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I am learning how to use pexpect. My goal is getting a list of directories, then recreate those directory in another folder by using pexpect. However, how do I send multiple of commands into a pexpect child in a python loop? child.sendline() doesnt work for me =[. I have been respawning the child, but that doesnt seem like the proper way of doing it.

import pexpect
child = pexpect.spawn("""bash -c "ls ~ -l | egrep '^d'""")
child.expect(pexpect.EOF)
tempList = child.before
tempList = tempList.strip()
tempList = tempList.split('\r\n')
listofnewfolders = []
for folder in tempList:
    listofnewfolders.append(folder.split(' ')[-1])
for folder in listofnewfolders:
    child.sendline("""bash -c 'mkdir {0}'""".format("~/newFolder/%s" % folder))
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  • May I ask why you're doing this in pexpect? pexpect is useful for things such as functionally testing REPLs, but you can get and create directories in a much better way in Python, using modules such as os and shutil instead.
    – hfaran
    Sep 3, 2013 at 18:21
  • @Core2uu, I investigating a way to automate a series of complex command-line calls, including make. Sometimes I have a single folder within a folder that i don't know the name of. In bash handles wildcards like /*/ if there is only one folder, but os or shutil (from what I've researched) doesn't play nice with wild cards.
    – Ken
    Sep 9, 2013 at 20:14
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    Why not just a write a bash script then? It seems REALLY silly to do it this way in pexpect. If you don't want to write a bash script and want to write Python instead, you should take this opportunity to write some wildcard handling functionality to os and shutil.
    – hfaran
    Sep 9, 2013 at 23:55

1 Answer 1

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If you do bash -c, bash will run the command you specify, and then exit. To send multiple commands, you'll need to do it like this:

p = pexpect.spawn('bash')
p.expect(prompt_regex)
p.sendline('ls')  # For instance
p.expect(prompt_regex)
print(p.before)  # Get the output from the last command.

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