362

Using LINQ, from a List<int>, how can I retrieve a list that contains entries repeated more than once and their values?

616

The easiest way to solve the problem is to group the elements based on their value, and then pick a representative of the group if there are more than one element in the group. In LINQ, this translates to:

var query = lst.GroupBy(x => x)
              .Where(g => g.Count() > 1)
              .Select(y => y.Key)
              .ToList();

If you want to know how many times the elements are repeated, you can use:

var query = lst.GroupBy(x => x)
              .Where(g => g.Count() > 1)
              .Select(y => new { Element = y.Key, Counter = y.Count() })
              .ToList();

This will return a List of an anonymous type, and each element will have the properties Element and Counter, to retrieve the information you need.

And lastly, if it's a dictionary you are looking for, you can use

var query = lst.GroupBy(x => x)
              .Where(g => g.Count() > 1)
              .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, y => y.Count());

This will return a dictionary, with your element as key, and the number of times it's repeated as value.

| improve this answer | |
  • Now just a wonder, let's say that duplicated int are distributed into n int arrays, im using dictionary and for loop to understand which array contains a duplicate and remove it according to a logic of distribution, is there a fastest way (linq wondering) to achieve that result ? thank you in advance for interest. – Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 11:25
  • I'm doing something like this : code for (int i = 0; i < duplicates.Count; i++) { int duplicate = duplicates[i]; duplicatesLocation.Add(duplicate, new List<int>()); for (int k = 0; k < hitsList.Length; k++) { if (hitsList[k].Contains(duplicate)) { duplicatesLocation.ElementAt(i).Value.Add(k); } } // remove duplicates according to some rules. } code – Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 11:26
  • if you want to find duplicates in a list of arrays, give a look to SelectMany – Save Aug 31 '13 at 15:31
  • I'm searching for duplicates in an array of lists, but didnt get how selectmany can help me to make it out – Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 19:18
  • 2
    To check if any collection has more than one element if is more efficient to use Skip(1).Any() instead of Count(). Imagine a collection with 1000 elements. Skip(1).Any() will detect there is more than 1 once it finds the 2nd element. Using Count() requires to access the complete collection. – Harald Coppoolse Oct 26 '17 at 8:03
149

Find out if an enumerable contains any duplicate :

var anyDuplicate = enumerable.GroupBy(x => x.Key).Any(g => g.Count() > 1);

Find out if all values in an enumerable are unique :

var allUnique = enumerable.GroupBy(x => x.Key).All(g => g.Count() == 1);
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  • 1
    Is there any possibility these are not always boolean opposites? anyDuplicate == !allUnique in all cases. – Garr Godfrey Oct 26 '18 at 22:46
  • 2
    @GarrGodfrey They are always boolean opposites – Caltor Nov 19 '18 at 17:03
22

Another way is using HashSet:

var hash = new HashSet<int>();
var duplicates = list.Where(i => !hash.Add(i));

If you want unique values in your duplicates list:

var myhash = new HashSet<int>();
var mylist = new List<int>(){1,1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4};
var duplicates = mylist.Where(item => !myhash.Add(item)).Distinct().ToList();

