5

demo

html...

<div id="main">
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td><img src="" width="200" height="100" /></td>
            <td>
                <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
                <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
                <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
            </td>
            <td><img src="" width="100" height="100" /></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td style="color: blue; background-color: yellow;">some text here</td>
            <td colspan=2 style="color: white; background-color: blue;">next goes here</td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

css...

img{
    background-color: red;
    display: block;
    border: 2px solid white;
}

What I have tried :

#main table{
    width: 200px;
    display: table;
    table-layout: fixed;
}

demo

What I want is here:

Original size:

enter image description here

When I re-size the main:

enter image description here

8
  • I didn't got your question'
    – Mr. Alien
    Sep 5 '13 at 6:56
  • @Mr.Alien When main width is decrease the whole contents should be decreased accordingly. You may understand first see top demo and then see last one. Sep 5 '13 at 6:58
  • 1
    Use % instead of px
    – Mr. Alien
    Sep 5 '13 at 7:00
  • @Mr.Alien Yeah, I could use that but I can't use % this time. Sep 5 '13 at 7:02
  • @C-Link you can try the css media queries for this purpose Sep 5 '13 at 7:53
2

Use zoom property, for example :

#main table{
    width: 300px;
    display: table;
    table-layout: fixed;
    zoom: 0.4;    
 }
4
  • When we look at the little sample @c-link post, it seems like he needs a zoom property. In which cases should we prefer to use zoom property, why is it not good to use here?
    – aldebaran
    Sep 18 '13 at 12:49
  • What I see in the demo the main problem lies in gettin all the rows withi the border of the table. Primarily that problem should be kept in mind. Then when the fundamental design is accurate then he can think about the zoom property. Your solution may be a hint but not the solution to the problem. Moreover he wants to modify the size of the main in CSS. Here in my answer I have addressed the primary problem in the demo he has given. Check the link of demo in his question then u can realize what my point is. Please do comment after u check the demo. Sep 19 '13 at 2:27
  • You may be right, when different parts of a complex web page have different zoom values it may result in a strange looking page but I cant consider his page as a whole since he did not give clues about it, I just solved what he asks:)
    – aldebaran
    Sep 19 '13 at 6:42
  • Yeah u have the issue he was asking solved but there lies some other flaws in his coding. Sep 19 '13 at 6:52
1

I have checked your code.

But the way you are trying to do this, is not possible because the parent table takes the cumulative width of all the <td>'s in the row with the highest no of <td>'s.

Hence your table takes the width of the first <tr>.

To reach your goal you can follow the following steps-

  1. Each <tr> will contain only one <td>.
  2. That <td> will contain another table. i.e. In the <td> of the first <tr> of the given table you should write the code of a table containing the 1st row of the current given table.
  3. In the <td> of the 2nd <tr> of the given table you have to accomodate another table with 2 <td>s of the 2nd <tr> in your current table.

check the new demo or the following HTML code-

<div id="main">
<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table width=100% style="overflow-x:hidden">
                <tr>
                    <td>
                        <img src="" width="200" height="100" />
                    </td>
                    <td>
                        <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
                        <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
                        <img src="" width="50" height="30" />
                    </td>
                    <td>
                        <img src="" width="100" height="100" />
                    </td>
                </tr>
            </table>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table width=100%>
                <tr>
                    <td style="color: blue; background-color: yellow;">some text here</td>
                    <td style="color: white; background-color: blue;">next goes here</td>
                </tr>
            </table>
    </tr>
</table>

No change required for the CSS code.

The output will be as follows-

output

1

As already said, play with %s, here is an example.

<div id="main">
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td><img src="" width="100%" height="100%" /></td>
            <td>
                <img src="" width="100%" height="30%" />
                <img src="" width="100%" height="30%" />
                <img src="" width="100%" height="30%" />
            </td>
            <td><img src="" width="100" height="100" /></td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/pUnsA/2/

1
  • vonatar, Not at all a solution. The 2nd row of the given table is missing in your solution. Sep 18 '13 at 7:57
0
#main table{
 display: table;
table-layout: fixed;

}

remove the width :200px; the image size is bigger than the with of TD hence it goes off the screen

0
0
  1. Dont use tables for layout, use floated divs instead.
  2. Use Jquery to work out Browser Height and Browser Width. (you will need to include "Jquery CQDN" script references in your tags
  3. Set height and width on your containers either a percentage of the total screen height and width or a percentage of a container div (gets more complex then, but more versatile to intricate layouts)
  4. Important! Dont set height and width in your CSS for any elements you are resizing with jquery! this will only confuse the hell out of things
  5. however you can use Min-Width and Min-height values, to stop any containers shrinking past any limits/constraints you want to set on them

Doing it this way will negate the need to tweak the html for different browsers. Works for me for professional results.

