1

If I have a class, and the type of its data may be int, float, double, char[], std::string, std::vector ... Now I'm using an enum to indicate which type the data is and a void* to dynamically allocate memory for the data. However, I'm sure there must be a much more elegant way. How to implement it without using boost?

  • Emulate boost::variant. – GManNickG Sep 2 '13 at 5:18
  • Also look at union. It will allow you to access pointers with the right type without cast, and also allow you to store small types like int directly. – hyde Sep 2 '13 at 5:21
  • You may want to use OO features of C++. – n.m. Sep 2 '13 at 5:37
  • @n.m. Yes, but I don't know what to do. – Ggicci Sep 2 '13 at 5:38
  • @n.m. The OO features are probably only suitable if he needs to abstract the data-types away behind an interface. If he needs to expose the data-types directly, I don't see how that helps. – goji Sep 2 '13 at 5:43
5

Implement a "Variant" or "Any" type, as other have pointed out there are some implementations you can use already. But you can implement a simple version of your own if you dont want to use boost or other alternatives.

You will need 2 structures for your types, a base class which will be the one you store, and a derived template class which will hold the actual object.

Lets call them Placeholder and Holder:

This is the base structure:

/**
 * @brief The place holder structure..
 */
struct PlaceHolder
{
  /**
   * @brief Finalizes and instance of the PlaceHolder class.
   */
    virtual ~PlaceHolder() {}

    /**
     * @brief Gets the type of the underlying value.
     */
    virtual const std::type_info& getType() const = 0;

    /**
     * @brief Clones the holder.
     */
    virtual PlaceHolder * clone() const = 0;
};

And this will be the derived class:

template<typename ValueType>
struct Holder: public PlaceHolder
{

    /**
     * @brief Initializes a new instance of the Holder class.
     *
     * @param ValueType The value to be holded.
     */
    Holder(const ValueType & value) : held(value) {}

    /**
     * @brief Gets the type of the underlying value.
     */
    virtual const std::type_info & getType() const
    {
      return typeid(ValueType);
    }

    /**
     * @brief Clones the holder.
     */
    virtual PlaceHolder * clone() const
    {
      return new Holder(held);
    }

    ValueType held;
};

Now we can this:

PlaceHolder* any = new Holder<int>(3);

And we can get the value back from it like this:

int number = static_cast<Holder<int> *>(any)->held;

This is not very practical, so we create a class that will handle all this stuff for us, and add some comodities to it, lets call it Any:

/**
 * @brief This data type can be used to represent any other data type (for example, integer, floating-point,
 * single- and double-precision, user defined types, etc.).
 *
 * While the use of not explicitly declared variants such as this is not recommended, they can be of use when the needed
 * data type can only be known at runtime, when the data type is expected to vary, or when optional parameters
 * and parameter arrays are desired.
 */
class Any
{
  public:

    /**
     * @brief Initializes a new instance of the Any class.
     */
    Any()
    : m_content(0)
    {
    }

    /**
     * @brief Initializes a new instance of the Any class.
     *
     * @param value The value to be holded.
     */
    template<typename ValueType>
    Any(const ValueType & value)
    : m_content(new Holder<ValueType>(value))
    {
    }

    /**
     * @brief Initializes a new instance of the Any class.
     *
     * @param other The Any object to copy.
     */
    Any(const Any & other)
    : m_content(other.m_content ? other.m_content->clone() : 0)
    {
    }

    /**
     * @brief Finalizes and instance of the Any class.
     */
    virtual ~Any()
    {
      delete m_content;
    }

    /**
     * @brief Exchange values of two objects.
     *
     * @param rhs The Any object to be swapped with.
     *
     * @return A reference to this.
     */
    Any& swap(Any & rhs)
    {
      std::swap(m_content, rhs.m_content);

      return *this;
    }

    /**
     * @brief The assignment operator.
     *
     * @param rhs The value to be assigned.
     *
     * @return A reference to this.
     */
    template<typename ValueType>
    Any& operator=(const ValueType & rhs)
    {
      Any(rhs).swap(*this);
      return *this;
    }

    /**
     * @brief The assignment operator.
     *
     * @param rhs The value to be assigned.
     *
     * @return A reference to this.
     */
    Any & operator=(const Any & rhs)
    {
      Any(rhs).swap(*this);

      return *this;
    }

    /**
     * @brief The () operator.
     *
     * @return The holded value.
     */
    template<typename ValueType>
    ValueType operator()() const
    {
      if (!m_content)
      {
        //TODO: throw
      }
      else if (getType() == typeid(ValueType))
      {
        return static_cast<Any::Holder<ValueType> *>(m_content)->held;
      }
      else
      {
        //TODO: throw
      }
   }

    /**
     * @brief Gets the underlying value.
     *
     * @return The holded value.
     */
    template<typename ValueType>
    ValueType get(void) const
    {
      if (!m_content)
      {
        //TODO: throw
      }
      else if (getType() == typeid(ValueType))
      {
        return static_cast<Any::Holder<ValueType> *>(m_content)->held;
      }
      else
      {
        //TODO:  throw
      }
    }   

    /**
     * @brief Tells whether the holder is empty or not.
     *
     * @return <tt>true</tt> if the holder is empty; otherwise <tt>false</tt>.
     */
    bool isEmpty() const;
    {
      return !m_content;
    }

