150

I looked around for how to use the Object.defineProperty method, but couldn't find anything decent.

Someone gave me this snippet of code:

Object.defineProperty(player, "health", {
    get: function () {
        return 10 + ( player.level * 15 );
    }
})

But I don't understand it. Mainly, the get is what I can't get (pun intended). How does it work?

443
+100

Since you asked a similar question, let's take it step by step. It's a bit longer, but it may save you much more time than I have spent on writing this:

Property is an OOP feature designed for clean separation of client code. For example, in some e-shop you might have objects like this:

function Product(name,price) {
  this.name = name;
  this.price = price;
  this.discount = 0;
}

var sneakers = new Product("Sneakers",20); // {name:"Sneakers",price:20,discount:0}
var tshirt = new Product("T-shirt",10);  // {name:"T-shirt",price:10,discount:0}

Then in your client code (the e-shop), you can add discounts to your products:

function badProduct(obj) { obj.discount+= 20; ... }
function generalDiscount(obj) { obj.discount+= 10; ... }
function distributorDiscount(obj) { obj.discount+= 15; ... }

Later, the e-shop owner might realize that the discount can't be greater than say 80%. Now you need to find EVERY occurence of the discount modification in the client code and add a line

if(obj.discount>80) obj.discount = 80;

Then the e-shop owner may further change his strategy, like "if the customer is reseller, the maximal discount can be 90%". And you need to do the change on multiple places again plus you need to remember to alter these lines anytime the strategy is changed. This is a bad design. That's why encapsulation is the basic principle of OOP. If the constructor was like this:

function Product(name,price) {
  var _name=name, _price=price, _discount=0;
  this.getName = function() { return _name; }
  this.setName = function(value) { _name = value; }
  this.getPrice = function() { return _price; }
  this.setPrice = function(value) { _price = value; }
  this.getDiscount = function() { return _discount; }
  this.setDiscount = function(value) { _discount = value; } 
}

Then you can just alter the getDiscount (accessor) and setDiscount (mutator) methods. The problem is that most of the members behave like common variables, just the discount needs special care here. But good design requires encapsulation of every data member to keep the code extensible. So you need to add lots of code that does nothing. This is also a bad design, a boilerplate antipattern. Sometimes you can't just refactor the fields to methods later (the eshop code may grow large or some third-party code may depend on the old version), so the boilerplate is lesser evil here. But still, it is evil. That's why properties were introduced into many languages. You could keep the original code, just transform the discount member into a property with get and set blocks:

function Product(name,price) {
  this.name = name;
  this.price = price;
//this.discount = 0; // <- remove this line and refactor with the code below
  var _discount; // private member
  Object.defineProperty(this,"discount",{
    get: function() { return _discount; },
    set: function(value) { _discount = value; if(_discount>80) _discount = 80; }
  });
}

// the client code
var sneakers = new Product("Sneakers",20);
sneakers.discount = 50; // 50, setter is called
sneakers.discount+= 20; // 70, setter is called
sneakers.discount+= 20; // 80, not 90!
alert(sneakers.discount); // getter is called

Note the last but one line: the responsibility for correct discount value was moved from the client code (e-shop definition) to the product definition. The product is responsible for keeping its data members consistent. Good design is (roughly said) if the code works the same way as our thoughts.

So much about properties. But javascript is different from pure Object-oriented languages like C# and codes the features differently:

In C#, transforming fields into properties is a breaking change, so public fields should be coded as Auto-Implemented Properties if your code might be used in separatedly compiled client.

In Javascript, the standard properties (data member with getter and setter described above) are defined by accessor descriptor (in the link you have in your question). Exclusively, you can use data descriptor (so you can't use i.e. value and set on the same property):

  • accessor descriptor = get + set (see the example above)
    • get must be a function; its return value is used in reading the property; if not specified, the default is undefined, which behaves like a function that returns undefined
    • set must be a function; its parameter is filled with RHS in assigning a value to property; if not specified, the default is undefined, which behaves like an empty function
  • data descriptor = value + writable (see the example below)
    • value default undefined; if writable, configurable and enumerable (see below) are true, the property behaves like an ordinary data field
    • writable - default false; if not true, the property is read only; attempt to write is ignored without error*!

Both descriptors can have these members:

  • configurable - default false; if not true, the property can't be deleted; attempt to delete is ignored without error*!
  • enumerable - default false; if true, it will be iterated in for(var i in theObject); if false, it will not be iterated, but it is still accessible as public

* unless in strict mode - in that case JS stops execution with TypeError unless it is caught in try-catch block

To read these settings, use Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor().

