234

In nodejs I use __dirname . What is the equivalent of this in Golang?

I have googled and found out this article http://andrewbrookins.com/tech/golang-get-directory-of-the-current-file/ . Where he uses below code

_, filename, _, _ := runtime.Caller(1)
f, err := os.Open(path.Join(path.Dir(filename), "data.csv"))

But is it the right way or idiomatic way to do in Golang?

  • this is not an answer for your question but you may cache the path to a global var (your file location can not be changed while running :) ) not to run os.open again and again each time your code runs – oguzalb Aug 30 '13 at 16:14
  • You should pass 0, not 1, to runtime.Caller(). – fiatjaf Feb 24 '17 at 14:43
  • 2
    runtime.Caller(0) will give you the path of the source file, like $GOPATH/src/packagename/main.go. The other answers in this thread are trying to return the path of the executable (like $GOPATH/bin/packagename). – fiatjaf Feb 24 '17 at 14:50
  • You're assuming the program is running from a file... – Flimzy Jul 19 '17 at 23:12
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Go: find the path to the executable – Jocelyn Jul 24 '17 at 9:37
219

This should do it:

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    dir, err := filepath.Abs(filepath.Dir(os.Args[0]))
    if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(dir)
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Is it possible for there to be an error here? If so, what would the error be, just out of curiosity? – Jeff Escalante Jun 30 '14 at 15:59
  • 4
    Doesn't work for me play.golang.org/p/c8fe-Zm_bH - os.Args[0] does not necessarily contain the abs path. – zupa Feb 13 '15 at 11:43
  • 5
    It actually works even if os.Args[0] does not contain the abs path. The reason the playground result is not what you expected is because it is inside a sandbox. – Gustavo Niemeyer Jul 21 '15 at 13:51
  • 36
    This is not a reliable way, see the answer about using osext as this was implementation that worked with all of our clients on various OSs. I had implemented code using this method but it seems to not be very reliable and many users complained of bugs that caused by this method choosing the wrong path for the executable. – JD D Jan 12 '16 at 15:38
  • 5
    Got the same result as emrah using Go 1.6 on Windows (got path of temp folder instead of source file folder). To get the path of your source file's folder without using any external dependency, use a slighly modified version of the OP's code: _, currentFilePath, _, _ := runtime.Caller(0) dirpath := path.Dir(currentFilePath) (note the runtime.Caller(0) instead of runtime.Caller(1)) – TanguyP Mar 13 '16 at 13:41
284

EDIT: As of Go 1.8 (Released February 2017) the recommended way of doing this is with os.Executable:

func Executable() (string, error)

Executable returns the path name for the executable that started the current process. There is no guarantee that the path is still pointing to the correct executable. If a symlink was used to start the process, depending on the operating system, the result might be the symlink or the path it pointed to. If a stable result is needed, path/filepath.EvalSymlinks might help.

To get just the directory of the executable you can use path/filepath.Dir.

Example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    ex, err := os.Executable()
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    exPath := filepath.Dir(ex)
    fmt.Println(exPath)
}

OLD ANSWER:

You should be able to use os.Getwd

func Getwd() (pwd string, err error)

Getwd returns a rooted path name corresponding to the current directory. If the current directory can be reached via multiple paths (due to symbolic links), Getwd may return any one of them.

For example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    pwd, err := os.Getwd()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    fmt.Println(pwd)
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 3
    This is current process working directory. In nodejs it is equivalent to process.cwd() nodejs.org/api/process.html#process_process_cwd – ekanna Aug 30 '13 at 16:31
  • 2
    Ok, I see the distinction. Of you're after the location of the binary in the filesytem (rather than the current working directory) I think that runtime.Caller is the closest you'll get to "idiomatic" – Intermernet Aug 30 '13 at 16:35
  • 3
    'Released February 2017'? It seems time machine has been invented and we have members posting from the future. It is nice to know a future version will have reliable cross platform method, In the meantime we have to stick to currently available solutions. – ljgww Jan 13 '17 at 8:14
  • 1
    @ljgww Sorry, I'll take my Delorean and go home :-) I updated my answer in advance because I'd only just seen that upcoming feature and figured I'd forget to update the answer later on. – Intermernet Jan 15 '17 at 12:53
  • 1
    Edited with path/filepath.Dir because path.Dir only works with forward slashes (Unix style) as directory separators. – Jocelyn Jul 24 '17 at 8:11
63

Use package osext

It's providing function ExecutableFolder() that returns an absolute path to folder where the currently running program executable reside (useful for cron jobs). It's cross platform.

