46

I'd like to pass a math operator, along with the numeric values to compare, to a function. Here is my broken code:

def get_truth(inp,relate,cut):    
    if inp print(relate) cut:
        return True
    else:
        return False

and call it with

get_truth(1.0,'>',0.0)

which should return True.

68
0

Have a look at the operator module:

import operator
get_truth(1.0, operator.gt, 0.0)

...

def get_truth(inp, relate, cut):    
    return relate(inp, cut)
    # you don't actually need an if statement here
| improve this answer | |
  • In the end, I just got rid of my function and used operator. 'if operator.gt(1.0,0.0):' – philshem Sep 3 '13 at 12:43
  • Couldn't you just use if 1.0 > 0.0:? – grc Sep 3 '13 at 13:38
  • 2
    I want to be able to change the operator dynamically (so I may have to go back to the function solution). – philshem Sep 3 '13 at 15:28
  • 1
    for in operator see operator.contains(a,b). Note that this checks presence of b in a not the other way round. – Ilia Gilmijarow Sep 25 '18 at 14:28
40
0

Make a mapping of strings and operator functions. Also, you don't need if/else condition:

import operator


def get_truth(inp, relate, cut):
    ops = {'>': operator.gt,
           '<': operator.lt,
           '>=': operator.ge,
           '<=': operator.le,
           '=': operator.eq}
    return ops[relate](inp, cut)


print get_truth(1.0, '>', 0.0)  # prints True
print get_truth(1.0, '<', 0.0)  # prints False
print get_truth(1.0, '>=', 0.0)  # prints True
print get_truth(1.0, '<=', 0.0)  # prints False
print get_truth(1.0, '=', 0.0)  # prints False

FYI, eval() is evil: Is using eval in Python a bad practice?

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    +1. Also, this answer demonstrates that you can directly return the value of ops[relate], instead of explicitly testing it and returning a literal True or False. – chepner Sep 3 '13 at 12:05
11
0

Use the operator module. It contains all the standard operators that you can use in python. Then use the operator as a functions:

import operator

def get_truth(inp, op, cut):
    return op(inp, cut):

get_truth(1.0, operator.gt, 0.0)

If you really want to use strings as operators, then create a dictionary mapping from string to operator function as @alecxe suggested.

| improve this answer | |
-2
0

Use the operator module instead:

import operator
def get_truth(inp, relate, cut):
    rel_ops = {
        '>': operator.gt,
        '<': operator.lt,
        '>=': operator.ge,
        '<=': operator.le,
        '==': operator.eq,
        '!=': operator.ne
    }
    return rel_ops[relate](inp, cut)
| improve this answer | |
-3
0
>>> def get_truth(inp,relate,cut):
...     if eval("%s%s%s" % (inp,relate,cut)):
...         return True
...     else:
...         return False
...
>>> get_truth(1.0,'>',0.0)
True
>>>
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    No, please don't use eval() when better solutions are available. – Martijn Pieters Sep 3 '13 at 12:11
  • what is your problem with eval??? You are downvoting everybody who has given a working solution that uses eval – amadain Sep 3 '13 at 12:13
  • 8
    eval() poses a security risk, and is way overused as a 'solution' whenever people do not know a better option exists. – Martijn Pieters Sep 3 '13 at 12:15

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