29

Is there any way I can check if a method is being called statically or on an instantiated object?

10 Answers 10

55

Try the following:

class Foo {
   function bar() {
      $static = !(isset($this) && get_class($this) == __CLASS__);
   }
}

Source: seancoates.com via Google

  • 1
    That's fairly paranoid.. but nice one nonetheless – K Prime Dec 7 '09 at 8:18
  • 7
    mmm ... this doesn't work, if i have a class 'baz' extending 'foo' and calling function 'bar' from baz' context, because __CLASS__ is still 'foo' and get_class($this) is 'baz'. – aurora Jul 20 '10 at 13:29
  • 2
    As @harald pointed out, this is not reliable. For example, I just found some production code that went something like this: $foo->anotherMethod() calls B::method() which called Foo::bar(). The original $foo variable was an instance of Foo. In this case, $this referred to the $foo instance. I have yet to find a solution to this problem other than to tread lightly and be careful with your code design. – bitsoflogic Jul 12 '12 at 13:33
  • 4
    Maybe do $this instanceof __CLASS__ instead of get_class($this) == __CLASS__? – neubert Sep 13 '15 at 14:23
  • 2
    @neubert $this instanceof self is working for me. $this instanceof __CLASS__ throws a fatal error (at least in PHP 5.3). – Adam Mazzarella Sep 21 '16 at 18:26
12

"Digging it out of debug_backtrace()" isn't too much work. debug_backtrace() had a 'type' member that is '::' if a call is static, and '->' if it is not. So:

class MyClass {
    public function doStuff() {
        if (self::_isStatic()) {
            // Do it in static context
        } else {
            // Do it in object context
        }
    }

    // This method needs to be declared static because it may be called
    // in static context.
    private static function _isStatic() {
        $backtrace = debug_backtrace();

        // The 0th call is to _isStatic(), so we need to check the next
        // call down the stack.
        return $backtrace[1]['type'] == '::';
    }
}

  • I added this method to my base class that all my classes extend from (although I made it public not private) and it works great :D – Scott Arciszewski Sep 5 '14 at 6:33
  • 3
    Are you sure? type holds the type of the function, which is either static or not; it doesn't change depending on the call protocol. – LSerni Nov 5 '14 at 16:31
  • This also works great when used in a Trait. I implemented the method isStatic(), which then obtains an instance of the class when true. – Amelia Sara Greene Jul 6 '16 at 0:15
  • For better performance, use: $backtrace = debug_backtrace(DEBUG_BACKTRACE_IGNORE_ARGS, 2); – Cédric Françoys Jan 11 '18 at 15:21
8

Checking if $this is set won't work always.

If you call a static method from within an object, then $this will be set as the callers context. If you really want the information, I think you'll have to dig it out of debug_backtrace. But why would you need that in the first place? Chances are you could change the structure of your code in a way so that you don't.

  • I forgot about that small annoyance. Interesting. – strager Dec 7 '09 at 8:56
  • Wouldn't BenTheDesigner's attempt tackle this issue? – Boldewyn Dec 7 '09 at 9:11
  • As long as $this isn't an instance of Foo, but I guess that's a bit contrived. Still, having to ask the question in the first place is a red flag to me. – troelskn Dec 7 '09 at 19:24
6

I actually use this line of code on all my scripts,it works well and it prevents errors.

class B{
      private $a=1;
      private static $static=2;

      function semi_static_function(){//remember,don't declare it static
        if(isset($this) && $this instanceof B)
               return $this->a;
        else 
             return self::$static;
      }
}

The use of instanceof is not paranoia:

If class A call class B statically function $this may exist on the A scope; I know it's pretty messed up but php does it.

instanceof will fix that and will avoid conflicting with classes that may implement your "semi-static" functions.

