24

I have a function that takes a parameter and a callback. It's supposed to do a request to a remote API and get some info based on the parameter. When it gets the info, it needs to send it to the callback. Now, the remote API sometimes fails to provide. I need my function to keep trying until it manages to do it and then call the callback with the correct data.

Currently, I have the below code inside the function but I think that stuff like while (!done); isn't proper node code.

var history = {};
while (true) {
    var done = false;
    var retry = true;
    var req = https.request(options, function(res) {
        var acc = "";
        res.on("data", function(msg) {
            acc += msg.toString("utf-8");
        });
        res.on("end", function() {
            done = true;
            history = JSON.parse(acc);
            if (history.success) {
                retry = false;
            }
        });
    });
    req.end();
    while (!done);
    if (!retry) break;
}
callback(history);

How do I do it the right way?

24

Definitely not the way to go - while(!done); will go into a hard loop and take up all of your cpu.

Instead you could do something like this (untested and you may want to implement a back-off of some sort):

function tryUntilSuccess(options, callback) {
    var req = https.request(options, function(res) {
        var acc = "";
        res.on("data", function(msg) {
            acc += msg.toString("utf-8");
        });
        res.on("end", function() {
            var history = JSON.parse(acc);  //<== Protect this if you may not get JSON back
            if (history.success) {
                callback(null, history);
            } else {
                tryUntilSuccess(options, callback);
            }
        });
    });
    req.end();

    req.on('error', function(e) {
        // Decide what to do here
        // if error is recoverable
        //     tryUntilSuccess(options, callback);
        // else
        //     callback(e);
    });
}

// Use the standard callback pattern of err in first param, success in second
tryUntilSuccess(options, function(err, resp) {
    // Your code here...
});
  • 2
    I get how my loop is a bad idea but I have an extremely bad feeling about using recursion like that. What if it takes a 100 tries to get it? 100 calls that need to be exited after it finally succeeds doesn't seem like a good idea. I'm new to node so I'm probably wrong about this. – Luka Horvat Sep 2 '13 at 22:38
  • 1
    Remember there is an async call in the middle here. This isn't a recursive call - you won't have the stack building up. And yes - you may want to implement a counter as well to only retry 'n' times before giving up. – dc5 Sep 2 '13 at 22:39
  • 1
    Well yeah but the function can't just exit if it has an async call in it that's still waiting, can it? What if you closed over some of the local variables? They'd need to be kept alive. – Luka Horvat Sep 2 '13 at 22:41
  • 2
    Yes - it does. Any variables in the closure will still be there, but the function does exit. You can add some console.log(…) statements to get a better feel for what is happening. – dc5 Sep 2 '13 at 22:44
  • 1
    Ok then! Great! Thanks for explaining. – Luka Horvat Sep 2 '13 at 22:45
37

There is no need to re-invent the wheel... you can use a popular async utility library, 'retry' method in this case.

// try calling apiMethod 3 times
async.retry(3, apiMethod, function(err, result) {
    // do something with the result
});

// try calling apiMethod 3 times, waiting 200 ms between each retry
async.retry({times: 3, interval: 200}, apiMethod, function(err, result) {
    // do something with the result
});

async GitHub page

async.retry docs

  • 2
    If the wheel is square, then I'd argue that we better re-invent it. Have you tried using the above library? Just by reading the documentation I had no idea how in the world I was supposed to use the async.retry api because the documentation does give any concrete and comprehensive example(s) – Abimbola Esuruoso Mar 2 '16 at 10:55
  • 11
    @AbimbolaEsuruoso 26 millions downloads per month, they must be doing something right. And you can't be serious, the docs clearly state how you use that method including code example! Maybe you should just post a question about it, I would gladly give you an extra usage example. – Dmitry Matveev Mar 2 '16 at 19:45
  • Talking about examples: github.com/caolan/async/blob/master/lib/retry.js#L44 – zeroliu Jul 27 '17 at 18:01
7

I found Dmitry's answer using the async utility library very useful and the best answer.

This answer expands his example to a working version that defines the apiMethod function and passes it a parameter. I was going to add the code as a comment but a separate answer is clearer.

const async = require('async');

const apiMethod = function(uri, callback) {
  try {
    // Call your api here (or whatever thing you want to do) and assign to result.
    const result = ...
    callback(null, result);
  } catch (err) {
    callback(err);
  }
};

const uri = 'http://www.test.com/api';

async.retry(
    { times: 5, interval: 200 },
    function (callback) { return apiMethod(uri, callback) },
    function(err, result) {
      if (err) {
        throw err; // Error still thrown after retrying N times, so rethrow.
      }
  });

Retry documentation: https://caolan.github.io/async/docs.html#retry

Note, an alternative to calling apiMethod(uri, callback) in the task is to use async.apply:

async.retry(
        {times: 5, interval: 200},
        async.apply(task, dir),
        function(err, result) {
          if (err) {
            throw err; // Error still thrown after retrying N times, so rethrow.
          }
      });

I hope this provides a good copy/paste boiler plate solution for someone.

5

Is this what you are trying to do?

var history = {};

function sendRequest(options, callback) {
    var req = https.request(options, function (res) {
        var acc = "";
        res.on("data", function (msg) {
            acc += msg.toString("utf-8");
        });
        res.on("end", function () {
            history = JSON.parse(acc);
            if (history.success) {
                callback(history);
            }
            else {
                sendRequest(options, callback);
            }
        });
    });
    req.end();
}

sendRequest(options, callback);
3

I've solved this problem using the retry module.

Example:

var retry = require('retry');

// configuration
var operation = retry.operation({
  retries: 2,           // try 1 time and retry 2 times if needed, total = 3
  minTimeout: 1 * 1000, // the number of milliseconds before starting the first retry
  maxTimeout: 3 * 1000  // the maximum number of milliseconds between two retries
});

// your unreliable task
var task = function(input, callback) {

  Math.random() > 0.5
    ? callback(null, 'ok')   // success
    : callback(new Error()); // error
}

// define a function that wraps our unreliable task into a fault tolerant task
function faultTolerantTask(input, callback) {

  operation.attempt(function(currentAttempt) {

    task(input, function(err, result) {

      console.log('Current attempt: ' + currentAttempt);

      if (operation.retry(err)) {  // retry if needed
          return;
      }

      callback(err ? operation.mainError() : null, result);
    });
  });
}

// test
faultTolerantTask('some input', function(err, result) {
  console.log(err, result);
});
1

You could try something along the following lines. I'm writing a general idea, you should replace trySomething with your HTTP request.

function keepTrying(onSuccess) {
  function trySomething(onSuccess, onError) {
    if (Date.now() % 7 === 0) {
      process.nextTick(onSuccess);
    } else {
      process.nextTick(onError);
    }
  }
  trySomething(onSuccess, function () {
    console.log('Failed, retrying...');
    keepTrying(onSuccess);
  });
}

keepTrying(function () {
  console.log('Succeeded!');
});

I hope this helps.

1

A library called Flashheart is also a suitable alternative. It's a rest client designed to be easy to use and supports retries.

For example, configure Flashheart to retry 10 times, with a delay of 500ms between requests:

const client = require('flashheart').createClient({
  retries: 10,
  retryTimeout: 500
});

const url = "https://www.example.com/";
client.get(url, (err, body) => {
   if (err) {
      console.error('handle error: ', err);
      return;
   }
   console.log(body);
});

For further information, check out the docs: https://github.com/bbc/flashheart

Disclaimer: I have contributed to this library.

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