapter, using the constructor is the correct solution. But there are cases where the connection pool is initialised somewhere deeply buried in some framework or library. In those cases you can patch the library or patch the connection pool constructor as I have described above. – Michael_Scharf May 12 '14 at 12:21
  • I added a clarification to my solution. – Michael_Scharf May 12 '14 at 12:30
  • 1
    Yes it may be the answer to a different question, but this is the question that I found when I searched for something like: HttpConnectionPool is full, discarding connection python. But the solution did not help me, because my connection pool is created by some library (in my case pyes). – Michael_Scharf May 13 '14 at 1:06
  • 1
    @shazow, firstly ConnectionPool is just a base class and the only thing you can do is to subclass it, but not passing pool_maxsize or any other (only host and port). And secondly, the initial question was addressed exactly to requests/urllib3 library, cause it is the best pythonic solution for handling HTTP, so I don't see any prohibitions answering specifically in the context of those libs – Alex-Bogdanov Jul 19 '17 at 13:26

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