1

I need a function with certain probability that it will fire, something like:

function broken_fn ( function () { console.log( Math.random() ); }, 33 ) {
    // code...
}

for use in simple online game I'm working on...

4
  • can you tell me why you would need a function to have this ability? Also, I have a question for you - I've been reading thru some of your code. Commented Dec 22, 2013 at 23:34
  • ...for scheduling that function to run periodicaly and produce events in game I'm experimenting with. What's the question? Commented Dec 24, 2013 at 20:41
  • 1
    sorry to move the comments off track - I see you pass in a boatload of functions, methods etc.. via the () execution of the function. ala: (function(arg1){}(Alot_code_you_Pass)). And then the scope of your methods iin the function have access. I dig that. Why not just make alot of that code 'part' of the object. It's just a different coding style i've seen. Curious if there was a methodology behind it. Commented Dec 24, 2013 at 21:54
  • 1
    good question. that pattern enables having private stuff in JavaScript, safely encapsulated in closure, for use by public api. you can do with packaging all the code in object, which, in my point of view, unnecesary bloats public api with funcionality that is ment to be used internaly only. Commented Dec 24, 2013 at 23:58

3 Answers 3

10

How about:

function maybeFire (fn, probability) {
    if (Math.random() < probability) {
         fn();
    }
}    

Use it as:

maybeFire(function() { console.log('fired!'); }, .5);
3
  • 7
    Since when is code "too short"? The only thing is that it takes 0-1 not 0-100 but easy to adjust.
    – elclanrs
    Commented Sep 2, 2013 at 7:50
  • ... and you have to constantly pass a function to 'maybeFire' fn. Commented Sep 2, 2013 at 7:53
  • Then you can create a function that returns a function with a "maybe" attached to it. It's a matter of taking this code and getting creative.
    – elclanrs
    Commented Sep 2, 2013 at 8:13
0

Here's the way that won't fire the function right away, but you can call it repeatedly to maybe fire (didn't realize this was the intention):

function getMaybeFireFunction (fn, probability) {
    return function() {
        if (Math.random() < probability) {
             fn();
        }
    };
}    

Use:

var fn = getMaybeFireFunction(function() { console.log('hello'); }, .5);
fn();
fn();
2
  • handlig transfering args and context to returned fn would make it more usefull. Commented Sep 16, 2013 at 13:10
  • seeing an example of what you were looking for would make your comment more useful ;)
    – pfrank
    Commented Sep 16, 2013 at 18:28
-5
    function broken_fn( fn, will_fire_probability /* 0 - 100 */ ) {

        // #helpers
        function slc( args, i1, i2 ) {
            return Array.prototype.slice.call( args, i1, i2 );
        }

        function clumpnum( num, min, max, _default ) {
          return ( Object.prototype.toString.call( num ) === "[object Number]" )
                 ? (
                    ( isFinite( num ) )
                    ? ( ( ( num >= min ) && ( num <= max ) ) || ( num = _default ), num )
                    : _default
                   )
                 : _default;
        }

        function randint( min, max, un ) {
            var r;
            return  ( min === un && max === un ) && ( Math.random() ) ||
                    (
                     ( max === un ) &&
                        ( max = min, min = 0, r = min + Math.floor( Math.random() * (max - min + 1) ), true ) ||
                        ( r = min + Math.floor( Math.random() * ( max - min + 1 ) ) )
                    ) && r;
        }



        // code

        var
            pr    = clumpnum( will_fire_probability, 0, 100, 50 ),
            args1 = slc( arguments, 2 );

        return function () {
            var out;
            ( ( pr == 100 ) || ( randint( 0, 100 ) < pr ) )
            && ( out = fn.apply( this, args1.concat( slc( arguments ) ) ) );
            return out;
        }

    }


var
    f1 = broken_fn( function () { console.log( Math.random() ); }, 25 );

f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();
f1();

//
//  0.00948742698193461
//  0.3570269207216398
//  0.01068347242658918
//
// ...
//
1
  • 4
    Wow that's an overkill and a lot of code, check out my function
    – pfrank
    Commented Sep 2, 2013 at 7:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.