33

I have a very simple C# command shell app that executes a sql script generated by SQL Server for scripting schema and data. It's blowing up on the "GO" statements. Error message:

Incorrect syntax near 'GO'.

Here is the full sql script:

/****** Object:  Table [gym].[MembershipStatus]    Script Date: 9/3/2013 9:24:01 AM ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
SET ANSI_PADDING ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus](
    [MembershipStatusID] [tinyint] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [varchar](75) NOT NULL,
    [Description] [varchar](400) NOT NULL,
    [AllowCheckin] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [IncludeInCollections] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [ScheduleFutureInvoices] [bit] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [MembershipStatus_PK] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [MembershipStatusID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

GO
SET ANSI_PADDING OFF
GO
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ON 

INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (1, N'Active', N'Active', 1, 1, 1)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (2, N'Cancelled', N'Cancelled', 0, 1, 0)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (3, N'Collection', N'Collection', 0, 0, 0)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (4, N'Deleted', N'Deleted', 0, 0, 0)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (5, N'Expired', N'Expired', 1, 1, 1)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (6, N'Freeze', N'Freeze', 0, 1, 0)
INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] ([MembershipStatusID], [Name], [Description], [AllowCheckin], [IncludeInCollections], [ScheduleFutureInvoices]) VALUES (7, N'Inactive', N'Inactive', 0, 1, 1)
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [gym].[MembershipStatus] OFF
ALTER TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus] ADD  DEFAULT ('') FOR [Name]
GO
ALTER TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus] ADD  DEFAULT ('') FOR [Description]
GO
ALTER TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus] ADD  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [AllowCheckin]
GO
ALTER TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus] ADD  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [IncludeInCollections]
GO
ALTER TABLE [gym].[MembershipStatus] ADD  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [ScheduleFutureInvoices]
GO

The relevant section of my code looks like this:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(script, connection);
command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
command.ExecuteNonQuery();

Any ideas?

  • Important: My database is many gigabytes with many tables and stored procs. I'm generating a different file for each object because if I do it all in 1 script, I cannot open the file in any text editor because it's too big. Going in and tweaking each script to remove the GO stuff is not an option. I need to get this working with the scripts "as-is", though I do have complete control over how the scripts get generated -- I can choose any of those options in TASKS->Generate Scripts. I'm doing multiple scripts instead of 1 because the 1 script is erroring out, and I can't open it because of size. – HerrimanCoder Sep 3 '13 at 16:13
  • possible duplicate of How do I execute a large SQL script (with GO commands) from c#? – iamkrillin Sep 3 '13 at 16:24
32

As others mentioned, split your string by GO statements. But be careful, you may have the text "GO" in other parts of your script. You might also have whitespace before or after the GO statement, and you might have comments on the line after the GO statement also. Any of that would be valid in SSMS, so you may want to test for it.

Here is the method I use:

private static IEnumerable<string> SplitSqlStatements(string sqlScript)
{
    // Split by "GO" statements
    var statements = Regex.Split(
            sqlScript,
            @"^[\t ]*GO[\t ]*\d*[\t ]*(?:--.*)?$",
            RegexOptions.Multiline |
            RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace |
            RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

    // Remove empties, trim, and return
    return statements
        .Where(x => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(x))
        .Select(x => x.Trim(' ', '\r', '\n'));
}
  • You could remove the trims and replace the RemoveAll with statements.RemoveAll(s => String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s)), I just tested it and treats \r and \n as white space in the check. – Scott Chamberlain Sep 3 '13 at 16:34
  • 1
    If you want to be complete, also account for GO 10... – usr Sep 3 '13 at 17:34
  • 2
    This does not account for cases where we have strings coming from an editor with strings like "SELECT * FROM " + "SomeTable; GO " + "SELECT * FROM SomeOtherTable; GO". Any thoughts, I don't want to re-write if this has some many upvotes and clearly works. I am using it "as is", whats going on here? – MoonKnight Aug 9 '16 at 9:22
  • 1
    I can't get this Regex to match anything. Can someone posted an example sql script that this works on? – Mike W Jun 27 '17 at 13:35
  • 7
    Like @MikeW, I couldn't get the regex to match anything, so I modified it a bit: @"^[\t\r\n]*GO[\t\r\n]*\d*[\t\r\n]*(?:--.*)?$", -- match preceding and trailing tabs, newlines, but not spaces, since GO is typically on its own line. I wrote a bunch of unit tests, and it works OK in real and contrived test cases. – rianjs Sep 5 '17 at 17:23
26

