38

Usually, I just run

git add file
git commit
git push

but if I amend the commit before pushing it (with git commit --amend), the next push fails with

hint: Updates were rejected because the tip of your current branch is behind
hint: its remote counterpart. Integrate the remote changes (e.g.
hint: 'git pull ...') before pushing again.
hint: See the 'Note about fast-forwards' in 'git push --help' for details.

How can I let git push the changes without merging branches? I only have one branch (master) and I'm the only person using this repo so why is it saying this?

git branch -a:

* master
  remotes/origin/HEAD -> origin/master
  remotes/origin/master

EDIT: Using gitk HEAD @{u}, I see that I have 2 branches, one with the original commit and another with the amended commit.

  • 1
    possible duplicate of How do I push amended commit to the remote git repo? – Deebster Sep 3 '13 at 9:44
  • @Deebster The question you linked was about amending a commit already pushed to the remote, I'm amending a commit which hasn't been pushed yet. – kiri Sep 3 '13 at 9:52
  • I only have one branch (master) and I'm the only person using this repo and I see that I have 2 branches, one with the original commit and another with the amended commit. Its conflicting, can you please explain what you exactly did – Sagar Sakre Sep 3 '13 at 10:03
  • git add file git commit -m "something" git commit -m "something else" would work fine – Sagar Sakre Sep 3 '13 at 10:04
  • @Sagar It looks like the amendment has been created as a new branch and the original commit is in master. I haven't made a new branch myself – kiri Sep 3 '13 at 10:12
57

This should only be the case if you're amending an already-pushed commit. Generally you should never do that as you're then modifying published history. In your case however, you should be able to get away with push -f, which will overwrite the remote commit with your amended revision.

  • 1
    Can't thank @joey enough, that was the exact reason why I wasted the last few minutes, and yes it did resolve the issue. – Robins Tharakan Aug 9 '17 at 10:46
  • 2
    BEWARE - if not used with caution git push -f <remote> <branch> can overwrite your commit history. Leaving no way for you to revert commit if something goes wrong. – markroxor Mar 30 '18 at 18:36
  • @markroxor yes. don't must use -f command. Because overwrite all previous commits. This is destroyer. – dgknca Jan 11 at 20:10
  • I also mistakenly ammend'ed after a push. @markroxor can you provide a workaround then, if -f is a bad solution? This would be extra helpful. – foob.ar Feb 15 at 18:47
  • "Leaving no way for you to revert commit if something goes wrong." Find someone who has not pulled from remote. :/ – markroxor Feb 16 at 5:07
13

Yup, you should not do that (pushing a commit, then changing it and trying to push it again).

Instead, you can roll back Git to your previous commit without changing the files, then creating a new commit:

git reset --mixed origin/master
git add .
git commit -m "This is a new commit for what I originally planned to be an amendmend"
git push origin master

this will create a new commit with the changes you were about to amend.

  • But I've ran git commit --amend before running git push in the first place – kiri Sep 3 '13 at 9:47
  • 1
    was there any pushed commit in the remote, before you experienced the problem? – Stefano Falasca Sep 3 '13 at 9:48
  • I'd already pushed a few commits to the remote – kiri Sep 3 '13 at 9:49
  • thanks a lot. git pull was not working for me, but git reset --mixed origin/master got it working. – Sassy Llama Nov 8 '16 at 1:39
  • This should be the better answer. The accepted one can be destructive. This is better. Thank you. – foob.ar Feb 15 at 18:49
8

you amended the pulled commit as in

git pull origin master
git commit -a --amend -m "..."
git push

you can solve the issue by reverting the amended commit:

git reset --mixed origin/master

and then making it again as a full fledged commit

  • What do you mean? I've amended it before pushing the changes – kiri Sep 3 '13 at 9:44

protected by Community Oct 2 '18 at 21:15

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