19

Say I define the following class:

class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self, x, y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

Normally, one would instantiate this class in one of the following ways:

>>> MyClass(1,2)
<__main__.MyClass object at 0x8acbf8c>
>>> MyClass(1, y=2)
<__main__.MyClass object at 0x8acbeac>
>>> MyClass(x=1, y=2)
<__main__.MyClass object at 0x8acbf8c>
>>> MyClass(y=2, x=1)
<__main__.MyClass object at 0x8acbeac>

Which is just fine and dandy.

Now, we try with an invalid keyword argument and see what happens:

>>> MyClass(x=1, j=2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'j'

Python correctly raises a type error and complains about the unexpected keyword argument 'j'.

Now, we can try with two invalid keyword arguments:

>>> MyClass(i=1,j=2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'

Notice, that two of the keyword arguments were invalid, but Python is only complaining about one of them, 'i' in this case.

Lets reverse the order of the invalid keyword arguments:

>>> MyClass(j=2, i=1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'

That is interesting. I changed the order of the invalid keyword arguments, but Python still decides to complain about 'i' and not 'j'. So Python obviously doesn't simply pick the first invalid key to complain about.

Lets try some more:

>>> MyClass(c=2, i=1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'
>>> MyClass(q=2, i=1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'

Alphabetically, I tried a letter before i and one after i, so Python is not complaining alphabetically.

Here are some more, this time with i in the first position:

>>> MyClass(i=1, j=2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'
>>> MyClass(i=1, b=2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'i'
>>> MyClass(i=1, a=2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'a'

Aha! I got it to complain about 'a' instead of 'i'.

My question is, when invalid keyword arguments are given to a class constructor, how does Python determine which one to complain about?

  • 1
    As a side note, a class constructor call works exactly the same way as a call to a function (or method), so you can simplify your tests a little bit. – abarnert Aug 30 '13 at 18:27
  • @abarnert Do they? I am getting: def my_func(x, y): pass, then my_func(i=2, a=1) complains about 'i', while MyClass(i=2, a=1) complains about 'a'. – DJG Aug 30 '13 at 18:40
  • As described in the answer by @MartijnPieters, the behavior is undefined. Thus, results from testing in practice are not necessarily useful or applicable. – Charles Duffy Aug 30 '13 at 18:42
  • Yes they do. Use the dis module to look at the bytecode and you'll see that both use CALL_FUNCTION.(Also note that, since python isn't statically typed, the interpreter cannot distinguish between a class/callable/function until after starting the execution of the call). Also note that the __init__ method has a self parameter. If you define a class with def __init__(self, x): pass then it complains about i again. It seems like the number of parameters of a function matter. – Bakuriu Aug 30 '13 at 18:44
17

Keyword arguments are stored in a dictionary, and dictionary order (e.g. arbitrary, based on the hashing algorithm, hash collisions and insertion history) applies.

For your first sample, a dictionary with both i and j keys results in i being listed first:

>>> dict(j=2, i=1)
{'i': 1, 'j': 2}

Note that the {...} literal dict notation inserts keys from right-to-left, while keyword parsing inserts keywords from left-to-right (this is a CPython implementation detail); hence the use of the dict() constructor in the above example.

This matters when two keys hash to the same slot, like i and a:

>>> dict(i=1, a=2)
{'a': 2, 'i': 1}
>>> {'i': 1, 'a': 2}
{'i': 1, 'a': 2}

Dictionary output order is highly dependent on the insertion and deletion history and the specific Python implementation; Python 3.3 introduced a random hash seed to prevent a serious denial of service vector, for example, which means that the dictionary order will be radically different even between Python processes.

  • I thought so too, but compare MyClass(**{'i': 1, 'a': 2}) vs. MyClass(i=1, a=2). The first reports i, while the second reports a. Shouldn't it be the same thing? – Claudiu Aug 30 '13 at 18:25
  • There is no guarantee on the ordering of a dictionary. No result can be generalized... – user2722968 Aug 30 '13 at 18:26
  • 1
    @Claudiu: The order of iteration for a dict is arbitrary. So no, you can never predict that it will be the same thing. And if you want to know why exactly it's different in some particular case, beyond just "it's allowed to be different, and often it is", you have to dig into the lower levels of the interpreter and the dict object. – abarnert Aug 30 '13 at 18:27
  • @abarnert: that's what i'm curious about, i suppose. if you define the same dict in the same interpreter in the same way then the order will be the same - there's no randomization there. i guess the answer is that the keyword dict is constructed differently in the 2 different approaches – Claudiu Aug 30 '13 at 18:27
  • 5
    If you want to see the relevant CPython source for CALL_FUNCTION and related opcodes, look for _call_function_var_kw in ceval.c (the link above is to the 3.3 branch) and ext_do_call in the same file. Basically, the names and values are pushed onto the stack left-first by the caller, and then CALL_FUNCTION pops them off. – abarnert Aug 30 '13 at 18:31

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