45

I generally have -e set in my Bash scripts, but occasionally I would like to run a command and get the return value.

Without doing the set +e; some-command; res=$?; set -e dance, how can I do that?

  • Because of problems just like this one, I would recommend NOT using set -e Here are some more examples: mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/105 – idfah Sep 4 '13 at 20:02
  • 6
    Gotta disagree. When using bash for configuring systems or other, actual work, set -e is essential for showing correctness. – phs Jul 18 '14 at 23:20
57

From the bash manual:

The shell does not exit if the command that fails is [...] part of any command executed in a && or || list [...].

So, just do:

#!/bin/bash

set -eu

foo() {
  # exit code will be 0, 1, or 2
  return $(( RANDOM % 3 ))
}

ret=0
foo || ret=$?
echo "foo() exited with: $ret"

Example runs:

$ ./foo.sh
foo() exited with: 1
$ ./foo.sh
foo() exited with: 0
$ ./foo.sh
foo() exited with: 2

This is the canonical way of doing it.

  • 4
    You probably want to initialize ret=0 before you do that, in case the command succeeds. Some of them do :) – rici Sep 4 '13 at 19:58
  • @AdrianFrühwirth -- I had a ret=0 before foo || ret=$? so it would show the case where it succeeded. I actually tested it multiple times (for i in $(seq 30); do echo '$ ./foo.sh'; /tmp/stack.sh ; done) and copy-pasted some results. – docwhat Jul 21 '14 at 0:41
  • @TheDoctorWhat Sorry, I overlooked that. I have rolled back to your edit. Thanks :-) – Adrian Frühwirth Jul 22 '14 at 14:23
  • No problem. I've made mistakes that needed catching plenty of times. – docwhat Jul 24 '14 at 23:44
12

as an alternative

ans=0
some-command || ans=$?
6

Maybe try running the commands in question in a subshell, like this?

res=$(some-command > /dev/null; echo $?)
-3

Use a wrapper function to execute your commands:

function __e {
    set +e
    "$@"
    __r=$?
    set -e
}

__e yourcommand arg1 arg2

And use $__r instead of $?:

if [[ __r -eq 0 ]]; then
    echo "success"
else
    echo "failed"
fi

Another method to call commands in a pipe, only that you have to quote the pipe. This does a safe eval.

function __p {
    set +e
    local __A=() __I
    for (( __I = 1; __I <= $#; ++__I )); do
        if [[ "${!__I}" == '|' ]]; then
            __A+=('|')
        else
            __A+=("\"\$$__I\"")
        fi
    done
    eval "${__A[@]}"
    __r=$?
    set -e
}

Example:

__p echo abc '|' grep abc

And I actually prefer this syntax:

__p echo abc :: grep abc

Which I could do with

...
        if [[ ${!__I} == '::' ]]; then
...
  • @DavidWolever Please tell me what you think about this solution. – konsolebox Sep 4 '13 at 19:53
  • This will e.g. break on I/O redirection. – Adrian Frühwirth Sep 4 '13 at 19:59
  • @AdrianFrühwirth I doubt that. Example? – konsolebox Sep 4 '13 at 20:02
  • See mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050. – Adrian Frühwirth Sep 4 '13 at 20:03
  • 2
    How is it simpler than a one-line r=0; command || r=$? which works as expected? Oh well, not trying to start argument here, I don't even use set -e myself since its implementation is really stupid. Whatever works ;-) – Adrian Frühwirth Sep 4 '13 at 20:31

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