5

I created a caesar shift program in python, see below:

from string import maketrans

originalChar = (raw_input("Enter a letter: "))
numToInc = int(raw_input("Enter a number: "))
code = ""

for x in originalChar:
    newChar = (chr(ord(x) + numToInc))
    code = code + newChar

transtab = maketrans(chr(32+numToInc), " ")
print code.translate(transtab)

I have to shift the following code:

%%$@_$^__#)^)&!_+]!*@&^}@[@%]()%+$&[(_@%+%$*^@$^!+]!&_#)_*}{}}!}_]$[%}@[{_@#_^{*
@##&{#&{&)*%(]{{([*}@[@&]+!!*{)!}{%+{))])[!^})+)$]#{*+^((@^@}$[**$&^{$!@#$%)!@(&
+^!{%_$&@^!}$_${)$_#)!({@!)(^}!*^&!$%_&&}&_#&@{)]{+)%*{&*%*&@%$+]!*__(#!*){%&@++
!_)^$&&%#+)}!@!)&^}**#!_$([$!$}#*^}$+&#[{*{}{((#$]{[$[$$()_#}!@}^@_&%^*!){*^^_$^

As you can see, it contains comments.

How do I make that code into a string? The comments are stopping my python script from giving any output.

Thanks

4

Tripple quote it:

"""%%$@_$^__#)^)&!_+]!*@&^}@[@%]()%+$&[(_@%+%$*^@$^!+]!&_#)_*}{}}!}_]$[%}@[{_@#_^{*
@##&{#&{&)*%(]{{([*}@[@&]+!!*{)!}{%+{))])[!^})+)$]#{*+^((@^@}$[**$&^{$!@#$%)!@(&
+^!{%_$&@^!}$_${)$_#)!({@!)(^}!*^&!$%_&&}&_#&@{)]{+)%*{&*%*&@%$+]!*__(#!*){%&@++
!_)^$&&%#+)}!@!)&^}**#!_$([$!$}#*^}$+&#[{*{}{((#$]{[$[$$()_#}!@}^@_&%^*!){*^^_$^"""

Triple quoted strings can span multiple lines as well as have comments in them.

2
  • Thanks, that works. Can't believe I didn't think to try that. Multi-line string. Thanks iCodez. Will accept as correct answer. Aug 27 '13 at 14:55
  • If you need to handle arbitrary input (not just the input sample shown), the triple-quote approach doesn't work in general. Example, if the code contains sequences that are interpreted as Python escape sequences such as \n (newline), \u0020 (unicode space) or many others, you will not get a verbatim, character-for-character version of the original code. You need to use a leading r outside the triple-quotes. See my answer for an example of this behavior. Nov 10 '13 at 21:53
1

Surround the input text between triple quotes: """your code"""

1
  • If you need to handle arbitrary input (not just the input sample shown), the triple-quote approach doesn't work in general. Example, if the code contains sequences that are interpreted as Python escape sequences such as \n (newline), \u0020 (unicode space) or many others, you will not get a verbatim, character-for-character version of the original code. You need to use a leading r outside the triple-quotes. See my answer for an example of this behavior. Nov 10 '13 at 21:53
1

The triple-quote approach won't work if your source string contains Python escape characters. For example, the sequence \n means newline, and is interpreted (correctly) as one character, not two.

If you want a general solution in which all the characters provided in your input are captured as-is and without escaping / interpretation, use the raw string approach via a leading r outside the quotes:

>>> s = '\n\n\n'
>>> print len(s)
3

vs.

>>> r = r'\n\n\n'
>>> print len(r)
6

No special cases to worry about.

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