175

Does anyone know the full list of characters that can be used within a GET without being encoded? At the moment I am using A-Z a-z and 0-9... but I am looking to find out the full list.

I am also interested into if there is a specification released for the up coming addition of Chinese, Arabic url's (as obviously that will have a big impact on my question)

  • 5
    The characters allowed in a URI are either reserved !*'();:@&=+$,/?#[] or unreserved A-Za-z0-9_.~- (or a percent character % as part of a percent-encoding) – Mikl May 30 '16 at 16:42
  • 1
    In MySQL i use this REGEXP '[^]A-Za-z0-9_.~!*''();:@&=+$,/?#[%-]+' to find URL string with bad characters. Maybe it’s useful for someone else, too. – Mikl May 30 '16 at 16:47
165

From RFC 1738 specification:

Thus, only alphanumerics, the special characters "$-_.+!*'(),", and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL.

EDIT: As @Jukka K. Korpela correctly points out, this RFC was updated by RFC 3986. This has expanded and clarified the characters valid for host, unfortunately it's not easily copied and pasted, but I'll do my best.

In first matched order:

host        = IP-literal / IPv4address / reg-name

IP-literal  = "[" ( IPv6address / IPvFuture  ) "]"

IPvFuture   = "v" 1*HEXDIG "." 1*( unreserved / sub-delims / ":" )

IPv6address =         6( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  /                       "::" 5( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [               h16 ] "::" 4( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *1( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 3( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *2( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 2( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *3( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"    h16 ":"   ls32
                  / [ *4( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              ls32
                  / [ *5( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              h16
                  / [ *6( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"

ls32        = ( h16 ":" h16 ) / IPv4address
                  ; least-significant 32 bits of address

h16         = 1*4HEXDIG 
               ; 16 bits of address represented in hexadecimal

IPv4address = dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet

dec-octet   = DIGIT                 ; 0-9
              / %x31-39 DIGIT         ; 10-99
              / "1" 2DIGIT            ; 100-199
              / "2" %x30-34 DIGIT     ; 200-249
              / "25" %x30-35          ; 250-255

reg-name    = *( unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims )

unreserved  = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"     <---This seems like a practical shortcut, most closely resembling original answer

reserved    = gen-delims / sub-delims

gen-delims  = ":" / "/" / "?" / "#" / "[" / "]" / "@"

sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
              / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

pct-encoded = "%" HEXDIG HEXDIG
  • 5
    @Tim slash is a reserved character, therefore, if it is being used for its reserved purpose (delineating paths, protocol delineation...), then it does not need escaping. Otherwise, it does. – Myles Jul 6 '12 at 22:26
  • 4
    Generic syntax rules of RFC 1738 were obsoleted in 1998. – Jukka K. Korpela Mar 8 '13 at 7:17
  • 3
    @Myles, STD 66 (= RFC 3986) is mentioned in other answers. Whether the content of answers is correct is a different issue; I don’t think any of the answers correctly describes the full list. – Jukka K. Korpela Mar 8 '13 at 15:05
  • 4
    And you can add list of unreserved A-Za-z0-9_.-~ and reserved characters in the beginning of this answer. !*'();:@&=+$,/?#[] It can save time for people – Mikl May 30 '16 at 16:20
  • 2
    @basZero I'm sorry you found it confusing, but the full answer is not simple. The answer to your question is no, as it is a reserved character as stated by : reserved = gen-delims / sub-delims gen-delims = ":" / "/" / "?" / "#" / "[" / "]" / "@" – Myles Aug 31 '16 at 22:13
41

The characters allowed in a URI are either reserved or unreserved (or a percent character as part of a percent-encoding)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percent-encoding#Types_of_URI_characters

says these are RFC 3986 unreserved characters (sec. 2.3) as well as reserved characters (sec 2.2) if they need to retain their special meaning. And also a percent character as part of a percent-encoding.

