20

I have concurrent goroutines which want to append a (pointer to a) struct to the same slice. How do you write that in Go to make it concurrency-safe?

This would be my concurrency-unsafe code, using a wait group:

var wg sync.WaitGroup
MySlice = make([]*MyStruct)
for _, param := range params {
    wg.Add(1)
    go func(param string) {
        defer wg.Done()
        OneOfMyStructs := getMyStruct(param)
        MySlice = append(MySlice, &OneOfMyStructs)
    }(param)
}
wg.Wait()

I guess you would need to use go channels for concurrency-safety. Can anyone contribute with an example?

21

There is nothing wrong with guarding the MySlice = append(MySlice, &OneOfMyStructs) with a sync.Mutex. But of course you can have a result channel with buffer size len(params) all goroutines send their answers and once your work is finished you collect from this result channel.

If your params has a fixed size:

MySlice = make([]*MyStruct, len(params))
for i, param := range params {
    wg.Add(1)
    go func(i int, param string) {
         defer wg.Done()
         OneOfMyStructs := getMyStruct(param)
         MySlice[i] = &OneOfMyStructs
     }(i, param)
}

As all goroutines write to different memory this isn't racy.

  • 3
    It's very interesting your last consideration: in case the size of the slice is known and you are just dealing with pointers to the objects, you don't need to use a concurrency mechanism at all – Daniele B Aug 28 '13 at 23:23
  • This does not depend on "slice of pointers": It would work also for "slice of MyStruct". Again the code never writes to the same memory. – Volker Aug 28 '13 at 23:35
  • I was assuming that the memory allocation for a pointer is fixed, while the memory allocation for a struct is not fixed. I suppose I am wrong then. – Daniele B Aug 29 '13 at 1:10
  • Hu? What is "fixed"? Any type in Go has a certain memory layout which is determined completely a compile time. No difference between a pointer and something else. – Volker Aug 29 '13 at 4:59
  • yes, I looked up and you are completely right – Daniele B Aug 29 '13 at 12:34
14

The answer posted by @jimt is not quite right, in that it misses the last value sent in the channel and the last defer wg.Done() is never called. The snippet below has the corrections.

https://play.golang.org/p/7N4sxD-Bai

package main

import "fmt"
import "sync"

type T int

func main() {
    var slice []T
    var wg sync.WaitGroup

    queue := make(chan T, 1)

    // Create our data and send it into the queue.
    wg.Add(100)
    for i := 0; i < 100; i++ {
        go func(i int) {
            // defer wg.Done()  <- will result in the last int to be missed in the receiving channel
            queue <- T(i)
        }(i)
    }

    go func() {
        // defer wg.Done() <- Never gets called since the 100 `Done()` calls are made above, resulting in the `Wait()` to continue on before this is executed
        for t := range queue {
            slice = append(slice, t)
            wg.Done()   // ** move the `Done()` call here
        }
    }()

    wg.Wait()

    // now prints off all 100 int values
    fmt.Println(slice)
}
0

A channel is the best way to tackle this. Here is an example which can be run on go playground.

package main

import "fmt"
import "sync"
import "runtime"

type T int

func main() {
    var slice []T
    var wg sync.WaitGroup

    queue := make(chan T, 1)

    // Create our data and send it into the queue.
    wg.Add(100)
    for i := 0; i < 100; i++ {
        go func(i int) {
            defer wg.Done()

            // Do stuff.
            runtime.Gosched()

            queue <- T(i)
        }(i)
    }

    // Poll the queue for data and append it to the slice.
    // Since this happens synchronously and in the same
    // goroutine/thread, this can be considered safe.
    go func() {
        defer wg.Done()
        for t := range queue {
            slice = append(slice, t)
        }
    }()

    // Wait for everything to finish.
    wg.Wait()

    fmt.Println(slice)
}

Note: The runtime.Gosched() call is there because those goroutines do not yield to the scheduler. Which would cause a deadlock if we do not explicitly do something to trigger said scheduler. Another option could have been to perform some I/O (e.g.: print to stdout). But I find a runtime.Gosched() to be easier and clearer in its intent.

  • Why does the channel receiving goroutine need to call defer wg.Done()? – Qian Chen Apr 18 '15 at 15:32
  • 1
    It doesn't have to be deferred. Just a wg.Done() call at the end of that goroutine will work in this case. Defer is mostly useful to ensure proper behaviour when you have multiple exits/returns. – jimt Apr 19 '15 at 1:59
  • 7
    Actually my question was why wg.Done() needs to be called in the second go routine? The first loop will clear the counter of 100. – Qian Chen Apr 19 '15 at 6:24
  • 1
    There is a bug in the original code.You actually want wg.Add(101). You need to include it in the wait group, or else you risk the chance that all of the other goroutines have finished, but you haven't finished appending before you print the values. – brendan Nov 23 '15 at 18:24
  • There are bugs in this code. @ElgsQianChen wg.Done() is not called in the second go routine. @brendan since the last wg.Done() is never called setting the count to 101 will result in a deadlock. – chris Aug 21 '16 at 14:38

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