I could not find a natural way to do something like that in scala :

class Car {
  var speed: Int
  var color: String
}

var myCar = new Car()

myCar.set {
  speed = 5
  color = "green"
}

I know it is possible in other languages as Groovy. I also know I can do it with a constructor like this :

val myCar = new Car { 
  speed = 5
  color = "green"
}

I am interested in a way to do the same, not at the object construction but later, once the object has already been created

This is what I have been doing so far :

class Car (var speed: Int, var color: String) {

  def set(f: (Car) => Unit) = {
    f(this)
  }

}

val myCar = new Car(5, "red")
myCar.set { c =>
  c.speed = 12
  c.color = "green"
}

But I do not like the need to write the 'c' var for every attribute

Any idea on how I can do it or if there is an easier way ??

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should avoid mutable classes unless absolutely necessary. You would do normally this in Scala:

case class Car(speed: Int, color: String)

val c1 = Car(5, "red")
val c2 = c1.copy(speed = 12, color = "green")

(Then c2 is a new version of the car, while c1 remains unchanged.)


If you want to stick with your mutable type, why not just

class Car(var speed: Int, var color: String)

val myCar = new Car(5, "red")
import myCar._
speed = 12
color = "green"

Going with a dedicated set method:

class Car(var speed: Int, var color: String) {
  def set(speed: Int = this.speed, color: String = this.color): Unit = {
    this.speed = speed
    this.color = color
  }
}

val myCar = new Car(5, "red")
myCar.set(speed = 12, color = "green")
myCar.set(color = "blue")
  • In my context I have a pool of objects that I reuse. I do not create new objects since it is to slow to achieve that's why I have a mutable class. I find the second version not really easy to read even though it is basically what I want to do – itsu Aug 30 '13 at 14:52
  • Then see my third version – 0__ Aug 30 '13 at 15:01
  • Ok, sorry I did not explain really explain my entire thought... With the third version, you always need to update the function when updating the class attributes. Plus you cannot call any methods either. What I really wanted to do was both myCar.set { speed = 12 color = "green" move() stop() } that is why I need something more generic – itsu Aug 30 '13 at 15:08
  • You can still use the set method as you defined it, and write import c._ at the top of the function argument's body. – 0__ Aug 30 '13 at 16:06
  • 1
    Why does it even make sense to call move() or stop() in the set block? You seem to want something like VB's with construct. An ugly hack (but so is the construct) is def withThis(m: (this.type => Unit)*): Unit = m.foreach(_(this)). Then you'd do myCar.withThis(_.speed = 12, _.color = "green", _.move(), _.stop(), _.speed = 5, _.move()). But now after proposing that, I must go shower. – Mysterious Dan Aug 30 '13 at 17:03

Although we all agree to say var reassignement is ugly, this is a possible solution

object DoTo { 
  def apply[T](that: T)(functions: (T) => Unit*): T = {
    functions foreach { _.apply(that) }
    that
  }    
}


class Car (var speed: Int, var color: String) {
  def move() = println("moving")
  def stop() = println("stop")
}


val myNewCar = DoTo(new Car(12, "red")) (
  _.move(),
  _.stop(),
  _.speed = 15,
  _.color = "green"
)

This is not exactly what I wanted initially but I cannot find anything simpler whithout using macros :-(

You can do it by importing a variable:

class Car {
  var speed: Int = _
  var color: String = _
}

// ...
val myCar = new Car();
// a blocks that works with myCar:
{
    import myCar._
    // access the content without any prefix
    speed = 5
    color = "green"
}

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