12

Does iterating over a dynamic array using for ... in ... do create a copy of the item in the array? For example:

type
  TSomeRecord =record
    SomeField1 :string;
    SomeField2 :string;
  end;

var
  list: array of TSomeRecord;
  item: TSomeRecord;

begin
  // Fill array here
  for item in list do
    begin
      // Is item here a copy of the item in the array or a reference to it?
    end;
end;

Will item in the loop be a copy of the item in the array or a reference to it?

If it is a copy is it possible to iterate over the array without a copy being created?

Thanks,

AJ

4
  • I would implement record pointers anyway for similar scenarios. Any time you want to pass records around and modify their contents in different places, a record pointer PSomeRecord works a lot more efficiently, and you don't have to worry about it being copied. Especially if it holds a lot of contents (a lot of memory). Sep 2 '13 at 18:47
  • 1
    @Jerry But now you have to manage lifetime explicitly Sep 2 '13 at 20:46
  • @David True, it's a big change in the way everything works, but like I said, if a single record consumes a large amount of memory, it's best to keep them in pointers. Sep 2 '13 at 20:50
  • I naturally tend to skip arrays and implement a TList which is easier to add/remove different items. Not saying it's better than arrays, which come in very handy in certain scenarios. I always write custom classes to encapsulate lists. It's just different developers' coding styles. Sep 2 '13 at 20:53
11

The loop variable of a for/in loop is a copy of the value held by the container over which the loop is iterating.

Since you cannot replace the default enumerator for dynamic arrays, there is no way for you to create an enumerator that returns references rather than copies. If you were to wrap up the array inside a record, you could create an enumerator for the record that would return references.

Obviously you can use a traditional indexed for loop if you wish to avoid making copies.


One might ask, since there appears to be no documentation of the above statement, why the compiler does not choose to implement such for/in loops using references rather than copies. Only the designers can answer that definitely, but I can offer a justification.

Consider a custom enumerator. The documentation describes the mechanism as follows:

To use the for-in loop construct on a class or interface, the class or interface must implement a prescribed collection pattern. A type that implements the collection pattern must have the following attributes:

  • The class or interface must contain a public instance method called GetEnumerator(). The GetEnumerator() method must return a class, interface, or record type.
  • The class, interface, or record returned by GetEnumerator() must contain a public instance method called MoveNext(). The MoveNext() method must return a Boolean. The for-in loop calls this method first to ensure that the container is not empty.
  • The class, interface, or record returned by GetEnumerator() must contain a public instance, read-only property called Current. The type of the Current property must be the type contained in the collection.

The custom enumerator returns each value from the collection via the Current property. And that implies that the value is copied.

So, this means that custom enumerators always use copies. Imagine if the built-in enumerator for arrays could use references. That would result in a significant semantic difference between the two types of enumerators. It's surely plausible that the designers opted for consistency between the semantics of difference types of enumerators

5
  • If a copy is made then why is it not possible to modify the copy? For example item.SomeField1 := 'Test' gives a compile error.
    – AJ.
    Sep 2 '13 at 15:20
  • 1
    Simply, the language definition decrees that loop variables cannot be modified. Sep 2 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    Probably exactly because this is a copy and changes to copy will not be saved in array
    – VitaliyG
    Sep 2 '13 at 15:21
  • Lets say you did it the old school way with for i:=0 to High(list) do instead, and then did list[i].SomeField := 'test'. Does this modify the original record in the list?
    – AJ.
    Sep 2 '13 at 15:24
  • 3
    @AJ. Certainly it does. list[i] IS the original record, in that case! Sep 2 '13 at 15:25
5

@David answered that the enumerator is a copy of the record.

He also said that wrapping a dynamic array inside a record would allow for a custom enumerator.

Here is an example of doing that:

program ProjectCustomEnumerator;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  PSomeRecord = ^TSomeRecord;
  TSomeRecord = record
    SomeField1 :string;
    SomeField2 :string;
  end;

