29

I have a column called MealType (VARCHAR) in my table with a CHECK constraint for {"Veg", "NonVeg", "Vegan"}

That'll take care of insertion.

I'd like to display these options for selection, but I couldn't figure out the SQL query to find out the constraints of a particular column in a table.

From a first glance at system tables in SQL Server, it seems like I'll need to use SQL Server's API to get the info. I was hoping for a SQL query itself to get it.

6
  • 6
    Hold the constraints in a MealType Table, this way if there are more options than just Veg,Notveg, you can easily expand.
    – Elias
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:31
  • What database are you using? The constraints are probably in the catalog if you require this.
    – dcaswell
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:33
  • 1
    Which DBMS are you using?
    – user330315
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:34
  • 1
    The system tables have the info you need. sysobjects and syscolumns will be of interest... if you're using MS SQL
    – radarbob
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:42
  • i'm using Microsoft SQL Server.
    – Raja
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:45

7 Answers 7

55

Easiest and quickest way is to use:

sp_help 'TableName'
3
  • 2
    This is an awful solution for getting info programmatically. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 18:01
  • 12
    That's ok, the author didn't want to get them programmatically; they just wanted a listing on constraints. If you are tweaking a DB or fixing an issue, sp_help is by far the easiest.
    – Zonus
    Commented Jul 18, 2017 at 15:41
  • Why do you get the impression they didn't want to get them programmatically? "I'd like to display these options for selection" implies this is for displaying in a list box or similar in some application and they didn't accept your answer Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 9:54
23

This query should show you all the constraints on a table:

select chk.definition
from sys.check_constraints chk
inner join sys.columns col
    on chk.parent_object_id = col.object_id
inner join sys.tables st
    on chk.parent_object_id = st.object_id
where 
st.name = 'Tablename'
and col.column_id = chk.parent_column_id

can replace the select statement with this:

select substring(chk.Definition,2,3),substring(chk.Definition,9,6),substring(chk.Definition,20,5) 
5
  • Pardon my ignorance, but what is chk here?
    – Raja
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 21:22
  • Chk is the alias I am using for sys.check_constraints, do you need the constraints separated?
    – orgtigger
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 21:23
  • Yeah. Thanks for helping out - i've never used SQL before.
    – Raja
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 21:59
  • Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't see how this can work. Doing 2 inner joins with a mutually exclusive condition will never return anything. If chk.parent_object_id = col.object_id is true, then chk.parent_object_id = st.object_id can't be, unless they have the same object ID, which would go against the principle of having an ID.
    – Virus721
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 7:53
  • I did not design the system tables but I believe object_id in all cases is a Foreign Key and not a primary key. So the columns, the table, and the contraints can all belong to the same 'object' learn.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/…
    – orgtigger
    Commented Nov 9, 2023 at 18:41
15
SELECT obj_table.NAME      AS 'table', 
        columns.NAME        AS 'column',
        obj_Constraint.NAME AS 'constraint',
        obj_Constraint.type AS 'type'

    FROM   sys.objects obj_table 
        JOIN sys.objects obj_Constraint 
            ON obj_table.object_id = obj_Constraint.parent_object_id 
        JOIN sys.sysconstraints constraints 
             ON constraints.constid = obj_Constraint.object_id 
        JOIN sys.columns columns 
             ON columns.object_id = obj_table.object_id 
            AND columns.column_id = constraints.colid 
    WHERE obj_table.NAME='table_name'
    ORDER  BY 'table'
1
  • 'table_name' is the table name itself without putting 'dbo.' before the table name. Commented Jul 20, 2022 at 15:05
10

You can use

sp_helpconstraint 'tableName', 'nomsg'

to get all the constraints for the table.

"sp_help" return far more information.

0

Thanks to orgtrigger for his example! I improved it to be able to remove unnecessary constraints (and then create their modified versions, if needed). Maybe this code will be useful for anybody.

  -- removing old constraints
DECLARE @ConstraintNames TABLE (Name VARCHAR(MAX), RowNum INT)
DECLARE @TableName VARCHAR(100) = 'HubSpot'

INSERT @ConstraintNames
  SELECT [constraint].name,
         ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [constraint].[name]) AS RowNum
  FROM sys.default_constraints [constraint]
  INNER JOIN sys.columns col
      ON [constraint].parent_object_id = col.object_id
  INNER JOIN sys.tables st
      ON [constraint].parent_object_id = st.object_id
  WHERE 
  st.name = @TableName 
  AND col.name IN ('ForceUpdateOnImport', 'ForceUpdateOnExport')
  AND col.column_id = [constraint].parent_column_id
  
SELECT * FROM @ConstraintNames

DECLARE @i INT = 1,
        @count INT,
        @constraintName VARCHAR(MAX),
        @sql VARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT @count = COUNT(1) FROM @ConstraintNames

WHILE @i <= @count 
  BEGIN 
    SELECT @constraintName = cn.Name FROM @ConstraintNames cn WHERE cn.RowNum = @i
    SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE ' + @TableName + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + @constraintName
      
    EXEC (@sql)
    SET @i = @i + 1
  END
0

Below is helpful for check and default constraints. I use it for implicit constraints to offer up guidance for what the name should be. If you remove everything after the where clause, it should be good for any check/default constraints.

