19

I need to hash a big database of values quite often. Thus, a fast implementation of a SHA-2 hasher is needed. I'm currently using the SHA256.

The sha256_transform algorithm I'm using right now is this: http://bradconte.com/sha256_c (code below)

I have profiled my code and this snippet is taking exactly 96% of computing time per hash, making this function critical to my goals.

It operates on a 64-byte long binary string named data[] and outputs the result in ctx->state.

I ask for a faster version of this function. Keep in mind that even slight modifications can impact speed negatively.

#define uchar unsigned char
#define uint unsigned int

#define ROTLEFT(a,b) (((a) << (b)) | ((a) >> (32-(b))))
#define ROTRIGHT(a,b) (((a) >> (b)) | ((a) << (32-(b))))

#define CH(x,y,z) (((x) & (y)) ^ (~(x) & (z)))
#define MAJ(x,y,z) (((x) & (y)) ^ ((x) & (z)) ^ ((y) & (z)))
#define EP0(x) (ROTRIGHT(x,2) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,13) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,22))
#define EP1(x) (ROTRIGHT(x,6) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,11) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,25))
#define SIG0(x) (ROTRIGHT(x,7) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,18) ^ ((x) >> 3))
#define SIG1(x) (ROTRIGHT(x,17) ^ ROTRIGHT(x,19) ^ ((x) >> 10))

void sha256_transform(SHA256_CTX *ctx, uchar data[]) {
    uint a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,t1,t2,m[64];

    a = ctx->state[0];
    b = ctx->state[1];
    c = ctx->state[2];
    d = ctx->state[3];
    e = ctx->state[4];
    f = ctx->state[5];
    g = ctx->state[6];
    h = ctx->state[7];

    for (i=0,j=0; i < 16; i++, j += 4)
        m[i] = (data[j] << 24) | (data[j+1] << 16) | (data[j+2] << 8) | (data[j+3]);

    for ( ; i < 64; i++)
        m[i] = SIG1(m[i-2]) + m[i-7] + SIG0(m[i-15]) + m[i-16];

    for (i = 0; i < 64; ++i) {
        t1 = h + EP1(e) + CH(e,f,g) + k[i] + m[i];
        t2 = EP0(a) + MAJ(a,b,c);
        h = g;
        g = f;
        f = e;
        e = d + t1;
        d = c;
        c = b;
        b = a;
        a = t1 + t2;
    }

    ctx->state[0] += a;
    ctx->state[1] += b;
    ctx->state[2] += c;
    ctx->state[3] += d;
    ctx->state[4] += e;
    ctx->state[5] += f;
    ctx->state[6] += g;
    ctx->state[7] += h;
}
4
  • If you are happy to limit your code to x86 then it looks like there might be opportunities for SIMD optimisation using SSE/AVX2.
    – Paul R
    Aug 31, 2013 at 8:45
  • 3
    It takes 96% of the time not because it's poorly written, but because it's inherently complex. This has been optimized quite well, so if you need to spend less time computing it, look for ways to call it less often. Aug 31, 2013 at 8:45
  • Is there something your current code can't do right now because this is taking your CPU to new thermal heights?
    – WhozCraig
    Aug 31, 2013 at 8:49
  • +1 for common sense. Alternatively, I know multithreading is a must-have here but it's not the point of the question. Actually yes, I'm asking because of both speed AND overheat of the processor. Aug 31, 2013 at 8:57

4 Answers 4

14

You may want to checkout/profile this implementation of SHA256.

Being used in cgminer (a popular bitcoin mining software), it is written specifically keeping performance in mind. It includes 4-way SIMD implementations using SSE2. It follows the same approach as the bradconte sha256_transform algorithm mentioned in the question. The code is too long to reproduce here.

Also the license is fairly permissive, allowing re-use/distribution as long as the original authors are accredited.

3
  • Hmm, just curious. From that C source code that you linked to, where are 4-way SIMD implementations using SSE2 that you're mentioning?
    – c00000fd
    Jul 6, 2017 at 22:16
  • 1
    @c00000fd Updated the answer with direct link to sha256_4way.c. Jul 7, 2017 at 5:17
  • Is there a similar implementation for sha512? It's not used in cgminer. Jul 19, 2022 at 11:41
9

SHA256 performance optimization in C ...

Now that the Goldmont micro-architecture has been released, it includes Intel's SHA extensions. You can get a 5x-6x speedup in the compress function using the CPU instructions. For example, proposed code for a crypto library witnessed the following (the test occurred on a Celeron J3455, which runs at 1.5 GHz, but bursts at 2.3 GHz):

  • C++ implementation
    $ ./botan speed --msec=3000 SHA-1 SHA-224 SHA-256
    SHA-160 [base] hash 274.826 MiB/sec (824.480 MiB in 3000.009 ms)
    SHA-224 [base] hash 92.349 MiB/sec (277.051 MiB in 3000.027 ms)
    SHA-256 [base] hash 92.364 MiB/sec (277.094 MiB in 3000.027 ms)
  • Intel SHA extensions
    $ ./botan speed --msec=3000 SHA-1 SHA-224 SHA-256
    SHA-160 [base] hash 1195.907 MiB/sec (3587.723 MiB in 3000.000 ms)
    SHA-224 [base] hash 535.740 MiB/sec (1607.219 MiB in 3000.000 ms)
    SHA-256 [base] hash 535.970 MiB/sec (1607.914 MiB in 3000.005 ms)

Here is the code for the SHA256 compress function using Intel SHA extensions with intrinsics. Its based on Sean Gulley's blog at Intel® SHA Extensions, and his sample code in mitls | hacl-star | experimental.