  • 1
    What do you mean by comment "remember,don't declare it static"? This simply won't work, if you have strict error reporting mode enabled (used mostly on final code, before production)! Because in this case you'll see notice/error saying: "Not-static methods should not be called statically". What you're proposing here seems to be as a little bit developer blah-blah. If you use function statically, you declare it with static keyword. Amen. No exception. – trejder Sep 19 '13 at 10:03
  • 1
    @trejder : statically declared methods cant use $this, whether called statically or not – Brad Kent Jul 27 '15 at 3:13
  • Please note that PHP 7 just deprecated calling non-static methods as static, will throw a deprecation warning. php.net/manual/en/migration70.deprecated.php In the future the feature may be removed altogether. – tacone Dec 16 '15 at 16:21
3

Test for $this:

class Foo {

    function bar() {
        if (isset($this)) {
            echo "Y";
        } else {
            echo "N";
        }
    }
}

$f = new Foo();
$f->bar(); // prints "Y"

Foo::bar(); // prints "N"

Edit: As pygorex1 points out, you can also force the method to be evaluated statically:

class Foo {

    static function bar() {
        if (isset($this)) {
            echo "Y";
        } else {
            echo "N";
        }
    }
}

$f = new Foo();
$f->bar(); // prints "N", not "Y"!

Foo::bar(); // prints "N"
  • 1
    +1 Interesting note: try changing function bar() to static function bar() - in this case $f->bar(), Foo::bar() and $f::bar() are all called in static context. – leepowers Dec 7 '09 at 8:21
  • Cool. I always thought it would raise an exception or so, if you'd try and call a static method from an instance. Thanks for pointing this out. – Boldewyn Dec 7 '09 at 8:25
  • 2
    ´$this` is also set if the method is called statically from within another object instance, so your solution is flawed. – cweiske Aug 29 '11 at 18:16
2

Testing isset($this) wasn't working for me, as mentioned by troelskn "$this will be set as the callers context."

abstract class parent
{
    function bar()
    {
        if( isset( $this ) ) do_something();
        else static::static_bar();
    }

    function static static_bar()
    {
        do_something_in_static_context();
    }
}

class child extends parent
{
    ...
}

$foo = new child();
$foo->bar(); //results in do_something()
child::bar(); //also results in do_something()

In my case, I have a parent class with a object and static context function that performs the same task within a child class. isset( $this ) was always returning true, however, I noticed that while $this switches between being class child in object context and calling(?) class on static context, the wonderful __class__ magic constant, remained as class parent!

Shortly there-after finding the function is_a, we can now test if we're in static context:

if(  is_a($this, __CLASS__) ) ...

Returns true on object context, false on static context.

Please test for your own implementations, as I'm only testing this for my specific scenario (a unique case of inheritance calling) in 5.3.

Unfortunately (for my case) I am yet unable to find a way to call the static_bar() since $this and static are referring to a separate class, and __class__ is referring to the parent class. What I need is a way to call child::static_bar()...

1

Check whether $this is defined

1
<?

class A {
    function test() {
            echo isset($this)?'not static':'static';                                }

}

$a = new A();
$a->test();
A::test();
?>

Edit: beaten to it.

1

This is an old question, but I'll add an alternative answer.

There are two magic methods

__call($name, $arguments)
is triggered when invoking inaccessible methods in an object context.

__callStatic($name, $arguments)
is triggered when invoking inaccessible methods in a static context.

<?php
class MethodTest
{
    public function __call($name, $arguments)
    {
        // Note: value of $name is case sensitive.
        echo "Calling object method '$name' "
             . implode(', ', $arguments). "\n";
    }

    /**  As of PHP 5.3.0  */
    public static function __callStatic($name, $arguments)
    {
        // Note: value of $name is case sensitive.
        echo "Calling static method '$name' "
             . implode(', ', $arguments). "\n";
    }
}

$obj = new MethodTest;
$obj->runTest('in object context');

MethodTest::runTest('in static context');  // As of PHP 5.3.0

Outputs

Calling object method 'runTest' in object context
Calling static method 'runTest' in static context

  • I really like this one, looks elegant and uses no workarounds. – Fractalizer Apr 6 '17 at 21:59
0

Just return the class as new within the function.

return new self();

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