64

I'm trying to figure out how to structure my application to use MySQL most efficent way. I'm using node-mysql module. Other threads here suggested to use connection pooling so i set up a little module mysql.js

var mysql = require('mysql');

var pool  = mysql.createPool({
    host     : 'localhost',
    user     : 'root',
    password : 'root',
    database : 'guess'
});

exports.pool = pool;

Now whenever I want to query mysql I require this module and then query the databse

var mysql = require('../db/mysql').pool;

var test = function(req, res) {
     mysql.getConnection(function(err, conn){
         conn.query("select * from users", function(err, rows) {
              res.json(rows);
         })
     })
}

Is this good approach? I couldn't really find too much examples of using mysql connections besides very simple one where everything is done in main app.js script so I don't really know what the convention / best practices are.

Should I always use connection.end() after each query? What if I forget about it somewhere?

How to rewrite the exports part of my mysql module to return just a connection so I don't have to write getConnection() every time?

48

It's a good approach.

If you just want to get a connection add the following code to your module where the pool is in:

var getConnection = function(callback) {
    pool.getConnection(function(err, connection) {
        callback(err, connection);
    });
};

module.exports = getConnection;

You still have to write getConnection every time. But you could save the connection in the module the first time you get it.

Don't forget to end the connection when you are done using it:

connection.release();
  • 11
    Just a heads up. It's connection.release(); now, for pools. – sdanzig Dec 10 '13 at 17:47
  • That's true. I changed it. – Klaasvaak Dec 11 '13 at 9:45
  • Also, if I may, I would suggest using a promise instead of callback, but that's just a preference... great solution nonetheless – Spock Dec 31 '14 at 22:42
  • @Spock can you link to an example of this? Express promises are kind of annoying to work with so far, I think I'm missing something. So far I can only use var deferred = q.defer() and then resolve or reject, but that seems like a lot of overhead for something so simple. If so, thanks :) – PixMach Jan 30 '15 at 1:28
  • I'm, sorry about this late answer. Here is how I use promises to get a connection. I know it's a hazzle but consuming promises is so much nicer, I hate callbacks :) .. code var getConnection = function() { var deferred = Q.defer(); pool.getConnection(function(err, connection) { if(err) { deferred.reject(err); } else { deferred.resolve connection); } }); return deferred.promise; }; – Spock Apr 21 '15 at 9:37
12

You will find this wrapper usefull :)

var pool = mysql.createPool(config.db);

exports.connection = {
    query: function () {
        var queryArgs = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments),
            events = [],
            eventNameIndex = {};

        pool.getConnection(function (err, conn) {
            if (err) {
                if (eventNameIndex.error) {
                    eventNameIndex.error();
                }
            }
            if (conn) { 
                var q = conn.query.apply(conn, queryArgs);
                q.on('end', function () {
                    conn.release();
                });

                events.forEach(function (args) {
                    q.on.apply(q, args);
                });
            }
        });

        return {
            on: function (eventName, callback) {
                events.push(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments));
                eventNameIndex[eventName] = callback;
                return this;
            }
        };
    }
};

Require it, use it like this:

db.connection.query("SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE `id` = ? ", row_id)
          .on('result', function (row) {
            setData(row);
          })
          .on('error', function (err) {
            callback({error: true, err: err});
          });
7

I am using this base class connection with mysql:

"base.js"

var mysql   = require("mysql");

var pool = mysql.createPool({
    connectionLimit : 10,
    host: Config.appSettings().database.host,
    user: Config.appSettings().database.username,
    password: Config.appSettings().database.password,
    database: Config.appSettings().database.database
});


var DB = (function () {

    function _query(query, params, callback) {
        pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
            if (err) {
                connection.release();
                callback(null, err);
                throw err;
            }

            connection.query(query, params, function (err, rows) {
                connection.release();
                if (!err) {
                    callback(rows);
                }
                else {
                    callback(null, err);
                }

            });

            connection.on('error', function (err) {
                connection.release();
                callback(null, err);
                throw err;
            });
        });
    };

    return {
        query: _query
    };
})();

module.exports = DB;

