57

I was trying to read a file into an array by using FileInputStream, and an ~800KB file took about 3 seconds to read into memory. I then tried the same code except with the FileInputStream wrapped into a BufferedInputStream and it took about 76 milliseconds. Why is reading a file byte by byte done so much faster with a BufferedInputStream even though I'm still reading it byte by byte? Here's the code (the rest of the code is entirely irrelevant). Note that this is the "fast" code. You can just remove the BufferedInputStream if you want the "slow" code:

InputStream is = null;

    try {
        is = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));

        int[] fileArr = new int[(int) file.length()];

        for (int i = 0, temp = 0; (temp = is.read()) != -1; i++) {
            fileArr[i] = temp;
        }

BufferedInputStream is over 30 times faster. Far more than that. So, why is this, and is it possible to make this code more efficient (without using any external libraries)?

104

In FileInputStream, the method read() reads a single byte. From the source code:

/**
 * Reads a byte of data from this input stream. This method blocks
 * if no input is yet available.
 *
 * @return     the next byte of data, or <code>-1</code> if the end of the
 *             file is reached.
 * @exception  IOException  if an I/O error occurs.
 */
public native int read() throws IOException;

This is a native call to the OS which uses the disk to read the single byte. This is a heavy operation.

With a BufferedInputStream, the method delegates to an overloaded read() method that reads 8192 amount of bytes and buffers them until they are needed. It still returns only the single byte (but keeps the others in reserve). This way the BufferedInputStream makes less native calls to the OS to read from the file.

For example, your file is 32768 bytes long. To get all the bytes in memory with a FileInputStream, you will require 32768 native calls to the OS. With a BufferedInputStream, you will only require 4, regardless of the number of read() calls you will do (still 32768).

As to how to make it faster, you might want to consider Java 7's NIO FileChannel class, but I have no evidence to support this.

  • 1
    Aah I see, I should have checked the API first before asking. So it's simply an 8K internal buffer. That makes sense. Thanks. As for the "more efficient" part, it's not necessary, but I thought my code might have been overly redundant in some way. I guess it's not. – ZimZim Sep 3 '13 at 21:59
  • 12
    @user1007059 You're welcome. Note that if you used FileInputStream's read(byte[], int, int) method directly instead, with a byte[>8192] you wouldn't need a BufferedInputStream wrapping it. – Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 4 '13 at 4:01
  • @SotiriosDelimanolis When to use read() byte by byte and when to use read(byte[]) array of byte. As I think reading array is always better. then can you give me example where to use read() byte by byte OR read(byte[]) array of byte. OR BufferedInputStream.? – Asif Mushtaq Apr 1 '16 at 13:47
  • @UnKnown Don't have a great example. Maybe the first byte contains some flag about the content of the file or some other metadata. I don't think anyone would ever read an entire file using read(). – Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 27 '16 at 19:04
  • 1
    @emily BufferedInputStream is faster when your code requests to read fewer bytes (not necessarily just one byte) than the buffer size each time. BufferedInputStream acts optimistically and reads more than what you need, so that, when you come back, it already has the next batch. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 3 '17 at 16:58
2

A BufferedInputStream wrapped around a FileInputStream, will request data from the FileInputStream in big chunks (512 bytes or so by default, I think.) Thus if you read 1000 characters one at a time, the FileInputStream will only have to go to the disk twice. This will be much faster!

0

It is because of the cost of disk access. Lets assume you will have a file which size is 8kb. 8*1024 times access disk will be needed to read this file without BufferedInputStream.

At this point, BufferedStream comes to the scene and acts as a middle man between FileInputStream and the file to be read.

In one shot, will get chunks of bytes default is 8kb to memory and then FileInputStream will read bytes from this middle man. This will decrease the time of the operation.

private void exercise1WithBufferedStream() {
      long start= System.currentTimeMillis();
        try (FileInputStream myFile = new FileInputStream("anyFile.txt")) {
            BufferedInputStream bufferedInputStream = new BufferedInputStream(myFile);
            boolean eof = false;
            while (!eof) {
                int inByteValue = bufferedInputStream.read();
                if (inByteValue == -1) eof = true;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Could not read the stream...");
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("time passed with buffered:" + (System.currentTimeMillis()-start));
    }


    private void exercise1() {
        long start= System.currentTimeMillis();
        try (FileInputStream myFile = new FileInputStream("anyFile.txt")) {
            boolean eof = false;
            while (!eof) {
                int inByteValue = myFile.read();
                if (inByteValue == -1) eof = true;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Could not read the stream...");
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("time passed without buffered:" + (System.currentTimeMillis()-start));
    }

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