SELECT /* obj_table.NAME      AS 'table', 
        columns.NAME        AS 'column',
        obj_Constraint.NAME AS 'constraint',
        obj_Constraint.type AS 'type',
        sss.name as 'schema',*/
        'ALTER TABLE [' + ltrim(rtrim(sss.name))+'].['+ltrim(rtrim(obj_table.name)) + '] DROP CONSTRAINT [' + obj_Constraint.NAME + '];' As 'Wrong_Implicit_Constraint',
        'ALTER TABLE [' + ltrim(rtrim(sss.name))+'].['+ltrim(rtrim(obj_table.name)) + '] ADD CONSTRAINT [' + CASE obj_Constraint.type 
        WHEN 'D' THEN 'DF' WHEN 'F' THEN 'FK' 
        WHEN 'U' THEN 'UX' WHEN 'PK' THEN 'PK' WHEN 'N' THEN 'NN' WHEN 'C' THEN 'CK' 
        END + '_' + ltrim(rtrim(obj_table.name)) + '_' + columns.NAME + ']' +
        CASE obj_Constraint.type WHEN 'D' THEN ' DEFAULT (' + dc.definition +') FOR [' + columns.NAME + ']'
        WHEN 'C' THEN ' CHECK (' + cc.definition +')'
        ELSE '' END +
        ';' As 'Right_Explicit_Constraint'
    FROM   sys.objects obj_table 
        JOIN sys.objects obj_Constraint ON obj_table.object_id = obj_Constraint.parent_object_id 
        JOIN sys.sysconstraints constraints ON constraints.constid = obj_Constraint.object_id 
        JOIN sys.columns columns ON columns.object_id = obj_table.object_id 
            AND columns.column_id = constraints.colid 
        left join sys.schemas sss on obj_Constraint.schema_id=sss.schema_id 
        left join sys.default_constraints dc on dc.object_id = obj_Constraint.object_id
        left join sys.check_constraints cc on cc.object_id = obj_Constraint.object_id
    WHERE obj_Constraint.type_desc LIKE '%CONSTRAINT'
    AND RIGHT(obj_Constraint.name,10) LIKE '[_][_]________' --match double underscore + 8 chars of anything
    AND RIGHT(obj_Constraint.name,8) LIKE '%[A-Z]%'          --Ensure alpha in last 8
    AND RIGHT(obj_Constraint.name,8) LIKE '%[0-9]%'                 --Ensure numeric in last 8
    AND RIGHT(obj_Constraint.name,8) not LIKE '%[^0-9A-Z]%' --Ensure no special chars
0

Query to fetch constraint information:

SELECT t1.TABLE_NAME, t1.COLUMN_NAME, STRING_AGG(COALESCE(t1.CONSTRAINT_TYPE,''),','), t1.ORDINAL_POSITION, STRING_AGG(COALESCE(t1.reference_table,''),'') AS reference_table, STRING_AGG(COALESCE(t1.reference_column,''),'') AS reference_column
FROM
(SELECT c.TABLE_NAME, c.COLUMN_NAME, tc.CONSTRAINT_TYPE, ORDINAL_POSITION, t2.TABLE_NAME AS reference_table, t2.COLUMN_NAME AS reference_column
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS c
LEFT JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE ccu ON c.COLUMN_NAME = ccu.COLUMN_NAME AND c.TABLE_NAME = ccu.TABLE_NAME
LEFT JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS tc ON ccu.CONSTRAINT_NAME = tc.CONSTRAINT_NAME
LEFT JOIN (SELECT  ccu1.TABLE_NAME, ccu1.COLUMN_NAME, rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME, rc.CONSTRAINT_NAME
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS rc 
LEFT JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE ccu1 ON ccu1.CONSTRAINT_NAME = rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME)t2
ON ccu.CONSTRAINT_NAME = t2.CONSTRAINT_NAME
GROUP BY c.TABLE_NAME, c.COLUMN_NAME, tc.CONSTRAINT_TYPE,ORDINAL_POSITION, t2.TABLE_NAME, t2.COLUMN_NAME)t1
GROUP BY t1.TABLE_NAME, t1.COLUMN_NAME,t1.ORDINAL_POSITION
ORDER BY t1.TABLE_NAME, t1.ORDINAL_POSITION
1
  • Remember that Stack Overflow isn't just intended to solve the immediate problem, but also to help future readers find solutions to similar problems, which requires understanding the underlying code. This is especially important for members of our community who are beginners, and not familiar with the syntax. Given that, can you edit your answer to include an explanation of what you're doing and why you believe it is the best approach? Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 0:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.