Just use it like that:

var DB = require('../dal/base.js');

DB.query("select * from tasks", null, function (data, error) {
   callback(data, error);
});
  • 1
    What if the query's err is true? shouldn't it still call callback with null parameter to indicate there is some error in the query? – Joe Huang Feb 2 '17 at 0:41
  • Yes, you write, need to bubble up callback with the query error – Sagi Tsofan Feb 3 '17 at 9:41
  • Nice one. But you should add an else condition like this: if (!err) { callback(rows, err); } else { callback(null, err); } else your application might hang. Because connection.on('error', callback2) won't take care of all "errors". Thanks! – Tadej Apr 4 '17 at 13:14
  • exactly, i added this fix – Sagi Tsofan Apr 5 '17 at 17:05
6

You should avoid using pool.getConnection() if you can. If you call pool.getConnection(), you must call connection.release() when you are done using the connection. Otherwise, you application will get stuck waiting forever for connections to be returned to the pool once you hit the connection limit.

For simple queries, you can use pool.query(). This shorthand will automatically call connection.release() for you—even in error conditions.

function doSomething(cb) {
  pool.query('SELECT 2*2 "value"', (ex, rows) => {
    if (ex) {
      cb(ex);
    } else {
      cb(null, rows[0].value);
    }
  });
}

However, in some cases you must use pool.getConnection(). These cases include:

  1. Making multiple queries within a transaction.
  2. Sharing data objects such as temporary tables between subsequent queries.

If you must use pool.getConnection(), ensure you call connection.release() using a pattern similar to below:

function doSomething(cb) {
  pool.getConnection((ex, connection) => {
    if (ex) {
      cb(ex);
    } else {
      // Ensure that any call to cb releases the connection
      // by wrapping it.
      cb = (cb => {
        return function () {
          connection.release();
          cb.apply(this, arguments);
        };
      })(cb);
      connection.beginTransaction(ex => {
        if (ex) {
          cb(ex);
        } else {
          connection.query('INSERT INTO table1 ("value") VALUES (\'my value\');', ex => {
            if (ex) {
              cb(ex);
            } else {
              connection.query('INSERT INTO table2 ("value") VALUES (\'my other value\')', ex => {
                if (ex) {
                  cb(ex);
                } else {
                  connection.commit(ex => {
                    cb(ex);
                  });
                }
              });
            }
          });
        }
      });
    }
  });
}

I personally prefer to use Promises and the useAsync() pattern. This pattern combined with async/await makes it a lot harder to accidentally forget to release() the connection because it turns your lexical scoping into an automatic call to .release():

async function usePooledConnectionAsync(actionAsync) {
  const connection = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    pool.getConnection((ex, connection) => {
      if (ex) {
        reject(ex);
      } else {
        resolve(connection);
      }
    });
  });
  try {
    return await actionAsync(connection);
  } finally {
    connection.release();
  }
}

async function doSomethingElse() {
  // Usage example:
  const result = await usePooledConnectionAsync(async connection => {
    const rows = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      connection.query('SELECT 2*4 "value"', (ex, rows) => {
        if (ex) {
          reject(ex);
        } else {
          resolve(rows);
        }
      });
    });
    return rows[0].value;
  });
  console.log(`result=${result}`);
}
1

When you are done with a connection, just call connection.release() and the connection will return to the pool, ready to be used again by someone else.

var mysql = require('mysql');
var pool  = mysql.createPool(...);

pool.getConnection(function(err, connection) {
  // Use the connection
  connection.query('SELECT something FROM sometable', function (error, results, fields) {
    // And done with the connection.
    connection.release();

    // Handle error after the release.
    if (error) throw error;

    // Don't use the connection here, it has been returned to the pool.
  });
});

If you would like to close the connection and remove it from the pool, use connection.destroy() instead. The pool will create a new connection the next time one is needed.