Here is the same solution as a generic extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector, IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
  {
    var hash = new HashSet<TKey>(comparer);
    return source.Where(item => !hash.Add(selector(item))).ToList();
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(x => x, comparer);      
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(selector, null);
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(x => x, null);
  }
}
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  • This does not work as expected. Using List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2 } as the source, the result is an IEnumerable<int> with one element having the value of 1 (where the correct duplicate value is 2) – BCA Jan 13 '17 at 21:05
  • @BCA yesterday, I think you're wrong. Check out this example: dotnetfiddle.net/GUnhUl – HuBeZa Jan 15 '17 at 11:56
  • Your fiddle prints out the correct result. However, I added the line Console.WriteLine("Count: {0}", duplicates.Count()); directly below it and it prints 6. Unless I'm missing something about the requirements for this function, there should only be 1 item in the resulting collection. – BCA Jan 16 '17 at 13:21
  • @BCA yesterday, it's a bug caused by LINQ deferred execution. I've added ToList in order to fix the issue, but it means that the method is executed as soon as it called, and not when you iterate over the results. – HuBeZa Jan 16 '17 at 14:55
  • var hash = new HashSet<int>(); var duplicates = list.Where(i => !hash.Add(i)); will lead to a list that includes all occurrences of duplicates. So if you have four occurrences of 2 in your list, then your duplicate list will contain three occurrences of 2, since only one of the 2's can be added to the HashSet. If you want your list to contain unique values for each duplicate, use this code instead: var duplicates = mylist.Where(item => !myhash.Add(item)).ToList().Distinct().ToList(); – solid_luffy Jul 25 '18 at 13:08
12

You can do this:

var list = new[] {1,2,3,1,4,2};
var duplicateItems = list.Duplicates();

With these extension methods:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Duplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
    {
        var grouped = source.GroupBy(selector);
        var moreThan1 = grouped.Where(i => i.IsMultiple());
        return moreThan1.SelectMany(i => i);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Duplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
    {
        return source.Duplicates(i => i);
    }

    public static bool IsMultiple<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
        return enumerator.MoveNext() && enumerator.MoveNext();
    }
}

Using IsMultiple() in the Duplicates method is faster than Count() because this does not iterate the whole collection.

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  • If you look at the reference source for Grouping you can see that Count() is pre computed and your solution is likely slower. – Johnbot Mar 16 '15 at 10:06
  • @Johnbot. You are right, in this case it is faster and the implementatation is likely to never changes... but it depends on an implementation detail of implemetation class behind IGrouping. With my implementaion, you know it will never iterate the whole collection. – Alex Siepman Mar 16 '15 at 16:02
  • so counting [Count()] is basically different than iterating the whole list. Count() is pre-computed but iterating the whole list is not. – Jogi Feb 2 '17 at 23:32
  • @rehan khan: I do not understand the difference between Count() and Count() – Alex Siepman Feb 3 '17 at 6:36
  • 2
    @RehanKhan: IsMultiple is NOT doing a Count(), it stops Immediately after 2 items. Just like Take(2).Count >= 2; – Alex Siepman Feb 3 '17 at 10:13
9

To find the duplicate values only :

var duplicates = list.GroupBy(x => x.Key).Any(g => g.Count() > 1);

Eg. var list = new[] {1,2,3,1,4,2};

so group by will group the numbers by their keys and will maintain the count(number of times it repeated) with it. After that, we are just checking the values who have repeated more than once.

To find the uniuqe values only :

var unique = list.GroupBy(x => x.Key).All(g => g.Count() == 1);

Eg. var list = new[] {1,2,3,1,4,2};

so group by will group the numbers by their keys and will maintain the count(number of times it repeated) with it. After that, we are just checking the values who have repeated only once means are unique.

| improve this answer | |
  • Below code will also find unique items. var unique = list.Distinct(x => x) – Malu MN Jun 8 at 7:31
6

I created a extention to response to this you could includ it in your projects, I think this return the most case when you search for duplicates in List or Linq.

Example:

//Dummy class to compare in list
public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Surname { get; set; }
    public Person(int id, string name, string surname)
    {
        this.Id = id;
        this.Name = name;
        this.Surname = surname;
    }
}


//The extention static class
public static class Extention
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> getMoreThanOnceRepeated<T>(this IEnumerable<T> extList, Func<T, object> groupProps) where T : class
    { //Return only the second and next reptition
        return extList
            .GroupBy(groupProps)
            .SelectMany(z => z.Skip(1)); //Skip the first occur and return all the others that repeats
    }
    public static IEnumerable<T> getAllRepeated<T>(this IEnumerable<T> extList, Func<T, object> groupProps) where T : class
    {
        //Get All the lines that has repeating
        return extList
            .GroupBy(groupProps)
            .Where(z => z.Count() > 1) //Filter only the distinct one
            .SelectMany(z => z);//All in where has to be retuned
    }
}

