I'm new in iOS development, and have trouble in understanding of some cases. My question is do I need variable and property at the same time?

For example I saw code like this:

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>

@interface Photo : NSObject {
    NSString* caption;
    NSString* photographer;
}
@property (retain) NSString* caption;
@property (retain) NSString* photographer;

@end

But, as I know, if I delete variables caption and photographer code still will work:

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>

@interface Photo : NSObject

@property (retain) NSString* caption;
@property (retain) NSString* photographer;

@end

So, please explain the difference of using first one and second.

Thanks, for any advices!

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Variables inside the {} parenthesis are instance variables. They're accessible only to the class.

@property defines a few different things denoted by the (options).

Most people use @property to convenience methods inside your .m and .h files. For example

@property (strong) NSString *string;

Creates two methods inside your .h and .m file, invisible to you though, called:

-(NSString *)string; //returns the string object
-(void)setString:(NSString *)string;

So what it does is improve readability and helps reduce a lot of boiler plate code.

It's no longer necessary to define the instance variable inside the {} parenthesis now.

If you need to have the instance variable set to a different name you can put a

@synthesize string = _string;

Since you're new at this Ill add some bonus stuff for you to think about. self.string = @"string" May not be an equivalent call as string = @"string"

If you have @property (strong) NSString *string; and @synthesize string; The reason for this is setting the string via self.string is using the method implementation to set the string and may be overridden like this:

-(void)setString:(NSString *)str{
    string = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@.jpg", str];
}

So self.string = @"hello" would be @"hello.jpg" where as string = @"hello" is just "hello"

Also self.string = @"string"; is much the same as [self setString:@"string"];

For clarification on what @property(strong)NSString *string does inside the .h adds:

{
   NSString *_string;
}
-(void)setString:(NSString *)string;
-(NSString *)string;

inside .m:

-(void)setString:(NSString *)string{
_string = string;
}

-(NSString *)string{
return _string;
}

So there's no need to call @synthesize unless you want to rename the iVar into something else @synthesize string = wibblyWobblyTimeyWimey;

so in the .h it would be

{
NSString *wibblyWobblyTimeyWimey;
}

inside the .m

-(void)setString:(NSString *)string{
wibblyWobblyTimeyWimey = string;
}

-(NSString *)string {
return wibblyWobblyTimeyWimey;
}
  • So, as I understand self.string will call overriden method, and just string will call default? And also one question: do I need synthesise properties or not? – Shyngys Kassymov Sep 1 '13 at 12:32
  • Added some clarification to explain what happens with @synth and why you don't necessarily need to add it in anymore, since it kinda does it automatically with _varname. Its also pretty amazing that one line of code does so much, it oft feels magical and its why its so hard to grasp when looking at the code. – David Wong Sep 1 '13 at 12:47

If you're using Xcode 4.6.x, and you've installed the command-line tools with Clang 4 or higher, you can take advantage of 'auto-synthesized' properties.

@interface Photo : NSObject

@property (retain) NSString* caption;
@property (retain) NSString* photographer;

@end

Will give you the instance variables _caption and _photographer. So no, you really don't need to declare instance variables in most cases. If you're using ARC, it would only make sense to use properties.

Here is what that code should look like if you're using ARC:

@interface Photo : NSObject

@property (strong) NSString* caption;
@property (strong) NSString* photographer;

@end

Also, generally it's a good idea to specify the nonatomic attribute. Not doing so will mean that the accessors that clang will generate will be using locks:

@interface Photo : NSObject

@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString* caption;
@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString* photographer;

@end
  • Ok, thanks, and what about certain cases, as said n00bProgrammer, are there any special moments, when I need both of them? Or it will use allready auto create variables _caption and _photographer? – Shyngys Kassymov Sep 1 '13 at 12:09
  • @Chika properties in the .h are exposed publically. If you want to have a private or internal property, do this in the implementation(.m): (at)implementation Photo { (at)property (strong, nonatomic) NSString *date; } – maz Sep 3 '13 at 18:34

No you do not. The variable in the {} are private members, not accessible to classes that inherit this header file, whereas properties can be access, read, and written, by inheriting classes.

But this is not always the case. In certain cases, (like delegates), both are required.

  • Thanks, for clear answer. As I know delegate is needed to relationship two classes? Pleaese, explain also when we use 'delegate' (for what purposes), to understand more clearly. – Shyngys Kassymov Sep 1 '13 at 12:05
  • This is not necessarily true. Property can be used as a private method by using @interface objectName () inside the .m file above the implementation. – David Wong Sep 1 '13 at 12:19
  • You're better off asking about delegates in a different question or looking it up in google, its a pretty big broad topic. – David Wong Sep 1 '13 at 12:49
  • @David Wong, you are absolutely right. It depends upon whether the interfaces and implementations are defined in the header or man file. I only explained it in a layman's terms, making an assumption, the code is in the header file (wrong on my part). But I believe it's the duty of the reader to go through Apple's documentation prior to posting questions on SO. :) – n00bProgrammer Sep 1 '13 at 13:38

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