Source: https://github.com/mysqljs/mysql

0

Using the standard mysql.createPool(), connections are lazily created by the pool. If you configure the pool to allow up to 100 connections, but only ever use 5 simultaneously, only 5 connections will be made. However if you configure it for 500 connections and use all 500 they will remain open for the durations of the process, even if they are idle!

This means if your MySQL Server max_connections is 510 your system will only have 10 mySQL connections available until your MySQL Server closes them (depends on what you have set your wait_timeout to) or your application closes! The only way to free them up is to manually close the connections via the pool instance or close the pool.

mysql-connection-pool-manager module was created to fix this issue and automatically scale the number of connections dependant on the load. Inactive connections are closed and idle connection pools are eventually closed if there has not been any activity.

    // Load modules
const PoolManager = require('mysql-connection-pool-manager');

// Options
const options = {
  ...example settings
}

// Initialising the instance
const mySQL = PoolManager(options);

// Accessing mySQL directly
var connection = mySQL.raw.createConnection({
  host     : 'localhost',
  user     : 'me',
  password : 'secret',
  database : 'my_db'
});

// Initialising connection
connection.connect();

// Performing query
connection.query('SELECT 1 + 1 AS solution', function (error, results, fields) {
  if (error) throw error;
  console.log('The solution is: ', results[0].solution);
});

// Ending connection
connection.end();

Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/mysql-connection-pool-manager

-5

i always use connection.relase(); after pool.getconnetion like

pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
      connection.release();
        if (!err)
        {
            console.log('*** Mysql Connection established with ', config.database, ' and connected as id ' + connection.threadId);
            //CHECKING USERNAME EXISTENCE
            email = receivedValues.email
            connection.query('SELECT * FROM users WHERE email = ?', [email],
                function (err, rows) {
                    if (!err)
                    {
                        if (rows.length == 1)
                        {
                            if (bcrypt.compareSync(req.body.password, rows[0].password))
                            {
                                var alldata = rows;
                                var userid = rows[0].id;
                                var tokendata = (receivedValues, userid);
                                var token = jwt.sign(receivedValues, config.secret, {
                                    expiresIn: 1440 * 60 * 30 // expires in 1440 minutes
                                });
                                console.log("*** Authorised User");
                                res.json({
                                    "code": 200,
                                    "status": "Success",
                                    "token": token,
                                    "userData": alldata,
                                    "message": "Authorised User!"
                                });
                                logger.info('url=', URL.url, 'Responce=', 'User Signin, username', req.body.email, 'User Id=', rows[0].id);
                                return;
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                console.log("*** Redirecting: Unauthorised User");
                                res.json({"code": 200, "status": "Fail", "message": "Unauthorised User!"});
                                logger.error('*** Redirecting: Unauthorised User');
                                return;
                            }
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            console.error("*** Redirecting: No User found with provided name");
                            res.json({
                                "code": 200,
                                "status": "Error",
                                "message": "No User found with provided name"
                            });
                            logger.error('url=', URL.url, 'No User found with provided name');
                            return;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        console.log("*** Redirecting: Error for selecting user");
                        res.json({"code": 200, "status": "Error", "message": "Error for selecting user"});
                        logger.error('url=', URL.url, 'Error for selecting user', req.body.email);
                        return;
                    }
                });
            connection.on('error', function (err) {
                console.log('*** Redirecting: Error Creating User...');
                res.json({"code": 200, "status": "Error", "message": "Error Checking Username Duplicate"});
                return;
            });
        }
        else
        {
            Errors.Connection_Error(res);
        }
    });
  • anything wrong with this?? – Alex Sep 1 '16 at 15:30
  • 6
    Don't think you should be releasing the connection before you use it to query – kwhitley Dec 28 '16 at 17:44
  • 1
    Yes, this is bad news .... its a side effect of the async nature of things that you are getting away with this release. If you introduce some latency you won't see that query. The pattern is ... pool.getConnection(function(err, connection) { // Use the connection connection.query('SELECT something FROM sometable', function (error, results, fields) { // And done with the connection. connection.release(); // Handle error after the release. if (error) throw error; npmjs.com/package/mysql#pooling-connections – hpavc May 10 '17 at 20:09

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