3

I have file which has a series of numbers : 9 1 2 1

I try to findout the ratios subsum/sum

#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{ 
    double subSum = 0;
    double sum    = 13;
    double num    = 0;
    double x      = 0;
    FILE*  file   = fopen("text.txt", "r");

    while (fscanf(file, "%f", &num) > 0)
    {
        subSum = subSum + num;
        x      = subSum / sum;

        printf("%f",x);
        printf("\n");
    }

    fclose(file);
}

but it keeps printing zeros(0.00000000000) why ???

2
  • 1
    error check after fopen.
    – sujin
    Aug 27 '13 at 20:32
  • 3
    Please, haven't you tried a debugger, or the good old printf's, to see where things go wrong. Really, this program is so simple, have you really tried everything? Aug 27 '13 at 20:34
6

You're passing the address of a double variable to a scanf() format that has been told to expect the address of a float.

while (fscanf(file, "%f", &num) > 0)

should be:

while (fscanf(file, "%lf", &num) > 0)
0
#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{ 
double subSum=0;
double sum=13;
int num=0;
double x=0;
FILE *file = fopen("text.txt", "r");
while(fscanf(file, "%d", &num) > 0){
    subSum=subSum+(double)num;
    x= subSum / sum;
    printf("%f",x);
    printf("\n");
 }
fclose(file);
}
1
  • Using %d with a double is as bad as using %f with a double. Use %d to read a decimal integer. Use %lf to read a double. And don't use void main(), even if the question does. It isn't legitimate according to the C standard or the Microsoft web site. Aug 27 '13 at 21:31
0

If your C compiler does NOT support "%lf", then:

 float  num;
 double dnum;

 // etc.

 scanf("%f", &num);

 //etc.

 dnum = (double) num;  // use dnum in calculations
1
  • I don't think I've ever come across a C compiler that supported float but did not support double (or vice versa). Once upon a long time ago, there were systems without a floating point unit, and sometimes the libraries omitted all support for floating point — or used software floating point if you requested it. But that was a long time ago, in the days of 80386 (without the companion 80387 FPU), and maybe the 80486 SX chips. Aug 27 '13 at 21:37

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