11

I have a set of large dataframes that look like A and B:

A <- data.frame(A1=c(1,2,3,4,5),B1=c(6,7,8,9,10),C1=c(11,12,13,14,15 ))

  A1 B1 C1
1  1  6 11
2  2  7 12
3  3  8 13
4  4  9 14
5  5 10 15

B <- data.frame(A2=c(6,7,7,10,11),B2=c(2,1,3,8,11),C2=c(1,5,16,7,8))

  A2 B2 C2
1  6  2  1
2  7  1  5
3  7  3 16
4 10  8  7
5 11 11  8

I would like to create a vector (C) that denotes the Pearson correlation between A1 & A2, B1 & B2, and C1 & C2. In this case, for example, those correlations are:

[1] 0.95 0.92 0.46
13

cor accepts two data.frames:

A<-data.frame(A1=c(1,2,3,4,5),B1=c(6,7,8,9,10),C1=c(11,12,13,14,15 ))

B<-data.frame(A2=c(6,7,7,10,11),B2=c(2,1,3,8,11),C2=c(1,5,16,7,8))

cor(A,B)

#           A2        B2       C2
# A1 0.9481224 0.9190183 0.459588
# B1 0.9481224 0.9190183 0.459588
# C1 0.9481224 0.9190183 0.459588

diag(cor(A,B))
#[1] 0.9481224 0.9190183 0.4595880

Edit:

Here are some benchmarks:

Unit: microseconds
                   expr     min       lq   median       uq      max neval
        diag(cor(A, B)) 230.292 238.4225 243.0115 255.0295  352.955   100
      mapply(cor, A, B) 267.076 281.5120 286.8030 299.5260  375.087   100
 unlist(Map(cor, A, B)) 250.053 259.1045 264.5635 275.9035 1146.140   100

Edit2:

And some better benchmarks using

set.seed(42)
A <- as.data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10*n),ncol=n))
B <- as.data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10*n),ncol=n))

enter image description here

However, I should probably mention that these benchmarks strongly depend on the number of rows.

Edit3: Since I was asked for the benchmarking code, here it is.

b <- sapply(2^(1:12), function(n) {
    set.seed(42)
    A <- as.data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10*n),ncol=n))
    B <- as.data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10*n),ncol=n))

    require(microbenchmark)
    res <- print(microbenchmark(
                   diag(cor(A,B)),
                   mapply(cor, A, B),
                   unlist(Map(cor,A,B)),
                   times=10
                 ),unit="us")
    res$median
})

b <- t(b)

matplot(x=1:12,log10(b),type="l",
        ylab="log10(median [µs])", 
        xlab="log2(n)",col=1:3,lty=1)
legend("topleft", legend=c("diag(cor(A, B))", 
                           "mapply(cor, A, B)",
                           "unlist(Map(cor,A,B))"),lty=1, col=1:3)
  • 4
    + diag to get only the values he is interested in. – sgibb Aug 30 '13 at 14:27
  • Thanks, I was just preparing the edit. – Roland Aug 30 '13 at 14:27
  • Is there a function analogous to cor that gives the p-values of the correlation? – dayne Aug 30 '13 at 16:51
  • cor.test, but it only accepts vectors as input. – Roland Aug 30 '13 at 16:52
  • 1
    @sds Mmh? diag is extremely fast and doesn't matter much here. If cor is passed data.frames, these get coerced to matrices. The matrices are then passed to a C function. And compiled code is much more efficient than mapply or Map. – Roland Aug 30 '13 at 19:31
7

You can use friend of apply functions, Map, for that.

Map(function(x,y) cor(x,y),A,B)
$A1
[1] 0.9481224

$B1
[1] 0.9190183

$C1
[1] 0.459588

If you want the output as vector as suggested by @Jilber :

unlist(Map(function(x,y) cor(x,y),A,B))
       A1        B1        C1 
0.9481224 0.9190183 0.4595880

Or you can just use:

 unlist(Map(cor,A,B))
       A1        B1        C1 
0.9481224 0.9190183 0.459588
  • 1
    Since the OP wants a vector, you should use unlist(·). – Jilber Urbina Aug 30 '13 at 14:39
  • Thanks. I will update that. – Metrics Aug 30 '13 at 14:41
  • +1 for a good example of Map, I still haven't quite wrapped my head around these functional programming concepts in R. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 13 '14 at 16:51
6

Another alternative you can use mapply function

> mapply(function(x,y) cor(x,y),A,B)
       A1        B1        C1 
0.9481224 0.9190183 0.4595880 

Or just mapply(cor, A, B) as suggested by @Aaron.

  • 3
    This is what I'd do, though mapply(cor, A, B) is sufficient. – Aaron Aug 30 '13 at 14:39
  • @Aaron how could one apply this thinking to a list of files needing correlations between them? Say A....Z? – KennyC Apr 2 '15 at 19:27
  • @KennyC: Better I think to start a new question; more detail would be needed. – Aaron Apr 4 '15 at 4:29

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