  • 7
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – j.a.estevan May 15 '14 at 18:40
  • @j.a.estevan Citation from the linked document: The characters allowed in a URI are either reserved or unreserved (or a percent character as part of a percent-encoding) – Mikl May 30 '16 at 16:05
20

The full list of the 66 unreserved characters is in RFC3986, here: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-2.3

This is any character in the following regex set:

[A-Za-z0-9_.\-~]
  • 2
    You can use those reserved too. – Qwerty Mar 21 '13 at 11:53
  • The obsolete RFC1738 listed {}^\~ and backtick as unsafe. And RFC3986 lists \ as unsafe because of the file system. This means {}^ could be used as well. – mgutt Feb 16 '17 at 15:22
  • So if you're trying to, say, find the end of a url within a string (which I am), it would be best to go by the obsolete standards in the accepted answer... If you're validating url's you should use the set of characters on this answer. – ashleedawg Jul 14 '18 at 10:17
  • Careful, you've written this as a regular expression character class. Make sure to escape the - or put it at the beginning or end of the character class, because [.-~] actually contains all ASCII characters from 46 to 126. – kwl Jan 24 at 7:25
13

I tested it by requesting my website (apache) with all available chars on my german keyboard as URL parameter:

http://example.com/?^1234567890ß´qwertzuiopü+asdfghjklöä#<yxcvbnm,.-°!"§$%&/()=? `QWERTZUIOPÜ*ASDFGHJKLÖÄ\'>YXCVBNM;:_²³{[]}\|µ@€~

These were not encoded:

^0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ,.-!/()=?`*;:_{}[]\|~

Not encoded after urlencode():

0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ.-_

Not encoded after rawurlencode():

0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ.-_~

Note: Before PHP 5.3.0 rawurlencode() encoded ~ because of RFC 1738. But this was replaced by RFC 3986 so its safe to use, now. But I do not understand why for example {} are encoded through rawurlencode() because they are not mentioned in RFC 3986.

An additional test I made was regarding auto-linking in mail texts. I tested Mozilla Thunderbird, aol.com, outlook.com, gmail.com, gmx.de and yahoo.de and they fully linked URLs containing these chars:

0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ.-_~+#,%&=*;:@

Of course the ? was linked, too, but only if it was used once.

Some people would now suggest to use only the rawurlencode() chars, but did you ever hear that someone had problems to open these websites?

Asterisk
http://wayback.archive.org/web/*/http://google.com

Colon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:About

Plus
https://plus.google.com/+google

At sign, Colon, Comma and Exclamation mark
https://www.google.com/maps/place/USA/@36.2218457,...

Because of that these chars should be usable unencoded without problems. Of course you should not use &; because of encoding sequences like &amp;. The same reason is valid for % as it used to encode chars in general. And = as it assigns a value to a parameter name.

Finally I would say its ok to use these unencoded:

0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ.-_~!+,*:@

But if you expect randomly generated URLs you should not use .!, because those mark the end of a sentence and some mail apps will not auto-link the last char of the url. Example:

Visit http://example.com/foo=bar! !
  • Practical approach - good job. Was looking for that last list of yours - the + sign especially :-D – Oliver Mar 22 at 15:59
12

From here

Thus, only alphanumerics, the special characters $-_.+!*'(), and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL.

7

These are listed in RFC3986. See the Collected ABNF for URI to see what is allowed where and the regex for parsing/validation.

3

The upcoming change is for chinese, arabic domain names not URIs. The internationalised URIs are called IRIs and are defined in RFC 3987. However, having said that I'd recommend not doing this yourself but relying on an existing, tested library since there are lots of choices of URI encoding/decoding and what are considered safe by specification, versus what are safe by actual use (browsers).

3

RFC3986 defines two sets of characters you can use in a URI:

  • Reserved Characters: :/?#[]@!$&'()*+,;=

    reserved = gen-delims / sub-delims

    gen-delims = ":" / "/" / "?" / "#" / "[" / "]" / "@"

    sub-delims = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")" / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

    The purpose of reserved characters is to provide a set of delimiting characters that are distinguishable from other data within a URI. URIs that differ in the replacement of a reserved character with its corresponding percent-encoded octet are not equivalent.

  • Unreserved Characters: A-Za-z0-9-_.~

    unreserved = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"

    Characters that are allowed in a URI but do not have a reserved purpose are called unreserved.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.