183

I'm trying to figure out the best way to get everything before the - character in a string. Some example strings are below. The length of the string before - varies and can be any length

223232-1.jpg
443-2.jpg
34443553-5.jpg

so I need the value that's from the start index of 0 to right before -. So the substrings would turn out to be 223232, 443, and 34443553

9 Answers 9

190

.Net Fiddle example

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("223232-1.jpg".GetUntilOrEmpty());
        Console.WriteLine("443-2.jpg".GetUntilOrEmpty());
        Console.WriteLine("34443553-5.jpg".GetUntilOrEmpty());

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

static class Helper
{
    public static string GetUntilOrEmpty(this string text, string stopAt = "-")
    {
        if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(text))
        {
            int charLocation = text.IndexOf(stopAt, StringComparison.Ordinal);

            if (charLocation > 0)
            {
                return text.Substring(0, charLocation);
            }
        }

        return String.Empty;
    }
}

Results:

223232
443
34443553
344

34
8
  • 2
    Please do them a favor and add error checking as well assuming he plans to make a function out of this :)
    – Josh
    Commented Dec 7, 2009 at 2:51
  • 17
    If you wanted a one-liner without losing proper "not found" checking then you could do something like this: string result = source.Substring(0, Math.Max(source.IndexOf('-'), 0))
    – LukeH
    Commented Dec 7, 2009 at 9:58
  • 2
    Instead of s.Substring(0, n) one can use s.Remove(n) when it is known (like here) that the length of the string s strictly exceeds n. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 12:45
  • 1
    @LukeH If IndexOf returns -1 in your example, then an empty string would be returned, wouldn't it?
    – crush
    Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 14:35
  • @crush: Yes. My example is simply a single-line equivalent of Fredou's answer, so it returns an empty string when no - character is found.
    – LukeH
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 0:08
181

Use the split function.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string s = "223232-1.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);
    s = "443-2.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);
    s = "34443553-5.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);

Console.ReadKey();
}

If your string doesn't have a - then you'll get the whole string.

11
  • 4
    And if you have more than one hyphen, you get multiple elements in your array. Commented Nov 12, 2012 at 15:48
  • 2
    Indeed, James, so this would only be a solution if you expected only a single hyphen. I suppose you could use Linq methods like skip and aggregate to get what you wanted, but then you've got more code than the methods that have been proposed already. It all depends on how much you know about the incoming data. Commented Nov 12, 2012 at 19:50
  • 8
    And a few years on, I have just realised that I was rather too quick to concede James's point. The question asks how to find the string before a certain character. Further instances of that character are thus irrelevant, and taking [0] would "just work". Of course, it still depends on how much we trust the incoming data. What if there's no '-' at all? Commented May 26, 2015 at 11:43
  • 1
    I think @JamesDunne point was that by splitting into an array, you're creating a bunch of unnecessary strings - unnecessary garbage.
    – crush
    Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 14:28
  • 3
    I wouldn't worry about "unnecessary garbage". Any extra strings created this way would be immediately unreachable and therefore collected in generation 0, which is an extremely low overhead indeed. The garbage collector design is explicitly intended to allow for large numbers of short-lived items to be used with almost no expense. Commented Oct 5, 2015 at 18:07
80
String str = "223232-1.jpg";
int index = str.IndexOf('-');
if(index > 0) {
    return str.Substring(0, index);
}
2
  • upvote because I need to know the index of the separator Commented Feb 29, 2016 at 8:02
  • 4
    This is actually the same answer as Fredou gave (currently the top answer) except that it omits handling the case where no match is found. Commented May 9, 2016 at 9:16
12

Things have moved on a bit since this thread started.

