12

I have found this crazy javascript code.

Can someone elaborate the exact steps this code is going through and why?

(function a(a){
    return a;
})
(function b(b){
    return b;
})
(function c(c){
    return c;
})
(true);
3
  • 5
    Its just three functions and returning just true.. Thats it
    – suresh.g
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:05
  • I'm not. My friend gave me as a puzzle.
    – Joon
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:06
  • 2
    The tricky part of this "puzzle" are not the automatically invoked functions, but why they are called from left to right. If you add a console.log statement before every return, you will see that a gets outputted before b, which gets outputted before c. But how can function a know the input arg before function b returns it?
    – Steve
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:25
10
  • This will self-invoke a which is given function b as argument (since a is defined as a variable inside a's local scope that will take presence over the function a which is declared in parent scope.).
  • Then it will self-invoke b which is given c as as argument.
  • Finally function c is self-invoked which returns true as that is given as argument.

You can look at it as a chain doing this:

a(var a)    // function b given as arg. When a returns b() will be invoked
   b(var b) // function c given as arg. When b returns c() will be invoked
      c(true)

a when inside the function (local scope) is a variable because function foo(bar){} is the same as function(){var bar = arguments[0]}.

The function a could be written like this and do the same exact thing:

function a(foo){
    return foo;
}

You can verify by doing this:

console.log('start');

(function a(a){
    console.log('a', typeof a);
    return a;
})
(function b(b){
    console.log('b', typeof b);
    return b;
})
(function c(c){
    console.log('c', typeof c);
    return c;
})
(true);

console.log('end');

ONLINE FIDDLE HERE

Console output (updated to show in FF as well use Chrome to see the function definition output):

> start
> a function
> b function
> c boolean
> end
12
  • 1
    I agree that this is the correct order of output, but how does the body of function a know the input arg when it clearly relies on function b to produce it?
    – Steve
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:29
  • @Steve functions are parsed before any execution takes place (the same reason you can call a function before or after its definition) so b is already defined when a is being called. As JS is single-threaded a must finish before b can be called as next entry at the event queue. It doesn't use the result from b only the definition of b itself (think var b = someFunction).
    – user1693593
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:31
  • If you are talking about hoisting, then this does only apply to function declarations, not function expressions... and putting parentheses around a function makes it a function expression, i.e. function a() {..} does get hoisted, but neither var a = function(){...} nor (function a() {...}) does.
    – Steve
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:35
  • @Steve they are declarations here too (not expressions) just not of the global scope (they belong to the self-invoked scope = function declarations inside a function). The parenthesis makes the result of that (first self-invoked) function the expression result not everything inside it (you can have a whole bio-sphere inside there of nested and chained declared functions).
    – user1693593
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:43
  • @Ken-AbdiasSoftware - Thanks for clarifying... so if I understand you correctly, you are not saying that function a gets hoisted, but the result of it does... is that correct?
    – Steve
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:50
4

To understand what's going on, simplify it:

(function a(d){
    return 5*d;
})
(2)

The above code, run in the console, will output 10. What's happening is the brackets are telling the code to run immediately (it's called a self-invoking function), taking whatever follows as a parameter. So I'm creating function a, and immediately running it with 2 as the parameter.

The code you have is basically the same thing, but with more levels and no multiplication. All of your functions just return their parameters, and the one being passed is the boolean true, so the code will output true at the end.

1
  • Nice explanation that also helps make sense of the other answers :)
    – bobs12
    Sep 5 '13 at 6:59
2

This returns true.

First function a (bad name?) is defined which takes an argument and returns it. This function has been called immediately, with an argument which is return value of (function b(b){ return b; })(function c(c){ return c; })(true). Which gets evaluated before the a gets called.

(function b(b){ return b; })(function c(c){ return c; })(true) is a similar construct, with a function b being defined which returns the argument it receives, and again is called immediately with similar argument and same for the third function c.

1
(function a(a){
            alert(a);
        return a;
    })
    (function b(b){
        alert(b);
        return b;
    })
    (function c(c){
        alert(c);
        return c;
    })
    (true);

Its just return the next part of parameter with () symbol.

1

I'll take a stab at it.

(function a(a){
  return a;
})
(function b(b){
 return b;
})
(function c(c){
return c;
})
(true);

These are all self-invoking functions.

But the last one:

    (function c(c){
      return c;
    })
    (true);

Gets the value true passed in. So, when it returns "c" - you get true.

For the others, it just moves up as anonymous functions get passed in the value return by the function. So, a visual.

   (function a(a){   <-- the return of b, gets passed in here
      return a;
    })(function b(b){return b;}) <-- the return of c, gets passed in here

    (function c(c){return c;})(true);  <--- true gets passed into c.
1

The functions are executed in a top-down order. You can call a function with another function as its argument. This is fine. It keeps doing this until "true" is passed as an argument, in which case the calling chain returns "true".

(function a(a){       // Function a is called with function b as an argument.
    console.log('a'); // The console.log statement is executed,
    return a;         // Then function a returns b 
})                    

(function b(b){       // Function b is called with function c as an argument.
    console.log('b')  // The console.log statement is executed
    return b;         // And then function b returns c 
})

(function c(c){       // Function c is called with "true" as an argument
    console.log('c')  // The console.log statement is executed
    return c;         // And then function c returns true.
})

(true); 
2
  • I don't think this is correct. If I put console.log inside of each function, the order is opposite of what you are saying. But why?
    – Joon
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:14
  • @Juno. You are absolutely right. I revised the comments to explain why this is happening. The functions are called/executed in a top-down order.
    – ktm5124
    Sep 5 '13 at 5:31

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