  TSomeRecordArray = record
  private type
    TSomeRecordDynArray = array of TSomeRecord;
    // For x in .. enumerator
    TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator = record
        procedure Create( const AnArray : TSomeRecordDynArray);
      private
        FCurrent,FLast : Integer;
        FArray : TSomeRecordDynArray;
        function GetCurrent : PSomeRecord; inline;
      public
        function MoveNext : Boolean; inline;
        property Current : PSomeRecord read GetCurrent;
    end;
  public
    List : TSomeRecordDynArray;
    // Enumerator interface
    function GetEnumerator : TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator; inline;
  end;

procedure TSomeRecordArray.TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator.Create(
  const AnArray: TSomeRecordDynArray);
begin
  FCurrent := -1;
  FLast := Length(AnArray)-1;
  FArray := AnArray;
end;

function TSomeRecordArray.TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator.GetCurrent: PSomeRecord;
begin
  Result := @FArray[FCurrent];
end;

function TSomeRecordArray.TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator.MoveNext: Boolean;
begin
  Inc(FCurrent);
  Result := (FCurrent <= FLast);
end;

function TSomeRecordArray.GetEnumerator: TSomeRecordArrayEnumerator;
begin
  Result.Create(Self.List);
end;

var
  aList : TSomeRecordArray;
  item : PSomeRecord;
  i    : Integer;
begin
  // Fill array here
  SetLength(aList.List,2);
  aList.List[0].SomeField1 := 'Ix=0; Field1';
  aList.List[0].SomeField2 := 'Ix=0; Field2';
  aList.List[1].SomeField1 := 'Ix=1; Field1';
  aList.List[1].SomeField2 := 'Ix=1; Field2';
  i := -1;
  for item in aList do
  begin
    // Item here a pointer to the item in the array
    Inc(i);
    WriteLn('aList index:',i,' Field1:',item^.SomeField1,' Field2:',item^.SomeField2);
  end;
  ReadLn;
end.

Edit

Just to be complete and following up comments, here is a generic container example for any dynamic array of record, with a custom enumerator.

program ProjectCustomEnumerator;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  PSomeRecord = ^TSomeRecord;
  TSomeRecord = record
    SomeField1 :string;
    SomeField2 :string;
  end;

  TRecordArray<T> = record
  private type
    TRecordDynArray = array of T;
    // For x in .. enumerator
    TRecordArrayEnumerator = record
        procedure Initialize( const AnArray : TRecordDynArray);
      private
        FCurrent,FLast : Integer;
        FArray : TRecordDynArray;
        function GetCurrent : Pointer; inline;
      public
        function MoveNext : Boolean; inline;
        property Current : Pointer read GetCurrent;
    end;
  public
    List : TRecordDynArray;
    // Enumerator interface
    function GetEnumerator : TRecordArrayEnumerator; inline;
  end;

procedure TRecordArray<T>.TRecordArrayEnumerator.Initialize(
  const AnArray: TRecordDynArray);
begin
  FCurrent := -1;
  FLast := Length(AnArray)-1;
  FArray := AnArray;
end;

function TRecordArray<T>.TRecordArrayEnumerator.GetCurrent: Pointer;
begin
  Result := @FArray[FCurrent];
end;

function TRecordArray<T>.TRecordArrayEnumerator.MoveNext: Boolean;
begin
  Inc(FCurrent);
  Result := (FCurrent <= FLast);
end;

function TRecordArray<T>.GetEnumerator: TRecordArrayEnumerator;
begin
  Result.Initialize(Self.List);
end;

var
  aList : TRecordArray<TSomeRecord>;
  item : PSomeRecord;
  i    : Integer;
begin
  // Fill array here
  SetLength(aList.List,2);
  aList.List[0].SomeField1 := 'Ix=0; Field1';
  aList.List[0].SomeField2 := 'Ix=0; Field2';
  aList.List[1].SomeField1 := 'Ix=1; Field1';
  aList.List[1].SomeField2 := 'Ix=1; Field2';
  i := -1;
  for item in aList do
  begin
    // Item here a pointer to the item in the array
    Inc(i);
    WriteLn('aList index:',i,' Field1:',item^.SomeField1,' Field2:',item^.SomeField2);
  end;
  ReadLn;
end.
7
  • +1 Some comments. The entire record could be made generic and thus usable for any type. I also say that the use of Create for an instance method is confusing. Looks too much like a constructor. I'd have either class function called New that returned a new enumerator, or an instance method named Initialize. Sep 2 '13 at 21:28
  • @DavidHeffernan, making it generic, the enumerator would return a type PT = ^T;, but the loop item is declared as PSomeRecord. How to avoid the incompatible types error?
    – LU RD
    Sep 2 '13 at 22:30
  • Declaring the return type of GetCurrent as Pointer solves the incompatible types error. Not sure if that is the best solution though.
    – LU RD
    Sep 2 '13 at 22:50
  • If I recall correctly, in the generic record declare a type P = ^T and have the enumerator return items of type P. Then the look variable can be type ^TSomeRecord. Sep 3 '13 at 5:35
  • @DavidHeffernan, I tried that, but it gives incompatible types error.
    – LU RD
    Sep 3 '13 at 5:46

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