3

I have a class tree I want to store in fabric. I see how to implement fabric for elements with empty or predefined constructor yet I fail to see how to make it possible to get around with not predefined constructor arguments signature. So say we register diferent types into factory in a way that does not affect factory class directly. And our factory looks like this:

Factory.hpp:

#include <unordered_map>
#include <string>

template<class BaseType, class BaseTypeCode>
class Factory {
public:
    typedef BaseType * (*base_creator_fn)();
    typedef std::unordered_map<BaseTypeCode, base_creator_fn> registry_map;

    static registry_map & registry() {
        static registry_map impl;
        return impl;
    }

    static BaseType * instantiate(BaseTypeCode const & name) {
        auto it = registry().find(name);
        return it == registry().end() ? nullptr : (it->second)();
    }

    virtual ~Factory() = default;        
};

template<class BaseClass,  class BaseTypeCode>
struct Registrar {
    Registrar(BaseTypeCode name, Factory<BaseClass>::base_creator_fn func) {
        Factory<BaseClass>::registry()[name] = func;
    }
};

So the question is: How to make a typedef to a typedef BaseType * (*base_creator_fn)(...); instead of current (), secondly how to forward arguments in instantiate that would be taking in (BaseTypeCode const & name, ...) and lastly how to get that new base_creator_fn out from constructors that take const ammount of arguments?

So I hope to get something like this as usage example at the end:

Example.hpp:

#include "Factory.hpp"

enum ExampleTypeCode { ExampleTypeCode_Simple = 1 };

class ExampleBase {
    virtual ~ExampleBase(){}
};

class Example : public ExampleBase {
    Example(int i) {}
    virtual ~Example(){}

    static Registrar<ExampleBase, ExampleTypeCode> registrar;
};

Example.cpp:

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda.hpp>
#include "Example.hpp"

Registrar<Example, ExampleTypeCode> Example::registrar(ExampleTypeCode_Simple, boost::bind(boost::lambda::new_ptr<Example>, _firstVarArg));

Main.cpp

#include "Example.hpp"

int main() {
    ExampleBase * p = Base::instantiate(ExampleTypeCode_Simple, 1);
}

My main compilation targets are latest GCC and sadly Visual Studio 2012 with latest service pack - so C++11 subset is quite limited yet presented.

3
  • I think you have to use some sort of type-erasure. Can you use C++11, BTW? Aug 28, 2013 at 15:51
  • BTW, Example is not derived from ExampleBase. Also, there seems to be typo in Example.cpp file. Please fix these issues first. Aug 28, 2013 at 15:57
  • @Nswaz: Fixed some typos, VS2012 main pain... so some C++11 yet not nearly all of it.
    – DuckQueen
    Aug 28, 2013 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

8

Variadic template can help here. I used void* as the second type of registry_map so that we could store any type of function in the registry. Here is a minimal code that demonstrates the basic idea:

class Base
{
public:
    typedef std::unordered_map<std::string, void*> registry_map;

    virtual ~Base() = default;

    static registry_map & registry()
    {
        static registry_map impl;
        return impl;
    }
    template<typename ...T>
    static Base * instantiate(std::string const & name, T&&...args)
    {
        auto it = registry().find(name);
        if ( it == registry().end()) return 0;
        typedef Base* (*create_type)(T...);
        auto create_fun = reinterpret_cast<create_type>(it->second);
        return create_fun(args...);
    }
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

struct Registrar
{
    template<typename F>
    Registrar(std::string name, F func)
    {
        Base::registry()[name] = reinterpret_cast<void*>(func);
    }
};

And here goes the test code: I've defined two derived classes, one of which takes two arguments on creation and the other doesn't take any argument.

class DerivedExample : public Base
{
    static Registrar registrar;
public:
    static Base * create() { return new DerivedExample; }
    virtual void f() override { std::cout << "DerivedExample" << std::endl; }
};

Registrar DerivedExample::registrar("DerivedExample", DerivedExample::create);

class AnotherExample : public Base
{
    static Registrar registrar;
    int a;
    const char *b;
public:
    AnotherExample(int a, const char *b) : a(a), b(b) {}
    static Base * create(int a, const char *b) { return new AnotherExample(a,b); }
    virtual void f() override { std::cout << "AnotherExample. a = " << a << ", b = " << b << std::endl; }
};

Registrar AnotherExample::registrar("AnotherExample", AnotherExample::create);

int main()
{
    Base * p = Base::instantiate("DerivedExample");
    Base * q = Base::instantiate("AnotherExample", 10, "Mahfuza");
    p->f();
    q->f();

    delete p;
    delete q;
}

Output (demo online):

DerivedExample
AnotherExample. a = 10, b = Mahfuza

Hope that helps. :-)

2
  • Hello, grate answer, thank you for void* idea! Could you please show how could variable length arguments forvarding be done in C++03/C?
    – DuckQueen
    Aug 28, 2013 at 17:14
  • @DuckQueen: To support variable arguments in C++03, you need to add overloaded function template in the code. Just see how the current code works, that would give you some idea how it can be done in C++03. Aug 28, 2013 at 17:17
3

You can combine your factory with a builder to get the behavior that you want. The builder would hold the parameters.

template<class BaseType, class BaseTypeCode, class BaseTypeBuilder>
class Factory {
public:
    typedef BaseType * (*base_creator_fn)(BaseTypeBuilder const &);
    //...
    static BaseType * instantiate(BaseTypeCode const & name,
                                  BaseTypeBuilder const & builder
                                  = BaseTypeBuilder()) {
        auto it = registry().find(name);
        return it == registry().end() ? nullptr : (it->second)(builder);
    }

    virtual ~Factory() = default;        
};

Then, for your Example, you create an builder. The builder can be as complex as you need it to be to help distinguish which constructor needs to be called:

class ExampleBuilder {
    boost::optional<int> i;

public:
    ExampleBuilder () {}

    void set_i (int x) { i = x; }

    static Example * create (const ExampleBuilder &builder) {
        if (builder.i) return new Example(builder.i);
        else return new Example();
    }
};

Registrar<Example, ExampleTypeCode, ExampleBuilder>
    Example::registrar(ExampleTypeCode_Simple, ExampleBuilder::create);

    ExampleBuilder build;
    build.set_i(1);
    ExampleBase * p = Base::instantiate(ExampleTypeCode_Simple, build);

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