9

Initial code:

Lets assume we're using this command to create the dummy data:

Data <- data.frame(
    X = paste(c(sample(1:10),sample(1:10)), collapse=";"),
    Y = sample(c("yes", "no"), 10, replace = TRUE)
)

Output:

                                           X   Y
1  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes
2  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7  no
3  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7  no
4  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes
5  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7  no
6  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes
7  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7  no
8  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes
9  10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes
10 10;7;4;3;8;6;5;2;9;1;3;5;10;2;9;6;8;4;1;7 yes

Question:

Using xlsx package I can output the X column data to an excel file colored.

Is there a way where I can color lets say the values bigger then 5 to red and lesser then 5 to blue and put in the same cell everything. Basically I just write this table to an excel but some values are colored.

Thank you in advance,

5
  • 1
    I want to generate a file in R not conditionally format it afterwards. – alap Aug 29 '13 at 13:25
  • Why not create an Excel workbook "template" and use xlsx or XLConnect packages to write data directly to the cells? – Carl Witthoft Aug 29 '13 at 15:23
  • Can u specify what you mean by a "template". Right now I have an excel file with 10 columns, 2 columns are free. In one of the columns I output column "X" as I specified before. Outputting to the new column I would need to color every cell of this column. The problem I'm facing that in one Cell there are more numbers. I need to color some number and others not. How can I achieve this? – alap Sep 4 '13 at 8:48
  • 1
    There can only be one number in one cell. So if you're trying to write multiple values to a single cell, you'll have to turn them into a character string. I hope you're not doing that, as it's insanely bad to do something like that. Now, if you are properly writing a single value to each cell, first open the Excel workbook and set the conditional formatting for the column "X" is going into to whatever color vs value conditions you want. Then when you write from R into the workbook, the coloring will happen. – Carl Witthoft Sep 4 '13 at 11:32
  • Looking back at you're comment carefully again I think the answer lies in Conditional formatting. Please post it as an answer! I wanted to do everything from R, but it's doable from Excel only. – alap Sep 4 '13 at 11:42
0

I doubt it's possible to change Excel's conditional formatting directly from R. So, first open the Excel workbook and set the conditional formatting for the column "X" is going into to whatever color vs value conditions you want. Then when you write from R into the workbook, the coloring will happen.

0
18

I am essentially copying code from this question and my answer there and making some adjustments for this use case. I'm not sure about the etiquette on this, but I just wanted to show that this can be done! Anyone, let me know if I have done something I shouldn't do in reusing the code in the linked question for this answer. If this is seen as a duplicate now that the other question is answered, I'm fine with that. Just trying to help!

First, reformat the data a little.

# split the X column so there will be one numeric entry per cell 
d <- matrix(as.numeric(unlist(strsplit(as.character(Data$X), ";"))), 
           ncol = 20, byrow = TRUE)

d <- data.frame(d, Data$Y)
cols <- length(d[1, ]) # number of columns, we'll use this later

Second, we can use functions in xlsx to create a workbook, and then get at the cell values.

library(xlsx)

# exporting data.frame to excel is easy with xlsx package
sheetname <- "mysheet"
write.xlsx(d, "mydata.xlsx", sheetName=sheetname)
file <- "mydata.xlsx"
# but we want to highlight cells if value greater than or equal to 5
wb <- loadWorkbook(file)              # load workbook
fo1 <- Fill(foregroundColor="blue")   # create fill object # 1
cs1 <- CellStyle(wb, fill=fo1)        # create cell style # 1
fo2 <- Fill(foregroundColor="red")    # create fill object # 2
cs2 <- CellStyle(wb, fill=fo2)        # create cell style # 2 
sheets <- getSheets(wb)               # get all sheets
sheet <- sheets[[sheetname]]          # get specific sheet
rows <- getRows(sheet, rowIndex=2:(nrow(d)+1))     # get rows
                                                   # 1st row is headers
cells <- getCells(rows, colIndex = 2:cols)         # get cells

# in the wb I import with loadWorkbook, numeric data starts in column 2
# The first column is row numbers.  The last column is "yes" and "no" entries, so
# we do not include them, thus we use colIndex = 2:cols

values <- lapply(cells, getCellValue) # extract the cell values

Next we find the cells that need to be formatted according to the criteria.

# find cells meeting conditional criteria > 5
highlightblue <- NULL
for (i in names(values)) {
  x <- as.numeric(values[i])
  if (x > 5 && !is.na(x)) {
    highlightblue <- c(highlightblue, i)
  }    
}

# find cells meeting conditional criteria < 5
highlightred <- NULL
for (i in names(values)) {
  x <- as.numeric(values[i])
  if (x < 5 && !is.na(x)) {
    highlightred <- c(highlightred, i)
  }    
}

Finally, apply the formatting and save the workbook.

lapply(names(cells[highlightblue]),
       function(ii) setCellStyle(cells[[ii]], cs1))

lapply(names(cells[highlightred]),
       function(ii) setCellStyle(cells[[ii]], cs2))

saveWorkbook(wb, file)
4
  • 1
    It appears you have applied coloring and highlighting, but that is not Conditional Formatting, which in Excel is a dynamic setting which will change automatically if the cell value changes. – Carl Witthoft Feb 11 '14 at 2:11
  • 1
    I was not interested about conditional formating, I wanted to color some stuff only. But thanks for the answers everyone! – alap Feb 11 '14 at 10:11
  • I achieved my filling with your script. works perfectly. Thanks – Shicheng Guo Jul 2 '20 at 19:51
  • works perfectly, however on big datasets it takes quite a while so keep that in mind. Thanks! – Olympia Mar 11 at 12:01

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