50

Folks, I have a need to watch a log file for changes. After looking through stackoverflow questions, I see people recommending 'watchdog'. So i'm trying to test, and am not sure where to add the code for when files change:

#!/usr/bin/python
import time
from watchdog.observers import Observer
from watchdog.events import LoggingEventHandler

if __name__ == "__main__":
    event_handler = LoggingEventHandler()
    observer = Observer()
    observer.schedule(event_handler, path='.', recursive=False)
    observer.start()
    try:
        while True:
            time.sleep(1)
        else:
            print "got it"
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        observer.stop()
    observer.join()

Where do I add the "got it", in the while loop if the files have been added/changed?

  • use the example from github – Cmag Sep 3 '13 at 18:49
  • example on github is still not working. – Deqing May 4 '16 at 0:57
99

Instead of LoggingEventHandler define your handler:

#!/usr/bin/python
import time
from watchdog.observers import Observer
from watchdog.events import FileSystemEventHandler


class MyHandler(FileSystemEventHandler):
    def on_modified(self, event):
        print(f'event type: {event.event_type}  path : {event.src_path}')


if __name__ == "__main__":
    event_handler = MyHandler()
    observer = Observer()
    observer.schedule(event_handler, path='/data/', recursive=False)
    observer.start()

    try:
        while True:
            time.sleep(1)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        observer.stop()
    observer.join()

on_modified is called when a file or directory is modified.

  • 1
    Excellent, thank you! Now how would i only watch a particular file, and now the whole directory? – Cmag Sep 3 '13 at 18:53
  • 2
    You are welcome. You can watch for the directory that contains the file, then check for event.src_path variable in the handler methods. – alecxe Sep 3 '13 at 18:57
  • 2
    this code locks the file, so it cannot be used by other programs – denfromufa Apr 17 '14 at 20:17
  • 1
    @majidarif: define the on_create. on_delete etc methods and see what's going on – Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 16 '14 at 13:40
  • 3
    @DanTenenbaum did you ever find out how to fix the repeated 'Got it' messages? I get two consecutive messages as well. – Helk Sep 20 '17 at 0:46
6

Here's a snippet to prevent it running twice as others have commented in @alecxe answer:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

class MyHandler(FileSystemEventHandler):
    def __init__(self):
        self.last_modified = datetime.now()

    def on_modified(self, event):
        if datetime.now() - self.last_modified < timedelta(seconds=1):
            return
        else:
            self.last_modified = datetime.now()
        print(f'Event type: {event.event_type}  path : {event.src_path}')
        print(event.is_directory) # This attribute is also available
  • Thanks for this - exactly what I was looking for, if you're still active could you answer my Q here (actually this Q answers most of it) and i'll green tick : stackoverflow.com/questions/57531818/… – Datanovice Aug 17 at 14:15
  • the print statement print(f'Event type: {event.event_type} path : {event.src_path}') gives an error ? i changed it to print(event.event_type) print(event.src_path) print(event.is_directory) maybe someone can clarify why? – Cat Nov 20 at 14:28
  • @Cat, Are you using a version of Python<3.6 ? Since python 3.6 they introduced f-strings: realpython.com/python-f-strings They are great! – run_the_race Nov 22 at 8:07

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