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Sorry to ask this question and it may be a duplicate of other similar threads in Stack overflow.Those similar thready does not work in my situation.

I am having a quite enough knowledge in spring 3.2 and completed one small project in spring.

Now I am new to JSF and I some created basic JSF example .I would like to use the JSF features and its components for my new Spring + JSF project.

The links that I came out for JSF + Spring Integration are given below ,

http://papweb.wordpress.com/2011/07/29/spring-mvc-3-jsf-2-with-maven-2-and-tomcat/

http://blog.terrencemiao.com/archives/spring-3-shacks-up-jsf-2-the-maverick-way

The resources I found , does not helped me and that was very old post.

Can any one provide me a sample Integration for JSF 2.X + Spring 3.x MVC with controller and view resolver and this would help a lot of users who really seeking for a working one..

Hope our stack users will help me.

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+50

First of all: you shouldn't use JSF and Spring MVC together since they compete against each other! (That's my opinion!)

Take a look at these links:

  • Thanks for a quick reply . May I know why should I don't use it together ? – Human Being Sep 2 '13 at 9:23
  • they compete against each other in some points – Philipp Sander Sep 2 '13 at 9:29
  • Is it possible to integrate both or not ? any other alternatives ? – Human Being Sep 2 '13 at 9:31
  • sure it is possible. as show in the tutorial – Philipp Sander Sep 2 '13 at 9:33
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    But , In that example they don't use spring controller.Because in my application where I need to write my business logic ? I already done the business logic in my spring controller. – Human Being Sep 2 '13 at 9:35
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In my opinion, Spring and JSF - both could be used just fine. It, of course, mostly depends on your requirements and preferences of using those frameworks.

Spring - it has very nice ways of transactions management, dependency injection, security and many other features, however - plain JSF does not provide this kind of features out of the box, but JSF has very nice way of rendering views. So these features from both frameworks mixed up together could result in simplicity. JSF has a variety of it's frameworks which are built on it, like:

In my opinion, you could simplify your views development, if you had been using JSF. JSF has ManagedBean(s), which depending on your configuration serves your requests, like Spring controllers does.

Actual configuration is pretty straight forward. You need to have:

faces-config.xml file which contains SpringBeanFacesELResolver:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<faces-config xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
              xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
              xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-facesconfig_2_0.xsd"
              version="2.0">

    <application>
        <el-resolver>org.springframework.web.jsf.el.SpringBeanFacesELResolver</el-resolver>
    </application>

    <navigation-rule>
        <!-- your rules here -->
    </navigation-rule>

</faces-config>

Spring applicationCotext.xml file. Usual spring config, nothing JSF specific.

Your web.xml which should look something like this:

<web-app xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_3_0.xsd"
         version="3.0">

    <!-- other config -->

    <context-param>
        <param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name>
        <param-value>WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml</param-value>
    </context-param>

    <context-param>
        <param-name>javax.faces.PROJECT_STAGE</param-name>
        <param-value>Production</param-value>
    </context-param>

    <listener>
        <listener-class>org.springframework.web.context.ContextLoaderListener</listener-class>
    </listener>
    <listener>
        <listener-class>org.springframework.web.context.request.RequestContextListener</listener-class>
    </listener>

    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>Faces Servlet</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>javax.faces.webapp.FacesServlet</servlet-class>
        <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
    </servlet>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>Faces Servlet</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>*.xhtml</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>

    <!-- other of config -->

</web-app>

The most pretty cool thing in JSF is View Scope, which would be lost by default, if you had been using JSF with Spring, but definitely you don't want to lose it. This explains how to make View Scope work in JSF and Spring integration.

If I would be building some application from scratch, I would choose these two frameworks and integrate them together, but this is just my opinion. Hope this clears some things for you.

  • Thanks for the reply.But how can I get the value in the JSF view page that I already put model.addAttribute("some", someObject); in the spring controller. – Human Being Sep 5 '13 at 6:43
  • You don't have to use spring model anymore, you have to use JSF ManagedBeans. Ditch spring MVC stuff from your application, use JSF for controller layer and spring for transaction management, dependency injection, etc. – Paulius Matulionis Sep 5 '13 at 7:29

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