Learn by example:

var o = {};
Object.defineProperty(o,"test",{
  value: "a",
  configurable: true
});
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(o,"test")); // check the settings    

for(var i in o) console.log(o[i]); // nothing, o.test is not enumerable
console.log(o.test); // "a"
o.test = "b"; // o.test is still "a", (is not writable, no error)
delete(o.test); // bye bye, o.test (was configurable)
o.test = "b"; // o.test is "b"
for(var i in o) console.log(o[i]); // "b", default fields are enumerable

If you don't wish to allow the client code such cheats, you can restrict the object by three levels of confinement:

  • Object.preventExtensions(yourObject) prevents new properties to be added to yourObject. Use Object.isExtensible(<yourObject>) to check if the method was used on the object. The prevention is shallow (read below).
  • Object.seal(yourObject) same as above and properties can not be removed (effectively sets configurable: false to all properties). Use Object.isSealed(<yourObject>) to detect this feature on the object. The seal is shallow (read below).
  • Object.freeze(yourObject) same as above and properties can not be changed (effectively sets writable: false to all properties with data descriptor). Setter's writable property is not affected (since it doesn't have one). The freeze is shallow: it means that if the property is Object, its properties ARE NOT frozen (if you wish to, you should perform something like "deep freeze", similar to deep copy - cloning). Use Object.isFrozen(<yourObject>) to detect it.

You don't need to bother with this if you write just a few lines fun. But if you want to code a game (as you mentioned in the linked question), you should really care about good design. Try to google something about antipatterns and code smell. It will help you to avoid situations like "Oh, I need to completely rewrite my code again!", it can save you months of despair if you want to code a lot. Good luck.

  • This portion is clear. function Product(name,price) { this.name = name; this.price = price; var _discount; // private member Object.defineProperty(this,"discount",{ get: function() { return _discount; }, set: function(value) { _discount = value; if(_discount>80) _discount = 80; } }); } var sneakers = new Product("Sneakers",20); sneakers.discount = 50; // 50, setter is called sneakers.discount+= 20; // 70, setter is called sneakers.discount+= 20; // 80, not 90! alert(sneakers.discount); // getter is called – abu abu Apr 19 '18 at 14:22
22

get is a function that is called when you try to read the value player.health, like in:

console.log(player.health);

It's effectively not much different than:

player.getHealth = function(){
  return 10 + this.level*15;
}
console.log(player.getHealth());

The opposite of get is set, which would be used when you assign to the value. Since there is no setter, it seems that assigning to the player's health is not intended:

player.health = 5; // Doesn't do anything, since there is no set function defined

A very simple example:

var player = {
  level: 5
};

Object.defineProperty(player, "health", {
  get: function() {
    return 10 + (player.level * 15);
  }
});

console.log(player.health); // 85
player.level++;
console.log(player.health); // 100

player.health = 5; // Does nothing
console.log(player.health); // 100

  • it's just like a function that you don't need to actually use () to call... I don't understand what was the idea when they invented this thing. Functions are totally the same: jsbin.com/bugipi/edit?js,console,output – vsync Aug 6 '15 at 15:36
9

defineProperty is a method on Object which allow you to configure the properties to meet some criterias. Here is a simple example with an employee object with two properties firstName & lastName and append the two properties by overriding the toString method on the object.

var employee = {
    firstName: "Jameel",
    lastName: "Moideen"
};
employee.toString=function () {
    return this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
};
console.log(employee.toString());

You will get Output as : Jameel Moideen

I am going to change the same code by using defineProperty on the object

var employee = {
    firstName: "Jameel",
    lastName: "Moideen"
};
Object.defineProperty(employee, 'toString', {
    value: function () {
        return this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
    },
    writable: true,
    enumerable: true,
    configurable: true
});
console.log(employee.toString());

The first parameter is the name of the object and then second parameter is name of the property we are adding , in our case it’s toString and then the last parameter is json object which have a value going to be a function and three parameters writable,enumerable and configurable.Right now I just declared everything as true.

If u run the example you will get Output as : Jameel Moideen

Let’s understand why we need the three properties such as writable,enumerable and configurable. writable One of the very annoying part of the javascript is , if you change the toString property to something else for example enter image description here

if run this again , everything gets breaks Let’s change writable to false. If run the same again you will get the correct output as ‘Jameel Moideen’ . This property will prevent overwrite this property later. enumerable if you print all the keys inside the object , you can see all the properties including toString.

console.log(Object.keys(employee));

enter image description here

if you set enumerable to false , you can hide toString property from everybody else. If run this again you will get firstName,lastName configurable

if someone later redefined the object on later for example enumerable to true and run it. You can see toString property came again.

var employee = {
    firstName: "Jameel",
    lastName: "Moideen"
};
Object.defineProperty(employee, 'toString', {
    value: function () {
        return this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
    },
    writable: false,
    enumerable: false,
    configurable: true
});

//change enumerable to false
Object.defineProperty(employee, 'toString', {

    enumerable: true
});
employee.toString="changed";
console.log(Object.keys(employee));

enter image description here

you can restrict this behavior by set configurable to false.

