39

Is it possible to create a mock object with disabled constructor and manually setted protected properties?

Here is an idiotic example:

class A {
    protected $p;
    public function __construct(){
        $this->p = 1;
    }

    public function blah(){
        if ($this->p == 2)
            throw Exception();
    }
}

class ATest extend bla_TestCase {
    /** 
        @expectedException Exception
    */
    public function testBlahShouldThrowExceptionBy2PValue(){
        $mockA = $this->getMockBuilder('A')
            ->disableOriginalConstructor()
            ->getMock();
        $mockA->p=2; //this won't work because p is protected, how to inject the p value?
        $mockA->blah();
    }
}

So I wanna inject the p value which is protected, so I can't. Should I define setter or IoC, or I can do this with phpunit?

  • 1
    Just for the record - if you are testing non-public API, then you are doing it wrong. Unit testing is about testing behaviour, not internal implementation. – emix Jun 24 '15 at 11:02
51

You can make the property public by using Reflection, and then set the desired value:

$a = new A;
$reflection = new ReflectionClass($a);
$reflection_property = $reflection->getProperty('p');
$reflection_property->setAccessible(true);

$reflection_property->setValue($a, 2);

Anyway in your example you don't need to set p value for the Exception to be raised. You are using a mock for being able to take control over the object behaviour, without taking into account it's internals.

So, instead of setting p = 2 so an Exception is raised, you configure the mock to raise an Exception when the blah method is called:

$mockA = $this->getMockBuilder('A')
        ->disableOriginalConstructor()
        ->getMock();
$mockA->expects($this->any())
         ->method('blah')
         ->will($this->throwException(new Exception));

Last, it's strange that you're mocking the A class in the ATest. You usually mock the dependencies needed by the object you're testing.

Hope this helps.

  • 1
    Class A is not fully dependency injected, I create new instance of several classes in it's constructor... So I need to override the constructor to mock out those instances. Not the best approach, I think I'll use dependency injection container instead of this. – inf3rno Sep 2 '13 at 16:11
  • your code will be definitely more testable. There are several choices for implementing DI, but this is a really simple one: pimple.sensiolabs.org – gontrollez Sep 2 '13 at 19:44
  • 3
    Don't use the dependency injection container in the test! A good unit test only tests one class, and ALL dependencies are injected as fully configured mocks. If you cannot do this, you have a bad architecture which should be improved. – Sven Sep 2 '13 at 22:20
  • 1
    instead of $a->p = 2;, I had to use $reflection_property->setValue($a, 2), because first approach returned error Fatal error: Cannot access protected property Store_Api_Version_2_Resource_Products::$_fields in ... – petrkotek Dec 16 '13 at 0:16
19

Thought i'd leave a handy helper method that could be quickly copy and pasted here:

/**
 * Sets a protected property on a given object via reflection
 *
 * @param $object - instance in which protected value is being modified
 * @param $property - property on instance being modified
 * @param $value - new value of the property being modified
 *
 * @return void
 */
public function setProtectedProperty($object, $property, $value)
{
    $reflection = new ReflectionClass($object);
    $reflection_property = $reflection->getProperty($property);
    $reflection_property->setAccessible(true);
    $reflection_property->setValue($object, $value);
}
0

It would be amazing if every codebase used DI and IoC, and never did stuff like this:

public function __construct(BlahClass $blah)
{
    $this->protectedProperty = new FooClass($blah);
}

You can use a mock BlahClass in the constructor, sure, but then the constructor sets a protected property to something you CAN'T mock.

So you're probably thinking "Well refactor the constructor to take a FooClass instead of a BlahClass, then you don't have to instantiate the FooClass in the constructor, and you can put in a mock instead!" Well, you'd be right, if that didn't mean you would have to change every usage of the class in the entire codebase to give it a FooClass instead of a BlahClass.

Not every codebase is perfect, and sometimes you just need to get stuff done. And that means, yes, sometimes you need to break the "only test public APIs" rule.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.