The compress function below only handles full blocks of 64-bytes. You need to setup the initial state, and you need to pad the last block. It looks like you have that covered in your sample code.

#include <immintrin.h>
...

void compress(uint32_t state[8], const uint8_t input[], size_t blocks)
{
    __m128i STATE0, STATE1;
    __m128i MSG, TMP, MASK;
    __m128i TMSG0, TMSG1, TMSG2, TMSG3;
    __m128i ABEF_SAVE, CDGH_SAVE;

    // Load initial values
    TMP = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*) &state[0]);
    STATE1 = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*) &state[4]);
    MASK = _mm_set_epi64x(0x0c0d0e0f08090a0bULL, 0x0405060700010203ULL);

    TMP = _mm_shuffle_epi32(TMP, 0xB1); // CDAB
    STATE1 = _mm_shuffle_epi32(STATE1, 0x1B); // EFGH
    STATE0 = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMP, STATE1, 8); // ABEF
    STATE1 = _mm_blend_epi16(STATE1, TMP, 0xF0); // CDGH

    while (blocks)
    {
        // Save current hash
        ABEF_SAVE = STATE0;
        CDGH_SAVE = STATE1;

        // Rounds 0-3
        MSG = _mm_loadu_si128((const __m128i*) (input+0));
        TMSG0 = _mm_shuffle_epi8(MSG, MASK);
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, _mm_set_epi64x(0xE9B5DBA5B5C0FBCFULL, 0x71374491428A2F98ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);

        // Rounds 4-7
        TMSG1 = _mm_loadu_si128((const __m128i*) (input+16));
        TMSG1 = _mm_shuffle_epi8(TMSG1, MASK);
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, _mm_set_epi64x(0xAB1C5ED5923F82A4ULL, 0x59F111F13956C25BULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG1);

        // Rounds 8-11
        TMSG2 = _mm_loadu_si128((const __m128i*) (input+32));
        TMSG2 = _mm_shuffle_epi8(TMSG2, MASK);
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, _mm_set_epi64x(0x550C7DC3243185BEULL, 0x12835B01D807AA98ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG2);

        // Rounds 12-15
        TMSG3 = _mm_loadu_si128((const __m128i*) (input+48));
        TMSG3 = _mm_shuffle_epi8(TMSG3, MASK);
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, _mm_set_epi64x(0xC19BF1749BDC06A7ULL, 0x80DEB1FE72BE5D74ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG3, TMSG2, 4);
        TMSG0 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, TMP);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG3);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG3);

        // Rounds 16-19
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, _mm_set_epi64x(0x240CA1CC0FC19DC6ULL, 0xEFBE4786E49B69C1ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG0, TMSG3, 4);
        TMSG1 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, TMP);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG0);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG0);

        // Rounds 20-23
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, _mm_set_epi64x(0x76F988DA5CB0A9DCULL, 0x4A7484AA2DE92C6FULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG1, TMSG0, 4);
        TMSG2 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, TMP);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG1);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG1);

        // Rounds 24-27
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, _mm_set_epi64x(0xBF597FC7B00327C8ULL, 0xA831C66D983E5152ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG2, TMSG1, 4);
        TMSG3 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, TMP);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG2);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG2);

        // Rounds 28-31
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, _mm_set_epi64x(0x1429296706CA6351ULL,  0xD5A79147C6E00BF3ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG3, TMSG2, 4);
        TMSG0 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, TMP);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG3);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG3);

        // Rounds 32-35
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, _mm_set_epi64x(0x53380D134D2C6DFCULL, 0x2E1B213827B70A85ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG0, TMSG3, 4);
        TMSG1 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, TMP);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG0);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG0);

        // Rounds 36-39
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, _mm_set_epi64x(0x92722C8581C2C92EULL, 0x766A0ABB650A7354ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG1, TMSG0, 4);
        TMSG2 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, TMP);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG1);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG1);

        // Rounds 40-43
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, _mm_set_epi64x(0xC76C51A3C24B8B70ULL, 0xA81A664BA2BFE8A1ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG2, TMSG1, 4);
        TMSG3 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, TMP);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG2);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG2);

        // Rounds 44-47
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, _mm_set_epi64x(0x106AA070F40E3585ULL, 0xD6990624D192E819ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG3, TMSG2, 4);
        TMSG0 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, TMP);
        TMSG0 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG0, TMSG3);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG3);