Orginal reference of this information is from my personal Blog

  • 1
    I get that you had this on your blog and just pasted it here, but at least know this for the future: screencaps are not popular on SO. You can't copypaste code to try it and the code won't be seen by search engines or assistive technology. – Jacque Goupil Sep 18 '17 at 3:26
  • @JacqueGoupil You are right.i will update by add code instead of screen shot – Code-EZ Sep 18 '17 at 3:30
2

Basically, defineProperty is a method that takes in 3 parameters - an object, a property, and a descriptor. What is happening in this particular call is the "health" property of the player object is getting assigned to 10 plus 15 times that player object's level.

0

yes no more function extending for setup setter & getter this is my example Object.defineProperty(obj,name,func)

var obj = {};
['data', 'name'].forEach(function(name) {
    Object.defineProperty(obj, name, {
        get : function() {
            return 'setter & getter';
        }
    });
});


console.log(obj.data);
console.log(obj.name);
0

Object.defineProperty() is a global function..Its not available inside the function which declares the object otherwise.You'll have to use it statically...

0

Summary:

Object.defineProperty(player, "health", {
    get: function () {
        return 10 + ( player.level * 15 );
    }
});

Object.defineProperty is used in order to make a new property on the player object. Object.defineProperty is a function which is natively present in the JS runtime environemnt and takes the following arguments:

Object.defineProperty(obj, prop, descriptor)

  1. The object on which we want to define a new property
  2. The name of the new property we want to define
  3. descriptor object

The descriptor object is the interesting part. In here we can define the following things:

  1. configurable <boolean>: If true the property descriptor may be changed and the property may be deleted from the object. If configurable is false the descriptor properties which are passed in Object.defineProperty cannot be changed.
  2. Writable <boolean>: If true the property may be overwritten using the assignment operator.
  3. Enumerable <boolean>: If true the property can be iterated over in a for...in loop. Also when using the Object.keys function the key will be present. If the property is false they will not be iterated over using a for..in loop and not show up when using Object.keys.
  4. get <function> : A function which is called whenever is the property is required. Instead of giving the direct value this function is called and the returned value is given as the value of the property
  5. set <function> : A function which is called whenever is the property is assigned. Instead of setting the direct value this function is called and the returned value is used to set the value of the property.

Example:

const player = {
  level: 10
};

Object.defineProperty(player, "health", {
  configurable: true,
  enumerable: false,
  get: function() {
    console.log('Inside the get function');
    return 10 + (player.level * 15);
  }
});

console.log(player.health);
// the get function is called and the return value is returned as a value

for (let prop in player) {
  console.log(prop);
  // only prop is logged here, health is not logged because is not an iterable property.
  // This is because we set the enumerable to false when defining the property
}

0

import { CSSProperties } from 'react'
import { BLACK, BLUE, GREY_DARK, WHITE } from '../colours'

export const COLOR_ACCENT = BLUE
export const COLOR_DEFAULT = BLACK
export const FAMILY = "'Segoe UI', sans-serif"
export const SIZE_LARGE = '26px'
export const SIZE_MEDIUM = '20px'
export const WEIGHT = 400

type Font = {
  color: string,
  size: string,
  accent: Font,
  default: Font,
  light: Font,
  neutral: Font,
  xsmall: Font,
  small: Font,
  medium: Font,
  large: Font,
  xlarge: Font,
  xxlarge: Font
} & (() => CSSProperties)

function font (this: Font): CSSProperties {
  const css = {
    color: this.color,
    fontFamily: FAMILY,
    fontSize: this.size,
    fontWeight: WEIGHT
  }
  delete this.color
  delete this.size
  return css
}

const dp = (type: 'color' | 'size', name: string, value: string) => {
  Object.defineProperty(font, name, { get () {
    this[type] = value
    return this
  }})
}

dp('color', 'accent', COLOR_ACCENT)
dp('color', 'default', COLOR_DEFAULT)
dp('color', 'light', COLOR_LIGHT)
dp('color', 'neutral', COLOR_NEUTRAL)
dp('size', 'xsmall', SIZE_XSMALL)
dp('size', 'small', SIZE_SMALL)
dp('size', 'medium', SIZE_MEDIUM)

export default font as Font

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