//how to use it:
void DuplicateExample()
{
    //Populate List
    List<Person> PersonsLst = new List<Person>(){
    new Person(1,"Ricardo","Figueiredo"), //fist Duplicate to the example
    new Person(2,"Ana","Figueiredo"),
    new Person(3,"Ricardo","Figueiredo"),//second Duplicate to the example
    new Person(4,"Margarida","Figueiredo"),
    new Person(5,"Ricardo","Figueiredo")//third Duplicate to the example
    };

    Console.WriteLine("All:");
    PersonsLst.ForEach(z => Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1} {2}", z.Id, z.Name, z.Surname));
    /* OUTPUT:
        All:
        1 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        2 -> Ana Figueiredo
        3 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        4 -> Margarida Figueiredo
        5 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        */

    Console.WriteLine("All lines with repeated data");
    PersonsLst.getAllRepeated(z => new { z.Name, z.Surname })
        .ToList()
        .ForEach(z => Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1} {2}", z.Id, z.Name, z.Surname));
    /* OUTPUT:
        All lines with repeated data
        1 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        3 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        5 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        */
    Console.WriteLine("Only Repeated more than once");
    PersonsLst.getMoreThanOnceRepeated(z => new { z.Name, z.Surname })
        .ToList()
        .ForEach(z => Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1} {2}", z.Id, z.Name, z.Surname));
    /* OUTPUT:
        Only Repeated more than once
        3 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        5 -> Ricardo Figueiredo
        */
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Consider using Skip(1).Any() instead of Count(). If you have 1000 duplicates, then Skip(1).Any() will stop after it finds the 2nd one. Count() will access all 1000 elements. – Harald Coppoolse Oct 26 '17 at 8:06
  • 1
    If you add this extension method, consider using HashSet.Add instead of GroupBy, as suggeted in one of the other answers. As soon as HashSet.Add finds a duplicate it will stop. Your GroupBy will continue grouping all elements, even if a group with more than one element has been found – Harald Coppoolse Oct 26 '17 at 8:08
1

Complete set of Linq to SQL extensions of Duplicates functions checked in MS SQL Server. Without using .ToList() or IEnumerable. These queries executing in SQL Server rather than in memory.. The results only return at memory.

public static class Linq2SqlExtensions {

    public class CountOfT<T> {
        public T Key { get; set; }
        public int Count { get; set; }
    }

    public static IQueryable<TKey> Duplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> groupBy)
        => source.GroupBy(groupBy).Where(w => w.Count() > 1).Select(s => s.Key);

    public static IQueryable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> groupBy)
        => source.GroupBy(groupBy).Where(w => w.Count() > 1).SelectMany(s => s);

    public static IQueryable<CountOfT<TKey>> DuplicatesCounts<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> groupBy)
        => source.GroupBy(groupBy).Where(w => w.Count() > 1).Select(y => new CountOfT<TKey> { Key = y.Key, Count = y.Count() });

    public static IQueryable<Tuple<TKey, int>> DuplicatesCountsAsTuble<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> groupBy)
        => source.GroupBy(groupBy).Where(w => w.Count() > 1).Select(s => Tuple.Create(s.Key, s.Count()));
}
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0

there is an answer but i did not understand why is not working;

var anyDuplicate = enumerable.GroupBy(x => x.Key).Any(g => g.Count() > 1);

my solution is like that in this situation;

var duplicates = model.list
                    .GroupBy(s => s.SAME_ID)
                    .Where(g => g.Count() > 1).Count() > 0;
if(duplicates) {
    doSomething();
}
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0

Linq query:

var query = from s2 in (from s in someList group s by new { s.Column1, s.Column2 } into sg select sg) where s2.Count() > 1 select s2;
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