    /**
     * @brief Gets the type of the underlying value.
     */
    const std::type_info& getType() const;
    {
      return m_content ? m_content->getType() : typeid(void);
    }

  protected:

    /**
     * @brief The place holder structure..
     */
    struct PlaceHolder
    {
      /**
       * @brief Finalizes and instance of the PlaceHolder class.
       */
        virtual ~PlaceHolder() {}

        /**
         * @brief Gets the type of the underlying value.
         */
        virtual const std::type_info& getType() const = 0;

        /**
         * @brief Clones the holder.
         */
        virtual PlaceHolder * clone() const = 0;
    };

    template<typename ValueType>
    struct Holder: public PlaceHolder
    {

        /**
         * @brief Initializes a new instance of the Holder class.
         *
         * @param ValueType The value to be holded.
         */
        Holder(const ValueType & value) : held(value) {}

        /**
         * @brief Gets the type of the underlying value.
         */
        virtual const std::type_info & getType() const
        {
          return typeid(ValueType);
        }

        /**
         * @brief Clones the holder.
         */
        virtual PlaceHolder * clone() const
        {
          return new Holder(held);
        }

        ValueType held;
    };

  protected:

    PlaceHolder* m_content;
};

This implementation is based on the Any of Ogre

you can use it for example like this:

int main()
{
  Any three = 3;

  int number = three.get<int>();

  cout << number << "\n";

  three = string("Three");

  std::string word = three.get<string>();

  cout << word << "\n";

  return 0;
}

output:

3
Three
2

If there is a finite list of types, consider the visitor pattern. It is designed for when you have a small set of types, but many algorithms which wish to operate on the data. You often see it in 3d graphics scene graphs. It lets you effectively dynamic_cast a node to any type, but only requires a pair of virtual calls to do it, rather than a large number of dynamic_casts.

class Visitor;
class IntNode;
class FloatNode;

class Node {
    public:
        virtual void accept(Visitor& inVisitor) = 0;
};

class Visitor {
    public:
        virtual void visit(IntNode& inNode) = 0;
        virtual void visit(FloatNode& inNode) = 0;
};

class IntNode {
    public:
        virtual void accept(Visitor& inVisitor)    { return inVisitor->visit(this); }

        int& value()                               { return mValue;                 }
    private:
        int   mValue;
}

class FloatNode {
    public:
        virtual void accept(Visitor& inVisitor)    { return inVisitor->visit(this); }

        float& value()                             { return mValue;                 }
    private:
        float  mValue;
}

The idea is that you build an algorithm as a Visitor, and pass that algorithm to the Nodes. Each Node type's accept function "knows" the type of the node, so it can call the visitor's function for that particular type. Now the visitor knows the type of the node, and can do special processing for it.

As am example, consider copying a node, done both using your initial way and then done using the new Visitor pattern

OldNode*   copyNodeOldWayWithEnums(OldNode* inNode)
{
    switch(inNode->type) {
        case INT_TYPE:
        {
            int* oldValue = static_cast<int*>(inNode->value);
            OldNode* rval = new OldNode;
            rval->type = INT_TYPE;
            rval->value = new int(oldValue);
            return rval;
        }
        case FLOAT_TYPE:
        {
            float* oldValue = static_cast<float*>(inNode->value);
            OldNode* rval = new OldNode;
            rval->type = FLOAT_TYPE;
            rval->value = new float(oldValue);
            return rval;
        }
        case:
            throw std::runtime_error("Someone added a new type, but the copy algorithm didn't get updated");
    }
}

class CopyVisitor
: public Visitor
{
    public:
        virtual visitor(IntNode& inNode) {
            int value = inNode.value();
            mResult = new IntNode(value);
        }

        virtual visitor(FloatNode& inNode) {
            float value = inNode.value();
            mResult = new FloatNode(value);
        }

        Node*  mResult;
}

Node* copyNode(Node* inNode) {
    CopyVisitor v;
    inNode->accept(v);
    return v.mResult;
}

Traits of the visitor pattern

  • It is not immediately intuitive. Of the design patterns that appear in the Gang of Four's design patterns (the definitive book of Object Oriented Designs), it is by FAR the most difficult to understand. Yes, that is a disadvantage... but it can be worth it none the less
  • It is very typesafe. There are no unreliable static_casts or expensive dynamic_casts
  • Adding a type is very time consuming, so make sure you know the node types before writing a lot of visitors. However, if you do add a type, you immediately get compiler errors until all of your visitors are updated. The enum method you were using doesn't give you a compiler error -- you have to wait for a runtime error, which is much harder to find.
  • The Visitor pattern is TERRIBLY efficient at handling tree structures. This is why 3d scene graphs use it. If you find yourself using things like std::vector<Node*>, you'll find this pattern is very effective
  • The Node destructor is naturally virtual. This means you can do something like "delete mNode", and have it release memory safely. You don't have to put a switch in your destructor to figure out the real type behind the void* and delete it correctly.
  • Works best when there is a small number of node types, and a large number of algorithms.
  • Does a very good job of aggregating algorithm code in one place (in a Visitor), instead of distributing it across the nodes.

Now, all of this assumes you have a small list of node types. Visitor is designed for 5-20 types. If you want to store anything and everything in your node structure, boost::any is such a good solution that you should just take the time to install boost and use it. You will not beat it.

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