I was reviewing UiKit, a frontend framework built with LESS, and noticed a rather interesting feature: hooks. Look at the following in the base framework:

.uk-panel-badge {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    z-index: 1;
    .hook-panel-badge;
}

.hook-panel-badge() {}

If you want to override that in a theme let's say you are building outside of the core files (files that come later in compilation), then you would do the following:

.hook-panel-badge() {
    right:auto;
}

So, in essence it looks like you are able to override/customize selectors without adding in additional selectors, so it keeps your markup as small as possible.

Is anything like this available in SASS? This looks like an awesome feature that I'd love to use as a primarily SASS user, but I haven't found @extend to be the same. Thanks!

Update

The placeholder feature seems to be the closest thing I've found:

.panel {
    background:red;
    @extend %hook-panel;
}

%hook-panel {
    color:blue;
}

Which renders as:

.panel {
  background: red; }

.panel {
  color: blue; }

and can be defined after (which is awesome), but this still duplicates the selector. Is there anyway to only render the value of the placeholder in the original selector it is included in?

  • If you define a load of properties in a SASS class then at the bottom of that class use @extend hook-class do the conflicting hook-class properties get overwritten even though they are (sort of) declared afterwards? I assume so given you mentioned @extend in your question... – Ed Hinchliffe Sep 1 '13 at 21:25
  • The problem I've seen with doing something like what you're saying is I'm still getting duplicate selectors: example – Zach Sep 2 '13 at 0:17
  • I see what you mean. So SASS behaviour is to preserve the original class, but LESS destroys it. The markup would be the same though - in the example you gave, using the class uk-panel-badge would produce a blue background. The only difference is that the CSS files for the SASS version would be marginally bigger (we're talking a very small difference). – Ed Hinchliffe Sep 2 '13 at 10:24
  • 1
    Have you seen that getUikit provides the .scss files and a uikit-mixin.scss that needs to be included before as you suggest in your blog article? If I take the case of the class .uk-alert it has a @include hook-alert(); If you use the mixin file it will then compile in only one css class with your mixin modification. – Samuel Oct 14 '15 at 15:29

SASS has a similar facility called mixins:

// Define the mixin
@mixin large-text
    font-family: Arial
    color: #ff0000

// Use it 
.page-title
    @include large-text
    padding: 10px


// Compiled CSS
.page-title {
    font-family: Arial;
    color: #ff0000;
    padding: 10px;
}

The beauty of mix-ins is that they can take arguments, so you don't need to override commonly-changed selectors:

// Define
@mixin sexy-border($color, $width)
    border-color: $color
    border-width: $width
    border-style: dashed


// Paragraphs in general will have a sexy blue 10px dashed border
p
    @include sexy-border(blue, 10px)


// Paragraphs of class "plain" will have a plain old black 1px solid border
p.plain
    @include sexy-border(black, 1px)
    border-style: solid


// Compiled CSS
p {
    border-color: blue;
    border-width: 10px;
    border-style: dashed;
}
p.plain {
    border-color: black;
    border-width: 1px;
    border-style: solid;
}

SASS mixin documentation.

  • Hi, thanks for the answer. I am fully aware of mixins (sorry for not clarifying that), but they don't seem to act the same as what LESS has done. In the LESS example it is included before it is declared almost as a "if this exists do this" which makes it a pretty easy pluggable area while mixins are declared before and unlike what LESS had, cannot be called twice (see how the LESS example has a starting .hook() {} below the initial inclusion)? – Zach Sep 1 '13 at 21:01
  • I'm not a LESS wiz, so I didn't understand the nuances of what you were after. Yes, mixins do have to be declared in advance, but what do you mean by "[mixins] cannot be called twice" - isn't that the whole point to make them reusable? – Arman H Sep 1 '13 at 21:11
  • I mean the 'declaration' of a mixin, but that's not going to effect that part since they need to be declared in advance. Definitely odd to come across a part of LESS that trumps SASS (if this were the workflow you were after) – Zach Sep 1 '13 at 21:16
  • Can't help you much further there, I don't believe SASS has that kind of functionality, but... Are you using SASS with WordPress? Check out Wordless - a SASS-driven environment for developing WP themes. It will streamline your process and it deals nicely with many headaches associated with moving back and forth between SASS and WP. – Arman H Sep 1 '13 at 21:29
  • @Zach Using a parametric mixin with defaul values does exactly this. – steveax Sep 2 '13 at 4:47

As far as I can see, there's no exact mapping of the LESS behaviour to a SASS equivalent.

You have the following options:

  1. @extend

    .uk-panel-badge {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        z-index: 1;
        @extend .hook-panel-badge;
    }
    
    .hook-panel-badge{
        right:auto;
    }
    

    Resulting in:

    .uk-panel-badge {
          position: absolute;
          top: 0;
          right: 0;
          z-index: 1; 
    }
    
    .hook-panel-badge, .uk-panel-badge {
          right: auto; 
    }
    

    This produces slightly more CSS than the LESS equivalent does, because the original (unhooked) class is preserved.

  2. @mixin

    //theme.scss:
    
    @mixin hook-panel-badge(){
    }
    
    @import "hooks";
    
    .uk-panel-badge {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        z-index: 1;
        @include hook-panel-badge;
    }
    
    _hooks.scss:
    
    //theme creator can override hooks in here.
    
    @mixin hook-panel-badge(){
        right:auto;
    }
    

    This creates the exact same code as your SASS, but the downside is that you need to define a blank mixin for every hookable class, which is a bit of effort. (You could of course put these all in the _hooks.scss file, but that would make the override code harder to read.

EDIT: I guess there is one more option as below, which saves a little bit of typing on the extendee's side, but moves away from standard CSS syntax for the extender a bit too much for my liking. You could of course use a partial file as in 2.

@mixin hook($class){
    //generic override.
    @if($class == "uk-panel-badge"){
        right:auto;
    }

    @else if($class== "selector2"){
        //override other classes in this way.
    }

}

.uk-panel-badge {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    z-index: 1;
    @include hook("uk-panel-badge");
}

Overall I still feel 1 is the best approach.

  • Really appreciate the different options here -- so it seems like the key difference here is that of inheritance (that I'd need to specify my overrides before the actual inclusion of the mixin, not after as LESS does). I wrote an article about it last night and even with example #2, that still requires the hooks to be separated from original markup, so I'm not sure if that one does work (it doesn't go full circle to find anything that overrides the original mixin before setting a value). Thanks again. – Zach Sep 2 '13 at 12:57

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