18

I have this statement as a few lines:

    return render_to_response('foo/page.html',
        {
            'situations': situations,
            'active': active_req,
        },
        context_instance=RequestContext(request))

As it stands, using the PEP8 script, it gives me an "E128: continuation line under-indented for visual indent" error on the second line.

I've tried a whole bunch of different ways of formatting, and the only way I can get PEP8 to stop complaining is:

    return render_to_response('foo/page.html', {
        'situations': situations,
        'active': active_req,
    },
        context_instance=RequestContext(request))

But this looks like garbage.

Suggestions? E124, E126, and E128 seem to be a huge pain!

I don't mind solutions which have the { on the first line (or on it's own), but I hope there's a solution where the }, and context_instance... are at the same indentation level.

  • Is there a reason you need this to all be one statement with one giant expression? Splitting it up won't make it any longer, and it means you don't even have any complicated style rules to worry about, and it'll probably be more readable and more debuggable to boot. – abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:02
21

The problem is that all parameters are supposed to be indented to the same level. That includes any parameter(s) on the initial function call line.

So, while you could fix it like this:

return render_to_response('foo/page.html',
                          {
                              'situations': situations,
                              'active': active_req,
                          },
                          context_instance=RequestContext(request))

… that'll usually just make you run afoul of the 80-column rule, and will certainly make your code uglier even if pep8 doesn't complain. What you probably want is this:

return render_to_response(
    'foo/page.html',
    {
        'situations': situations,
        'active': active_req,
    },
    context_instance=RequestContext(request))

Or, of course, you could just break up your giant expression:

d = {
    'situations': situations,
    'active': active_req,
}
context = RequestContext(request)
return render_to_response('foo/page.html', d, context_instance=context)
  • Thanks for your thorough answer and explanation. Makes complete sense. – Joseph Aug 28 '13 at 21:04
4

Have you ever tried with django-annoying ?

you can do this...

@render_to('foo/page.html')
def bar(request):
    return {'situations': situations,
            'active': active_req,}

I think this is cleaner and it can help you with the PEP8 style...

  • I haven't, but that looks awesome. Thanks for the tip! – Joseph Aug 28 '13 at 20:58
4

I'm pretty sure it wants you to indent everything to the opening parens (if you need a parameter up there) -- i.e.

return render_to_response('foo/page.html',
                          {
                              'situations': situations,
                              'active': active_req,
                          },
                          context_instance=RequestContext(request))

otherwise,

return render_to_response(
    'foo/page.html',
    {
        'situations': situations,
        'active': active_req,
    },
    context_instance=RequestContext(request))

should also be legal.

Or some such. See the pep docs on proper indentation practices

Here are the relevant examples from the specification, for a passing wanderer:

Yes:

# Aligned with opening delimiter
foo = long_function_name(var_one, var_two,
                         var_three, var_four)

# More indentation included to distinguish this from the rest.
def long_function_name(
        var_one, var_two, var_three,
        var_four):
    print(var_one)
No:

# Arguments on first line forbidden when not using vertical alignment
foo = long_function_name(var_one, var_two,
    var_three, var_four)

# Further indentation required as indentation is not distinguishable
def long_function_name(
    var_one, var_two, var_three,
    var_four):
    print(var_one)
Optional:

# Extra indentation is not necessary.
foo = long_function_name(
  var_one, var_two,
  var_three, var_four)
  • It doesn't want you to indent everything to the opening parens. If that were true, the second one wouldn't work. It just wants you to indent all params to the same level, as I explained in my answer. – abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:03
  • @abarnert I meant in his specific case -- his first parameter was at the "opening parens." If he wants to have an argument up there, it does need to be aligned with the start delimiter. as per pep 8: – vroomfondel Aug 28 '13 at 21:05
  • "Continuation lines should align wrapped elements either vertically using Python's implicit line joining inside parentheses, brackets and braces, or using a hanging indent. When using a hanging indent the following considerations should be applied; there should be no arguments on the first line and further indentation should be used to clearly distinguish itself as a continuation line." – vroomfondel Aug 28 '13 at 21:05
  • OK, with that extra clarification, it's fine. It was just a little confusing the way you had it originally. And the examples from the PEP are definitely helpful, especially since the second and last ones cover the OP's case exactly. – abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:27
  • @abarnert Yep, you're right, I fixed it because you made me realize that it was unclear. Thanks! – vroomfondel Aug 28 '13 at 21:30

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