If you want to be able to use GO you will need to reference to the following dlls

Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlEnum.dll

Then execute like so

 using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connection))
 {
     Server db = new Server(new ServerConnection(conn));
     string script = File.ReadAllText(scriptPath);
     db.ConnectionContext.ExecuteNonQuery(script);      
 }
11

GO is not part of SQL, it is something SQL Server Management Studio does for you to split the script up.

What you need to do is read the query in to a string then split on GO on a line by itself (you may want to use Regex for this)

//Its better to dispose the SqlCommand, I also switched constructors so I could re-use the SqlCommand.
using(SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand())
{
    command.Connection = connection;

    var scripts = Regex.Split(script, @"^\w+GO$", RegexOptions.Multiline);
    foreach(var splitScript in scripts)
    {
        command.CommandText = splitScript;
        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

Look at Matt Johnson's answer for a less naive implementation of the GO splitting.

8

GO is not a valid QA command, it is a batch separator... It is processed by Enterprise Manager to separate SQL scripts. As such, it will work in Enterprise Manager, but not in database calls from C# or other external programs....

  • 6
    Wow, Enterprise Manager - that takes me back... – Joe Enos Sep 3 '13 at 16:18
2

As an alternative to massaging the scripts to make them runnable through C#, you could just run them as-is by using the sqlcmd utility. Lot of details at:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180944.aspx

By using sqlcmd, you can script out the execution of any number of your SQL Server generated scripts, without stripping out the Go statements.

1

As mentioned in another answer, GO is not supported.

You can use String.Split() on your script using your GO statements as delimiters, and run each segment as a command, separately.

  • A simple split like this may be troublesome for larger scripts - suppose some of the text has GO as part of the text, like part of a column name or string - or if you're only looking for lines with only GO on them, that line may be is inside the text of a stored proc creation script. – Joe Enos Sep 3 '13 at 16:27
  • I agree, usually when I've had to do this in the past I've actually split expecting a newline before and after the GO statement. But a Regex may be more appropriate. – Pablo Romeo Sep 3 '13 at 16:32
1
string[] commands = sql.Split( 
    new string[]{"GO\r\n", "GO ", "GO\t"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries );
foreach (string c in commands)
{
    command = new SqlCommand(c, masterConnection);
    command.ExecuteNonQuery();
}
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
}
finally
{
    masterConnection.Close();
}
}

Found here. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/onoj/archive/2008/02/26/incorrect-syntax-near-go-sqlcommand-executenonquery.aspx

0

The top answer has a mistake. I just tested a working solution: You should allow space,';' or new line before GO

            var scripts = Regex.Split(statementText, @"(\s+|;|\n|\r)GO", RegexOptions.Multiline);
            foreach(var splitScript in scripts.Where(splitScript => !splitScript.IsNullOrWhiteSpace())) {
                cmd.CommandText = splitScript;
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
  • 1
    What statement you are trying to parse? Semicolon is not valid before or after GO in the same line. E.g. both ";go" and "go;" cause "Incorrect syntax was encountered while parsing GO" – Michael Freidgeim Jun 10 '16 at 1:32
0

1 additional point to "iamkrillin"'s answer, for using the old DLLs to make it work.

after adding the references to these DLLs

Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll , Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc.dll Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll , Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlEnum.dll

from a place like this: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\SDK\Assemblies\Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll" to the project, I needed to add the following "using" directives to the top of my code file:

using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common;

....
string query = @" //sql multi-command text here"

using (SqlConnection thisconn = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) {
    Server db = new Server(new ServerConnection(thisconn));
    db.ConnectionContext.ExecuteNonQuery(query);
}

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