175

What's a quick-and-dirty way to make sure that only one instance of a shell script is running at a given time?

39 Answers 39

0

Here is a more elegant, fail-safe, quick & dirty method, combining the answers provided above.

Usage

  1. include sh_lock_functions.sh
  2. init using sh_lock_init
  3. lock using sh_acquire_lock
  4. check lock using sh_check_lock
  5. unlock using sh_remove_lock

Script File

sh_lock_functions.sh

#!/bin/bash

function sh_lock_init {
    sh_lock_scriptName=$(basename $0)
    sh_lock_dir="/tmp/${sh_lock_scriptName}.lock" #lock directory
    sh_lock_file="${sh_lock_dir}/lockPid.txt" #lock file
}

function sh_acquire_lock {
    if mkdir $sh_lock_dir 2>/dev/null; then #check for lock
        echo "$sh_lock_scriptName lock acquired successfully.">&2
        touch $sh_lock_file
        echo $$ > $sh_lock_file # set current pid in lockFile
        return 0
    else
        touch $sh_lock_file
        read sh_lock_lastPID < $sh_lock_file
        if [ ! -z "$sh_lock_lastPID" -a -d /proc/$sh_lock_lastPID ]; then # if lastPID is not null and a process with that pid exists
            echo "$sh_lock_scriptName is already running.">&2
            return 1
        else
            echo "$sh_lock_scriptName stopped during execution, reacquiring lock.">&2
            echo $$ > $sh_lock_file # set current pid in lockFile
            return 2
        fi
    fi
    return 0
}

function sh_check_lock {
    [[ ! -f $sh_lock_file ]] && echo "$sh_lock_scriptName lock file removed.">&2 && return 1
    read sh_lock_lastPID < $sh_lock_file
    [[ $sh_lock_lastPID -ne $$ ]] && echo "$sh_lock_scriptName lock file pid has changed.">&2  && return 2
    echo "$sh_lock_scriptName lock still in place.">&2
    return 0
}

function sh_remove_lock {
    rm -r $sh_lock_dir
}

Usage example

sh_lock_usage_example.sh

#!/bin/bash
. /path/to/sh_lock_functions.sh # load sh lock functions

sh_lock_init || exit $?

sh_acquire_lock
lockStatus=$?
[[ $lockStatus -eq 1 ]] && exit $lockStatus
[[ $lockStatus -eq 2 ]] && echo "lock is set, do some resume from crash procedures";

#monitoring example
cnt=0
while sh_check_lock # loop while lock is in place
do
    echo "$sh_scriptName running (pid $$)"
    sleep 1
    let cnt++
    [[ $cnt -gt 5 ]] && break
done

#remove lock when process finished
sh_remove_lock || exit $?

exit 0

Features

  • Uses a combination of file, directory and process id to lock to make sure that the process is not already running
  • You can detect if the script stopped before lock removal (eg. process kill, shutdown, error etc.)
  • You can check the lock file, and use it to trigger a process shutdown when the lock is missing
  • Verbose, outputs error messages for easier debug
0

why dont we use something like

pgrep -f $cmd || $cmd
  • Because that doesn't prevent starting two instances of $cmd. – Dmitry Grigoryev Oct 13 '16 at 8:58
  • unless $cmd handles it internally, this would help in checking if the $cmd is already running before launching a new process, its very similar to checking a .lock file which other scripts generally do before starting – Jabir Ahmed Oct 25 '16 at 9:30
0
if [ 1 -ne $(/bin/fuser "$0" 2>/dev/null | wc -w) ]; then
    exit 1
fi
  • 3
    Could you edit your answer to explain what this is doing, and how it solves the problem? – Kenster Nov 30 '15 at 14:05
  • 1
    While this may answer the question it’s always a good idea to put some text in your answer to explain what you're doing. Read how to write a good answer. – Jørgen R Nov 30 '15 at 14:21
0

I have a simple solution based on the file name

#!/bin/bash

MY_FILENAME=`basename "$BASH_SOURCE"`

MY_PROCESS_COUNT=$(ps a -o pid,cmd | grep $MY_FILENAME | grep -v grep | grep -v $$ | wc -
l)

if [ $MY_PROCESS_COUNT -ne 0  ]; then
  echo found another process
  exit 0
if

# Follows the code to get the job done.
0

Late to the party, using the idea from @Majal, this is my script to start only one instance of emacsclient GUI. With it, I can set shortcutkey to open or jump back to the same emacsclient. I have another script to call emacsclient in terminals when I need it. The use of emacsclient here is just to show a working example, one can choose something else. This approach is quick and good enough for my tiny scripts. Tell me where it is dirty :)

#!/bin/bash

# if [ $(pgrep -c $(basename $0)) -lt 2 ]; then # this works but requires script name to be unique
if [ $(pidof -x "$0"|wc -w ) -lt 3 ]; then
    echo -e "Starting $(basename $0)"
    emacsclient --alternate-editor="" -c "$@"
else
    echo -e "$0 is running already"
fi
  • Why -lt 3? wouldn't it start then if there is already exactly one instance running already? or does emaxclient always start 2 instances? – rubo77 Sep 22 '16 at 21:45
0

This one line answer comes from someone related Ask Ubuntu Q&A:

[ "${FLOCKER}" != "$0" ] && exec env FLOCKER="$0" flock -en "$0" "$0" "$@" || :
#     This is useful boilerplate code for shell scripts.  Put it at the top  of
#     the  shell script you want to lock and it'll automatically lock itself on
#     the first run.  If the env var $FLOCKER is not set to  the  shell  script
#     that  is being run, then execute flock and grab an exclusive non-blocking
#     lock (using the script itself as the lock file) before re-execing  itself
#     with  the right arguments.  It also sets the FLOCKER env var to the right
#     value so it doesn't run again.
0

This I have not found mentioned anywhere, it uses read, I don't exactly know if read is actually atomic but it has served me well so far..., it is juicy because it is only bash builtins, this is an in process implementation, you start the locker coprocess and use its i/o to manage locks, the same can be done interprocess by just swapping the target i/o from the locker file descriptors to a on filesystem file descriptor (exec 3<>/file && exec 4</file)

## gives locks
locker() {
    locked=false
    while read l; do
        case "$l" in
            lock)
                if $locked; then
                    echo false
                else
                    locked=true
                    echo true
                fi
                ;;
            unlock)
                if $locked; then
                    locked=false
                    echo true
                else
                    echo false
                fi
                ;;
            *)
                echo false
                ;;
        esac
    done
}
## locks
lock() {
    local response
    echo lock >&${locker[1]}
    read -ru ${locker[0]} response
    $response && return 0 || return 1
}

## unlocks
unlock() {
    local response
    echo unlock >&${locker[1]}
    read -ru ${locker[0]} response
    $response && return 0 || return 1
}
-1

This will work, if your script name is unique:

#!/bin/bash
if [ $(pgrep -c $(basename $0)) -gt 1 ]; then 
  echo $(basename $0) is already running
  exit 0
fi

If the scriptname is not unique, this works on most linux distributions:

#!/bin/bash
exec 9>/tmp/my_lock_file
if ! flock -n 9  ; then
   echo "another instance of this script is already running";
   exit 1
fi

source: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/045

-2

Try something like the below,

ab=`ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep -wc processname`

Then match the variable with 1 using an if loop.

  • In this case I would use something like ab=ps -ef | egrep -v "(grep|$$)" | grep -wc processname So it wouldn't match to the current process if purpose of the check is to disallow multiple instances of current script. – Tagar Aug 13 '14 at 20:57

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