Online documentation

package main

import (
    "github.com/kardianos/osext"
    "fmt"
    "log"
)

func main() {
    folderPath, err := osext.ExecutableFolder()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(folderPath)
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 13
    This is the only answer that produced the expected results for me both on Windows and on Linux. – DannyB Oct 21 '14 at 20:37
  • 3
    This works fine until you'd like to use it with go run main.go for local development. Not sure how best to get around that without building an executable beforehand each time. – Derek Dowling Jan 14 '16 at 1:37
  • 1
    Sorry I don't know how to make it work with go run. This binaries are put in temporary folder each time. – Dobrosław Żybort Jan 18 '16 at 12:15
  • 2
    @DerekDowling a way would be first doing a go install, then running go build -v *.go && ./main. The -v would tell you which files are being built. Generally, I've found that the time different between go run and go build is tolerable if I've already run go install. For windows users on powershell, the command will be go build -v {*}.go && ./main.exe – kumarharsh Sep 6 '16 at 11:58
  • Since this will return $GOPATH/bin/, why not use $GOPATH/bin/? – fiatjaf Feb 24 '17 at 14:49
10
filepath.Abs("./")

Abs returns an absolute representation of path. If the path is not absolute it will be joined with the current working directory to turn it into an absolute path.

As stated in the comment, this returns the directory which is currently active.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 7
    This returns the current directory, not the directory of the current file. For instance, this would be different if the executable was called from a different path. – Fujii Sep 11 '17 at 20:13
8

if you use this way :

dir, err := filepath.Abs(filepath.Dir(os.Args[0]))
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
fmt.Println(dir)

you will get the /tmp path when you are running program using some IDE like GoLang because the executable will save and run from /tmp

i think the best way for getting the currentWorking Directory or '.' is :

import(
  "os" 
  "fmt"
  "log"
)

func main() {
  dir, err := os.Getwd()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
  fmt.Println(dir)
}

the os.Getwd() function will return the current working directory. and its all without using of any external library :D

|improve this answer|||||
  • This is not correct. This returns the working directory of the user executing the process and not the directory of the file. Use filepath.abs. – PodTech.io Mar 1 at 19:50
  • 1
    it returns the working Directory of the running executable file. then if you are using an IDE like goland and there is no config for working directory in the build options then it will run from /tmp , then what usage /tmp have for you!??but if you use os.Getwd() it returns the .exe or elf executable file path. not /tmp. – Bit Mar 2 at 12:30
5

If you use package osext by kardianos and you need to test locally, like Derek Dowling commented:

This works fine until you'd like to use it with go run main.go for local development. Not sure how best to get around that without building an executable beforehand each time.

The solution to this is to make a gorun.exe utility instead of using go run. The gorun.exe utility would compile the project using "go build", then run it right after, in the normal directory of your project.

I had this issue with other compilers and found myself making these utilities since they are not shipped with the compiler... it is especially arcane with tools like C where you have to compile and link and then run it (too much work).

If anyone likes my idea of gorun.exe (or elf) I will likely upload it to github soon..

Sorry, this answer is meant as a comment, but I cannot comment due to me not having a reputation big enough yet.

Alternatively, "go run" could be modified (if it does not have this feature already) to have a parameter such as "go run -notemp" to not run the program in a temporary directory (or something similar). But I would prefer just typing out gorun or "gor" as it is shorter than a convoluted parameter. Gorun.exe or gor.exe would need to be installed in the same directory as your go compiler

Implementing gorun.exe (or gor.exe) would be trivial, as I have done it with other compilers in only a few lines of code... (famous last words ;-)

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    If you want it to both work with "go run" and built executable then simply use _, callerFile, _, _ := runtime.Caller(0) executablePath := filepath.Dir(callerFile) instead – Jocelyn Jul 24 '17 at 9:16
4

Sometimes this is enough, the first argument will always be the file path

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
)


func main() {
    fmt.Println(os.Args[0])

    // or
    dir, _ := os.Getwd()
    fmt.Println(dir)
}
|improve this answer|||||
3

os.Executable: https://tip.golang.org/pkg/os/#Executable

filepath.EvalSymlinks: https://golang.org/pkg/path/filepath/#EvalSymlinks

Full Demo:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    var dirAbsPath string
    ex, err := os.Executable()
    if err == nil {
        dirAbsPath = filepath.Dir(ex)
        fmt.Println(dirAbsPath)
        return
    }

    exReal, err := filepath.EvalSymlinks(ex)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    dirAbsPath = filepath.Dir(exReal)
    fmt.Println(dirAbsPath)
}
|improve this answer|||||
0

Gustavo Niemeyer's answer is great. But in Windows, runtime proc is mostly in another dir, like this:

"C:\Users\XXX\AppData\Local\Temp"

If you use relative file path, like "/config/api.yaml", this will use your project path where your code exists.

|improve this answer|||||

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