The Javascript: The bit in the document.ready block, will automatically resize your whole page when the user resizes thier browser window.

Here's a working solution!.. (just copy/paste it to try)

<html>
<head>
    <script src="http://codeorigin.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <style>
        html{float:left; padding:0px; margin:0px;  background-color:red;}/* /w/h Handled by Javascript*/
        body{float:left; padding:0px; margin:0px;  background-color:orange; font-size:11px; font-family:Verdana; }/* /w/h Handled by Javascript*/
        div.ContentContainer{float:left; margin:0px; padding:0px; background-color:yellow; } /* /w/h Handled by Javascript*/
        div.SiteInfoContainer{float:left; padding:0px; margin:0px; background-color:green;  color:White; }/* /w/h Handled by Javascript*/
        div.SiteDetailContainer{float:left; padding:0px; margin:0px; background-color:blue; color:White; }/* /w/h Handled by Javascript*/
    </style>
</head>
<body>
      <div class="ContentContainer">
        <div class="SiteInfoContainer">25% Wide, 100% high</div>
        <div class="SiteDetailContainer">75% wide, 100% high</div>
      </div>

<script type="text/javascript">
        function MasterContentFullHeight() {

            var TotalWinHeight = $(window).height();
            var TotalWinWidth = $(window).width();

            $("html").css('height', TotalWinHeight);
            $("html").css('width', TotalWinWidth);

            $("body").css('height', TotalWinHeight);
            $("body").css('width', TotalWinWidth);

            $(".ContentContainer").css('height', TotalWinHeight);
            $(".ContentContainer").css('width', TotalWinWidth);

            $(".SiteInfoContainer").css('width', ((TotalWinWidth/ 100) * 25));
            $(".SiteInfoContainer").css('height', TotalWinHeight);

            $(".SiteDetailContainer").css('width', ((TotalWinWidth / 100) * 75));
            $(".SiteDetailContainer").css('height', TotalWinHeight);

        }

           $(document).ready(function() {
                MasterContentFullHeight();
                $(window).bind('resize', MasterContentFullHeight);
           });
    </script>


</body>
</html>
0

You could use a wrapping element with percent-based padding to set the aspect ratio you want and then position the images with %-based width / height inside of that wrapper. You could then decide if you wanted a percent based gutter size, or fixed gutter size. I coded it up with a fixed gutter and negative margins on the parent to negate that gutter, using box-sizing to easily split it into a grid, but you could simplify it and achieve the same result by being more precise with your left / top positions and widths to account for gutters. You could also replace the ID attributes for the images with :nth-child selectors if you know your target browsers have the capability.

I have included a JS Fiddle that shows a working example as well here: http://jsfiddle.net/xbafy/

HTML:

<div id="image_grid">
    <img src="" id="i1" />
    <img src="" id="i2" />
    <img src="" id="i3" />
    <img src="" id="i4" />
    <img src="" id="i5" />
</div>

CSS:

#image_grid {
    position: relative;
    height: 1px; /* To prevent IE from not adding margins to 0px height elements */
    padding-top: 40%; /* Whatever % you want to use to set the aspect ratio properly */
    margin: -10px; /* Used to negate our border added below so that images run to edges */
}

#image_grid img {
    position: absolute;
    border: 10px solid #fff; /* Used to create a hard non-flexible gutter between images, use padding if youd rather, and use % if you still want it flexible based on size */
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

#i1 {
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 50%;
    height: 100%;
}

#i2, #i3, #i4 {
    left: 50%;
    width: 20%;
    height: 33.33%;
}
#i2 { top: 0; }
#i3 { top: 33.33%; }
#i4 { top: 66.66%; }

#i5 {
    top: 0;
    left: 70%;
    width: 30%;
    height: 100%;
}
0

You could try using media queries in CSS. It also looks like you're using tables to lay your page out. I would highly recommend you don't do this, for several reasons:

1) It's been bad practice for over a decade and will make your site seem unprofessional to anyone who looks at the code.

2) It's inflexible. The layout of your site cannot be easily altered/rearranged this way whereas if you build in divs and use CSS for your layouts it will be very easy to update in the future.

3) Whilst it may not seem it at first, using divs and CSS IS actually an easier way of doing it. You'll end up writing a lot less code this way. Remember one content block the correct way is just a single element ( but the tables way requires at LEAST 3 () and that's if you ignore the 'tbody' tag, which you shouldn't do really.

0

please find updated fiddle "http://jsfiddle.net/XUeAV/"

<table width="100%">
        <tbody><tr>
            <td width="55%" height=""><img width="" height="100" style="" src=""></td>

if you want to make it responsive as width of #main changes then you need to define width of table in %

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