94

I'm writing a script in UNIX where I have to check whether the first character in a string is "/" and if it is, branch.

For example I have a string:

/some/directory/file

I want this to return 1, and:

server@10.200.200.20:/some/directory/file

to return 0.

1
164

Many ways to do this. You could use wildcards in double brackets:

str="/some/directory/file"
if [[ $str == /* ]]; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi

You can use substring expansion:

if [[ ${str:0:1} == "/" ]] ; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi

Or a regex:

if [[ $str =~ ^/ ]]; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi
1
  • 21
    To short, use: ${str::1}.
    – kenorb
    Jun 29 '18 at 13:47
19

Consider the case statement as well which is compatible with most sh-based shells:

case $str in
/*)
    echo 1
    ;;
*)
    echo 0
    ;;
esac
4
12
$ foo="/some/directory/file"
$ [ ${foo:0:1} == "/" ] && echo 1 || echo 0
1
$ foo="server@10.200.200.20:/some/directory/file"
$ [ ${foo:0:1} == "/" ] && echo 1 || echo 0
0
5
  • 5
    Downvote! You forgot to quote your variable in single braces. foo='*'; [ ${foo:0:1} == "/" ] && echo 1 || echo 0 is going to output this error bash: [: too many arguments. Use [ "${foo:0:1}" == "/" ] && echo 1 || echo 0 or even better [[ ${foo:0:1} == "/" ]] && echo 1 || echo 0 Aug 28 '13 at 14:31
  • @Aleks-DanielJakimenko-A. - devnull's answer works without error in "GNU bash, version 4.3.48(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu) Copyright (C) 2013 Free Software Foundation, Inc." Apr 20 '18 at 11:20
  • Your initial expression: "Downvote! You forgot to quote your variable in single braces." implies that the expressions entered in devnulls answer won't work as is on bash. You need to modify that initial expression in order to properly deliver your technical point, otherwise it isn't logically correct. Apr 21 '18 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Aleks-DanielJakimenko-A. Downvote on a typo? Really?
    – Mausy5043
    Aug 5 '18 at 6:56
  • 2
    @Mausy5043 it's not a “typo”, it is buggy and incorrect. Aug 6 '18 at 8:57
7

cut -c1

This is POSIX, and unlike case actually extracts the first char if you need it for later:

myvar=abc
first_char="$(printf '%s' "$myvar" | cut -c1)"
if [ "$first_char" = a ]; then
  echo 'starts with a'
else
  echo 'does not start with a'
fi

awk substr is another POSIX but less efficient alternative:

printf '%s' "$myvar" | awk '{print substr ($0, 0, 1)}'

printf '%s' is to avoid problems with escape characters: https://stackoverflow.com/a/40423558/895245 e.g.:

myvar='\n'
printf '%s' "$myvar" | cut -c1

outputs \ as expected.

${::} does not seem to be POSIX.

See also: How to extract the first two characters of a string in shell scripting?

2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.