        // Rounds 48-51
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG0, _mm_set_epi64x(0x34B0BCB52748774CULL, 0x1E376C0819A4C116ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG0, TMSG3, 4);
        TMSG1 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, TMP);
        TMSG1 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG1, TMSG0);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg1_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG0);

        // Rounds 52-55
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG1, _mm_set_epi64x(0x682E6FF35B9CCA4FULL, 0x4ED8AA4A391C0CB3ULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG1, TMSG0, 4);
        TMSG2 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, TMP);
        TMSG2 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG2, TMSG1);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);

        // Rounds 56-59
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG2, _mm_set_epi64x(0x8CC7020884C87814ULL, 0x78A5636F748F82EEULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        TMP = _mm_alignr_epi8(TMSG2, TMSG1, 4);
        TMSG3 = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, TMP);
        TMSG3 = _mm_sha256msg2_epu32(TMSG3, TMSG2);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);

        // Rounds 60-63
        MSG = _mm_add_epi32(TMSG3, _mm_set_epi64x(0xC67178F2BEF9A3F7ULL, 0xA4506CEB90BEFFFAULL));
        STATE1 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE1, STATE0, MSG);
        MSG = _mm_shuffle_epi32(MSG, 0x0E);
        STATE0 = _mm_sha256rnds2_epu32(STATE0, STATE1, MSG);

        // Add values back to state
        STATE0 = _mm_add_epi32(STATE0, ABEF_SAVE);
        STATE1 = _mm_add_epi32(STATE1, CDGH_SAVE);

        input += 64;
        blocks--;
    }

    TMP = _mm_shuffle_epi32(STATE0, 0x1B); // FEBA
    STATE1 = _mm_shuffle_epi32(STATE1, 0xB1); // DCHG
    STATE0 = _mm_blend_epi16(TMP, STATE1, 0xF0); // DCBA
    STATE1 = _mm_alignr_epi8(STATE1, TMP, 8); // ABEF

    // Save state
    _mm_storeu_si128((__m128i*) &state[0], STATE0);
    _mm_storeu_si128((__m128i*) &state[4], STATE1);
}

You can find source for both Intel SHA intrinsics and ARMv8 SHA intrinsics at Noloader GitHub | SHA-Intrinsics. They are C source files, and provide the compress function for SHA-1, SHA-224 and SHA-256. The intrinsic based implementations increase throughput approximately 3x to 4x for SHA-1, and approximately 6x to 12x for SHA-224 and SHA-256.

8

Update 2

You really should use Intel's ISA-L_crypto, which is Intel's reference library for crypto primatives. The original post links to Intel's older reference code, which was absorbed into ISA-L_crypto.

Using the example below, my laptop gets ~4 GB/s per core:

$ git clone http://github.com/01org/isa-l_crypto
$ cd isa-l_crypto
$ ./autogen.sh && ./configure
$ make -j $(nproc)
$ cd sha256_mb
$ gcc sha256_mb_vs_ossl_perf.c -march=native -O3 -Wall -I../include ../.libs/libisal_crypto.a -lcrypto
$ ./a.out
sha256_openssl_cold: runtime =     511833 usecs, bandwidth 640 MB in 0.5118 sec = 1311.15 MB/s
multibinary_sha256_cold: runtime =     172098 usecs, bandwidth 640 MB in 0.1721 sec = 3899.46 MB/s
Multi-buffer sha256 test complete 32 buffers of 1048576 B with 20 iterations
 multibinary_sha256_ossl_perf: Pass

Original Post

This is the Intel reference implementation:

http://downloadmirror.intel.com/22357/eng/sha256_code_release_v2.zip

And the code is described in:

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/intelligent-systems/intel-technology/sha-256-implementations-paper.html

I get about 350 MB/s on a haswell based Xeon microprocessor (E5-2650 v3). It is implemented in assembly and takes advantage of Intel AES-NI.

Older Update:

The latest Intel reference implementation for SHA (now part of ISA-L_crypto) is located at:

https://github.com/01org/isa-l_crypto/tree/master/sha256_mb

2
  • 10
    This has nothing to do with AES-NI instruction set. This is plain SSE4 or AVX opcodes. Feb 21, 2015 at 11:16
  • 2
    The code above uses AVX, AVX2 and SSE4. Instead, Intel's code that uses SHA256RNDS2, SHA256MSG1 and SHA256MSG2 instructions (yes, three SHA256-specialized instructions) are much faster, and can be found here: software.intel.com/en-us/articles/… Don't forget to __get_cpuid(7, &eax, &ebx, &ecx, &edx) && (ebx >> 29) & 1)
    – MCCCS
    Apr 19, 2018 at 15:09
0

Check out the implementation of Dr Brian Gladman - http://www.gladman.me.uk/. Its about 15% faster then the one in cgminer. I don't think you can do much better without using SSE

1
  • I can not confirm your claim that Brians code is 15% faster. With the same compiler settings (-O2, otherwise VS2019 default settigns), the basic sha2.c algortithm included in cgminer is about 20% faster on 32bytes of data.
    – nqtronix
    Aug 27, 2021 at 13:15

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