3

Let's say we have two classes with same names and types of fields:

class A
 {
  private int x;
  private string y;
 }

class B
 {
  private int x;
  private string y;
 }

A a = new A();
B b = new B();
a.x = 5;
a.y = "xxx";

Is it possible to "copy" or "assign" a into b? I mean is there simple way to do it like "b=a" ?

6
  • 2
    Why would you have two classes that are exactly the same? When the have the same names and types they represent the same thing. When they have different methods you should use inhetitance.
    – Marco
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:15
  • It's a very curious idea, why would you do that ? (btw you can't do a.x=5 since it's private) Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:15
  • You can end up forced to do this if you have objects mapped to a specific EF context but happen to have a duplicate database (think staging vs production db's). Not saying it's his case, just a place that knowing this would be useful.
    – siva.k
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:26
  • @Marco I have LINQ request which processes .CSV file. And I can make resulting collection of Anonymous type similar to class I use. And I want to copy result of querry into it.
    – Dork
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:57
  • Then why using an anonymous class when you could use your class ? Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 18:06

5 Answers 5

4

The simplest way to do what you want is to use the Automapper library.

In this case you add map for these two classes:

Mapper.CreateMap<A,B>();

and then use method Map:

A a = new A();
//initialize a
B b = Mapper.Map(a);
3

I'd suggest you use reflection:

void Main()
{
    A foo = new A();
    B bar = new B();

    CopyValues(foo, bar);
}

public void CopyValues(object f, object t)
{
    Type fr = f.GetType();
    Type target = t.GetType();

    var bindingFlags = BindingFlags.Public| BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance;

    foreach(FieldInfo source in fr.GetFields(bindingFlags))
    {
        FieldInfo fi = target.GetField(source.Name, bindingFlags);
        if(fi != null)
            fi.SetValue(t, source.GetValue(f));
    }
}
3
  • 2
    I suggest you don't, because it's freaking slow.
    – user541686
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:57
  • @Mehrdad 10k iterations using reflection = 14 ms, 10k itterations with automapper = 128 ms. So I agree if by slow you mean 10x faster than the accepted answer
    – iamkrillin
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 22:09
  • Uh, I never said the accepted answer was better, did I...? Look at my answer instead, dynamic code generation is the efficient way to do it.
    – user541686
    Commented Sep 1, 2013 at 0:38
0

There's no simple way to do it in C#.
You can, however, dynamically generate your own methods via ILGenerator or Expression Trees to do this copying for you. (It's not easy if you haven't done it before though.)

Example:

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Reflection.Emit;

public class Foo
{
    private int a;
    public Foo(int a) { this.a = a; }
}

public class Program
{
    private int a;
    private static void Main()
    {
        var prog1 = new Foo(1);
        var prog2 = new Program() { a = 2 };
        TypeHelper<Foo, Program>.Copy(prog1, prog2);
    }
}

public static class TypeHelper<T1, T2> where T1 : class where T2: class
{
    public delegate void CopyAction(T1 from, T2 to);
    public static readonly CopyAction Copy = new Converter<Type, CopyAction>(t1 =>
    {
        var method = new DynamicMethod(string.Empty, null, new Type[] { t1, typeof(T2) }, t1, true);
        var gen = method.GetILGenerator();
        foreach (var field in t1.GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic))
        {
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldfld, field);
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Stfld, typeof(T2).GetField(field.Name, BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic));
        }
        return (CopyAction)method.CreateDelegate(typeof(CopyAction));
    })(typeof(T1));
}
6
  • There are two types in question A and B
    – I4V
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:50
  • 1
    @I4V: Picky, picky... better now? :) can't believe that resulted in a downvote...
    – user541686
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 17:56
  • Nope, It is still not working and you can't believe the downvote?
    – I4V
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 18:06
  • @I4V: It works fine for me (.NET 2.0). What error do you get, and what version of .NET are you running it on?
    – user541686
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 18:08
  • Use two different types as in the question.(.Net 4.5, "Common Language Runtime detected an invalid program.")
    – I4V
    Commented Aug 31, 2013 at 18:09
0

Also you can use Json.NET:

A a = new A();
string s = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(a);
B b = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<B>(s);
-1

I think you can do that with Marshal.StructureToPtr and Marshal.PtrToStructure.

See example in Marshal.StructureToPtr Method (MSDN)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.