77

Is there a way for me to subset data based on column names starting with a particular string? I have some columns which are like ABC_1 ABC_2 ABC_3 and some like XYZ_1, XYZ_2,XYZ_3 let's say.

How can I subset my df based only on columns containing the above portions of text (lets say, ABC or XYZ)? I can use indices, but the columns are too scattered in data and it becomes too much of hard coding.

Also, I want to only include rows from each of these columns where any of their value is >0 so if either of the 6 columns above has a 1 in the row, it makes a cut into my final data frame.

1
  • 1
    What language?! R? Add the relevant tag or no-one following R will see it. Please give a reproducible example, i.e. the structure of your dataframe, preferably dput( head( df ) ), or at the very least, str( df ). Sep 3, 2013 at 8:24

10 Answers 10

112

Try grepl on the names of your data.frame. grepl matches a regular expression to a target and returns TRUE if a match is found and FALSE otherwise. The function is vectorised so you can pass a vector of strings to match and you will get a vector of boolean values returned.

Example

#  Data
df <- data.frame( ABC_1 = runif(3),
            ABC_2 = runif(3),
            XYZ_1 = runif(3),
            XYZ_2 = runif(3) )

#      ABC_1     ABC_2     XYZ_1     XYZ_2
#1 0.3792645 0.3614199 0.9793573 0.7139381
#2 0.1313246 0.9746691 0.7276705 0.0126057
#3 0.7282680 0.6518444 0.9531389 0.9673290

#  Use grepl
df[ , grepl( "ABC" , names( df ) ) ]
#      ABC_1     ABC_2
#1 0.3792645 0.3614199
#2 0.1313246 0.9746691
#3 0.7282680 0.6518444

#  grepl returns logical vector like this which is what we use to subset columns
grepl( "ABC" , names( df ) )
#[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE

To answer the second part, I'd make the subset data.frame and then make a vector that indexes the rows to keep (a logical vector) like this...

set.seed(1)
df <- data.frame( ABC_1 = sample(0:1,3,repl = TRUE),
            ABC_2 = sample(0:1,3,repl = TRUE),
            XYZ_1 = sample(0:1,3,repl = TRUE),
            XYZ_2 = sample(0:1,3,repl = TRUE) )

# We will want to discard the second row because 'all' ABC values are 0:
#  ABC_1 ABC_2 XYZ_1 XYZ_2
#1     0     1     1     0
#2     0     0     1     0
#3     1     1     1     0


df1 <- df[ , grepl( "ABC" , names( df ) ) ]

ind <- apply( df1 , 1 , function(x) any( x > 0 ) )

df1[ ind , ]
#  ABC_1 ABC_2
#1     0     1
#3     1     1
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  • 6
    @kaos1511 it is a regular expression so yes. Read ?regexpr To get XYZ as well chain them together in the expresison like this... grepl( "ABC|XYZ" , names( df ) ) Sep 3, 2013 at 8:36
  • Thanks simon, how do i also ensure i only take rows which are >0 value for all columns that match the string i specify for column names?..will i need to see the dataframe that results and then specify manually?. If i see that there are 6 columns that match, should i say something like test<-df[ , grepl( "ABC|XYZ" , names( df ) ) ] and then test<-test[c(1:6)>0], will this work?
    – user2724207
    Sep 3, 2013 at 8:46
  • 1
    @kaos1511 that is a different question! It is bad form to keep asking question in the comments after the OP has been answered and it frustrates those who answer. Please ask a new question so everyone will see it. Thanks. Sep 3, 2013 at 8:52
  • .@SimonO'Hanlon - I am using grepl() as data <- data [, !grepl("Unique-",names(data))] to remove column where column name starts with Unique-. I see that grepl() is appending duplicate column name with .1,.2,.3 etc. Is it possible to use grepl() without affecting column name even if there are duplicates in the data frame? Jan 22, 2019 at 18:53
38

You can also use starts_with and dplyr's select() like so:

df <- df %>% dplyr:: select(starts_with("ABC"))
17

Just in case for data.table users, the following works for me:

df[, grep("ABC", names(df)), with = FALSE]
0
13

Using dplyr you can:

df <- df %>% dplyr:: select(grep("ABC", names(df)), grep("XYZ", names(df)))
0
5

Simplest solution, given to me by my statistics professor:

df[,grep("pattern", colnames(df))] 

That's it. It doesn't give you booleans or anything, it just gives you your dataset that follows that pattern.

1
  • 1
    This should be the top answer!
    – pascal
    May 18, 2021 at 12:58
3

This worked for me:

df[,names(df) %in% colnames(df)[grepl(str,colnames(df))]]
1

Try this (here, looking for variables whose name contains 'date', including all case combinations):

df %>%  dplyr::select(contains("date", ignore.case = TRUE))
0

Building off the above, I think it is the most flexible. Note that you'll need to use dplyr, but that's not a terrible thing.

Advantage: You can search for more than "contains". Here, I use "starts_with" for a relatively common string "ST". Using "grep" here could easily have driven you mad; mad, I say!

library(dplyr)

df %>% dplyr::select(starts_with("ST",ignore.case = TRUE))
0

Many of the tidyselect options have been mentioned already. contains and starts_with work very well with this specific problem. For more complicated conditions/matching you can use matches, which will select columns using a regular expression match:

library(dplyr)

df %>% 
  select(matches("^ABC")) # starts with "ABC"

# case insensitive match
df %>% 
  select(matches("(?i)^abc")) # starts with "ABC", "Abc", "abc", etc.
0

I'll provide alternative solutions to subset one or multiple columns, based on @Simon O'Hanlon's sample data:

> library(tidyverse)
> library(dplyr)
> 
> df <- data.frame(D=runif(3),
+   ABC_1 = runif(3),
+   ABC_2 = runif(3),
+   XYZ_1 = runif(3),
+   XYZ_2 = runif(3)
+   )
> 
> df %>% 
+   dplyr::select(matches('ABC'))
       ABC_1      ABC_2
1 0.06445754 0.16957677
2 0.75470562 0.06221405
3 0.62041003 0.10902927
> 
> df %>% 
+   dplyr::select(matches('ABC|XYZ'))
       ABC_1      ABC_2     XYZ_1     XYZ_2
1 0.06445754 0.16957677 0.3817164 0.1922095
2 0.75470562 0.06221405 0.1693109 0.2571700
3 0.62041003 0.10902927 0.2986525 0.1812318

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