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I am trying to send UTC time-stamp to rest service from my javascript client. i was not able to create time-stamp like "2013-08-30T19:52:28.226Z" using javascript.

var rawDate = date.getUTCDate().toString();

i see this example but not helpful for me. utc-time-stame-javascript

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6 Answers 6

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You can use date.toJSON().

new Date().toJSON()
"2013-08-31T09:05:07.740Z"

See MDN or MSDN

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  • see my desire result 2013-08-31T9:9:55.893Z Aug 31, 2013 at 9:11
  • Oh ow. A W3 Schools link? Here's a better resource discussing the function: MDN Date#toJSON Aug 31, 2013 at 9:11
  • 1
    What's the issue with W3 Schools ? Aug 31, 2013 at 9:13
  • @shashank-shukla I don't get it, what's different ? Aug 31, 2013 at 9:16
  • 1
    @ArturCarvalho, according to this answer, they are identical, except that toISOString() requires IE9+ Sep 11, 2018 at 8:22
1

1) Get the date.

var now = new Date();

2) Convert to UTC format like below, for reference.

var now_utc = new Date(now.getUTCFullYear(), now.getUTCMonth(), now.getUTCDate(), 
                  now.getUTCHours(), now.getUTCMinutes(), now.getUTCSeconds());

3) Using toJSON, get the format.

now_utc.toJSON()

Finally,

var now = new Date();
var now_utc = new Date(now.getUTCFullYear(), now.getUTCMonth(), now.getUTCDate(),  now.getUTCHours(), now.getUTCMinutes(), now.getUTCSeconds());
alert(now_utc.toJSON());

Check this JSFiddle

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  • Not utc time.. 2013-08-31T03:44:49.000Z Aug 31, 2013 at 9:17
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function getUTCISODateString(d){
     function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n};
     function threePad(n){return n<10 ? '00'+n : (n < 100 ? '0' + n : n)};
     return d.getUTCFullYear()+'-'
          + pad(d.getUTCMonth()+1)+'-'
          + pad(d.getUTCDate())+'T'
          + pad(d.getUTCHours())+':'
          + pad(d.getUTCMinutes())+':'
          + pad(d.getUTCSeconds())+ '.'
                  + threePad(d.getUTCSeconds()) + 'Z';
}

Not tested :

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  • new Date().toJSON() Aug 31, 2013 at 9:23
  • If IE7 were a concern for support then I'd bring in a library like json2 to polyfill that functionality onto Date as well as JSON.stringify and JSON.parse. Aug 31, 2013 at 9:31
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This library can do it for you. Not that big either http://momentjs.com

moment().toISOString() 
// 2013-02-04T22:44:30.652Z
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  • The format is off. His requirements call for milliseconds appended before timezone. Aug 31, 2013 at 9:15
  • The inclusion of moment here (while a great library) is unnecessary unless more date processing needs to be done. As answered by Benoit Blanchon this can be achieved natively with new Date().toJSON() but even simpler with JSON.stringify({post_date: new Date()}); in which case it's called automatically. I should have mentioned this earlier, but good on the update! Aug 31, 2013 at 9:22
  • @izuriel I did notice that after i read your other comment JSON.stringify will do it Aug 31, 2013 at 9:24
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I would suggest extending the Date() object and building the string yourself, moment does it for you but I'm not sure it's in the exact format you need. Just wrote this up quickly, but it should be a decent starter boiler plate.

Date.prototype.toLongUTCString = function () {
   var self = this;
   return self.getUTCFullYear() + '-' + (self.getUTCMonth() < 10 ? '0' : '') + 
          (self.getUTCMonth() +1)+ '-' + (self.getUTCDate() < 10 ? '0' : '') + 
          self.getUTCDate() + 'T' + self.getUTCHours() + ':' + self.getUTCMinutes() + 
          ':' + self.getUTCSeconds() + '.' + self.getUTCMilliseconds() + 'Z';
   };

See more:

http://jsfiddle.net/4Kczy/

/edit: no one bothered to ask what browsers need to be supported (cough, IE).

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  • This functionality can be added to the Date class as well as full JSON parsing/string building with the json2 library. A common rule of thumb, by the way, is avoid extending core classes as much as possible. Aug 31, 2013 at 9:34
  • @izuriel - it depends what you're extending - e.g. this function will never be implemented in the core spec (unlike map/filter/reduce might be implemented at some point in the future in IE). As for the json2 lib - you don't always need a chainsaw to cut down a branch. Cheers!
    – konp
    Aug 31, 2013 at 9:51
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const date = new Date()
const timestamp = date.toJSON()
const humanReadableDate = date.toLocaleString()
console.log(date)              // Fri Mar 18 2022 21:22:57 GMT-0700 (Pacific Daylight Time)
console.log(timestamp)         // 2022-03-19T04:22:57.983Z
console.log(humanReadableDate) // 3/18/2022, 9:22:57 PM

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