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I was searching the net for something like a wiki database, just like wikipedia but instead stores structured content, editable by users. What I was looking for was an online database accessible by everyone where people can design the schema and data with proper versioning of both schema and data. I couldn't find any such site. I am not sure if it is my search skills or if there really is no wiki database as of now. Does anyone out there know anything like this?

I think there is a great potential for something like this. A possible example will be a website with a GUI for querying a MySQL DB where any website visitor can create DB objects and populate data.


UPDATE: I had registered the domain wikidatabase.org to get started on a tool but I didn't find enough time yet. If anyone is interested in spending some time and coding on this, please let me know at wikidatabase.org

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  • 1
    The question is sort of confusing. A wiki is a way of editing content. A database is a way of storing content. I'm sure there are many wikis that store their data in a database. Dec 6, 2009 at 8:53
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    I am talking about storing structured content editable by all of its users and query-able by a language like SQL or XQuery.
    – Faiz
    Dec 6, 2009 at 9:13
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    I get what he's asking: is there any wiki-like device that you can query like an SQL DB?
    – RCIX
    Dec 6, 2009 at 9:39

12 Answers 12

5

It's not quite what you're looking for, but Semantic Mediawiki adds database-like features to MediaWiki:

http://semantic-mediawiki.org/wiki/Semantic_MediaWiki

It's still fundamentally a Wiki, but you can add semantic tags to pages ([[foo::bar]] [[baz::1000]]) and then do database-type queries across them: SELECT baz FROM pages WHERE foo=bar would be {{#ask: [[foo::bar]] | ?baz}}. There is even an embryonic SPARQL implementation for pseudo-SQL queries.

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  • Great answer. I especially like how you explained the #ask syntax so concisely in terms of SQL. Do you know what the status of the SPARQL implementation is?
    – snth
    May 26, 2011 at 21:10
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OK this question is old, but Google led me here, so for anyone else out there looking for a wiki for structured data: Take a look at Foswiki.

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This might be like what you're looking for: dbpedia.org. They're working on extracting data from Wikipedia, and encoding it in a structured format using RDF, so that it can be queried using SPARQL.

Linkeddata.org has a big list of RDF data sets.

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  • dbpedia looks impressive. But I need an RDBMS supporting pure ANSI SQL.
    – Faiz
    Dec 7, 2009 at 17:43
  • I am accepting this answer for info about dbpedia. But I am almost convinced that there isn't really one as of now. I have started working on one now. If you are interested in joining efforts let me know.
    – Faiz
    Dec 8, 2009 at 17:02
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Do you mean something like http://www.freebase.com?

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  • Somewhat, but an RDBMS instead of a graph based one and SQL instead of some MQL.
    – Faiz
    Dec 7, 2009 at 17:37
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You should check out https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Wikidata:Main_Page which is a bit different but still may be of interest.

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  • Note that Wikidata is powered by Wikibase, which can also be run completely independent to create your own structured data projects.
    – Husky
    Dec 1, 2020 at 11:52
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Something that might come close to your requirements is Google Docs.

What's offered is document editing roughly similar to MS Word, and spreadsheets roughly similar to Excel. I'm thinking of the latter, of course.

In Google Docs, You can create spreadsheets for free; being spreadsheets, they naturally have a row-and-column structure similar to a database, and which you can define flexibly. You can also share these sheets with other people. This seems to be a by-invite-only process rather than open-to-all, but there may be other possibilities I'm not aware of, or that level of sharing might be enough for you in any case.

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  • But it doesn't support querying :(
    – Faiz
    Dec 6, 2009 at 9:15
  • That's not entirely true. The spreadsheet allows you to include functions in any cell, and a subset of those are analytical. This is a do-it-yourself database if you want it to be. Dec 6, 2009 at 9:24
  • SQL I meant, on the data set, not just a column (like in calculated column)
    – Faiz
    Nov 6, 2013 at 14:14
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mindtouch should be able to do it. It's rather easy to get data in / out. (for example: it's trivial to aggregate all the IP's for servers into one table).

I pretty much use it as a DB in the wiki itself (pages have tables, key/value..inheritance, templates, etc...) but you can also interface with the API, write dekiscript, grab the XML...

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I like this idea. I have heard of some sites that are trying to pull together large datasets for various things for open consumption, but none that would allow a wiki feel.

You could start with something as simple as an installation of phpMyAdmin with a known password that would allow people to log in, create a database, edit data and query from any other site on the web.

It might suffer from more accuracy problems than wikipedia though.

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OpenRecord, development of which seems to have halted in 2008, seems to approach this. It is a structured wiki in which pages are views on the data. Unlike RDBMSes it is loosely typed - the system tries to make a best guess about what data you entered, but defaults to text when it cannot guess. Schemas appear to have been implied.

http://openrecord.org

An example of the typing that is given is that of a date. If you enter '2008' in a record, the system interprets this as a date. If you enter 'unknown' however, the system allows that as well.

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Perhaps you might be interested in Couch DB:

Apache CouchDB is a document-oriented database that can be queried and indexed in a MapReduce fashion using JavaScript. CouchDB also offers incremental replication with bi-directional conflict detection and resolution.

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I'm working on an Open Source PHP / Symfony / PostgreSQL app that does this.

It allows multiple projects, each project can have multiple directories, each directory has a defined field structure. Admins set all this up.

Then members of the public can suggest new records, edit or report existing ones. All this is moderated and versioned.

It's early days yet but it basically works and is already in real world use in several projects.

Future plans already in progress include tools to help keep the data up to date, better searching/querying and field types that allow translations of content between languages.

There is more at http://www.directoki.org/

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I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Wikibase yet, which is the software that powers Wikidata.

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  • ANSI SQL Support?
    – Faiz
    Dec 22, 2020 at 22:12
  • @Faiz Wikibase is a Mediawiki extension, and Mediawiki is built upon regular MySQL / MariaDB / SQLlite technology. See here.
    – Husky
    Dec 23, 2020 at 23:53
  • That doesn't mean that Wikibase is SQL aware
    – Faiz
    Dec 25, 2020 at 0:45

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