Now, you could use

string.Concat(s.TakeWhile((c) => c != '-'));
2
  • How does this compare performance wise to the obvious IndexOf and Substring combination? I assume it is appending each character to a StringBuilder, and then producing a string at the end. There's also a couple of function calls mixed in. Would've been nice if Substring could simply take -1 as a "length" argument meaning "end of string".
    – crush
    Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 14:23
  • 1
    It's worse for efficiency. As you say, it uses a string builder, and having inspected the code appears to call ToString on each character. It is clearer if you're looking for more than one character, as you could rewrite the lambda easily. Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 6:15
9

Slightly modified and refreshed Fredou's solution for C# ≥ 8

/// <summary>
/// Get substring until first occurrence of given character has been found. Returns the whole string if character has not been found.
/// </summary>
public static string GetUntil(this string that, char @char)
{
    return that[..(IndexOf() == -1 ? that.Length : IndexOf())];
    int IndexOf() => that.IndexOf(@char);
}

Tests:

[TestCase("", ' ', ExpectedResult = "")]
[TestCase("a", 'a', ExpectedResult = "")]
[TestCase("a", ' ', ExpectedResult = "a")]
[TestCase(" ", ' ', ExpectedResult = "")]
[TestCase("/", '/', ExpectedResult = "")]
[TestCase("223232-1.jpg", '-', ExpectedResult = "223232")]
[TestCase("443-2.jpg", '-', ExpectedResult = "443")]
[TestCase("34443553-5.jpg", '-', ExpectedResult = "34443553")]
[TestCase("34443553-5-6.jpg", '-', ExpectedResult = "34443553")]
public string GetUntil(string input, char until) => input.GetUntil(until);
8

One way to do this is to use String.Substring together with String.IndexOf:

int index = str.IndexOf('-');
string sub;
if (index >= 0)
{
    sub = str.Substring(0, index);
}
else
{
    sub = ... // handle strings without the dash
}

Starting at position 0, return all text up to, but not including, the dash.

2
  • if index <= 0 you should just return string.empty. Commented Dec 7, 2009 at 2:54
  • 6
    @NRNR: if you say so. The OP knows the business requirements, not you or I. Commented Dec 7, 2009 at 2:55
2

The LINQy way

String.Concat( "223232-1.jpg".TakeWhile(c => c != '-') )

(But, you do need to test for null ;)

1

Building on BrainCore's answer:

    int index = 0;   
    str = "223232-1.jpg";

    //Assuming we trust str isn't null 
    if (str.Contains('-') == "true")
    {
      int index = str.IndexOf('-');
    }

    if(index > 0) {
        return str.Substring(0, index);
    }
    else {
       return str;
    }
0

You can use regular expressions for this purpose, but it's good to avoid extra exceptions when input string mismatches against regular expression.

First to avoid extra headache of escaping to regex pattern - we could just use function for that purpose:

String reStrEnding = Regex.Escape("-");

I know that this does not do anything - as "-" is the same as Regex.Escape("=") == "=", but it will make difference for example if character is @"\".

Then we need to match from begging of the string to string ending, or alternately if ending is not found - then match nothing. (Empty string)

Regex re = new Regex("^(.*?)" + reStrEnding);

If your application is performance critical - then separate line for new Regex, if not - you can have everything in one line.

And finally match against string and extract matched pattern:

String matched = re.Match(str).Groups[1].ToString();

And after that you can either write separate function, like it was done in another answer, or write inline lambda function. I've wrote now using both notations - inline lambda function (does not allow default parameter) or separate function call.

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

static class Helper
{
    public static string GetUntilOrEmpty(this string text, string stopAt = "-")
    {
        return new Regex("^(.*?)" + Regex.Escape(stopAt)).Match(text).Groups[1].Value;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Regex re = new Regex("^(.*?)-");
        Func<String, String> untilSlash = (s) => { return re.Match(s).Groups[1].ToString(); };

        Console.WriteLine(untilSlash("223232-1.jpg"));
        Console.WriteLine(untilSlash("443-2.jpg"));
        Console.WriteLine(untilSlash("34443553-5.jpg"));
        Console.WriteLine(untilSlash("noEnding(will result in empty string)"));
        Console.WriteLine(untilSlash(""));
        // Throws exception: Console.WriteLine(untilSlash(null));

        Console.WriteLine("443-2.jpg".GetUntilOrEmpty());
    }
}

Btw - changing regex pattern to "^(.*?)(-|$)" will allow to pick up either until "-" pattern or if pattern was not found - pick up everything until end of string.

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